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7

I would not worry about adding a “wire” to the switch either the box grounded those nice bright brass yokes being connected to the metal box will be more than enough grounding (in the US it is code compliant to use this same method with some devices). Your switches look to be in exceptional condition I hope the contacts are also if so they may last another ...


4

You never switch the neutral, well, "never" is a strong word, sometimes some special generator installations switch the neutral, but almost never should you switch the neutral, just the 2 hots. I like your idea of putting the GFCI inside to protect it. To connect the neutral, there is usually a small bussbar you can land those on. If your new hot ...


3

Not with the outlet on a spur with 12/2. Worse, you cannot simply bypass the switch, unless there’s another light in the room under control of a switch. Code requires every room must have a light switch in the usual location, and the switch must either operate a light, or a socket.


3

The 2 blacks From the switch go to the red and orange. Doesn’t matter clip the reds straighten and use a wire nut to combine the 3 wires. Then black to orange with a wire nut. The white on the switch goes to that group of whites If you have a white on the switch, last the green to the ground or bare copper. That it was a 3 way doesn’t matter if the other ...


2

You don't have enough wires for a double switch You don't have enough wires in the wall for a double switch, unfortunately. You'd need a /3 cable (black, red, white, bare) for that, but you only have a /2 cable (black, white, bare), and all the wires in that cable are already spoken for. Maestro to the rescue! However, Lutron makes a solution for this ...


2

Yes, you can run just about any length needed between the generator power inlet mounted on the side of your home to the transfer switch. Of course the wire / cable will need to be sized right for the generator and distance. Always a good idea to upsize the wiring in case you decided to go with a larger generator later. Like @Harper-ReinstateMonica said, ...


2

Can’t do it. There’s a “Great Wall of China” between the left switch (and its cables) and the right switch. You cannot cross that with any wire, except safety ground. It’s a Code violation, it’s a safety hazard to workmen working on the left circuit... and what’s more, if there are any GFCIs or AFCIs in either circuit, it will trip them. What you might be ...


2

Keeping the GFCI indoors will cut the cost of a GFCI disconnect but be prepared to shell out some bucks for indoor GFCI. It's a great idea to still run the neutral, you never know when you might want to change out that cheap disconnect with a little subpanel (think about it). You would just cap the neutral in your disconnect box with a wire nut and leave it ...


2

You would need some 12/3 going from the switch to the outlet. You would need the neutral, which you have; you would need the switched hot, which you have but what you don't have is the always hot. that where the third wire comes in. Are there any other wires in the outlet box?


2

Try replacing the switch, it sounds very much like the one you have isn't working correctly.


1

If you want to wire in the switch you've got you need to replace that two conductor romex with a 3 conductor one (3 insulated conductors plus earth) Your supply connection (the short black wire from the wire nut) goes to the side of the switch where the terminals are linked by a brass fin the red and black to the fant-light go to the other side of the switch....


1

It does seem like the center top cable in your diagram supplies the light fixture, and that the cable at switch 2 is a loop. If that's the case there's no way to reconfigure connections and maintain switching at switch 2 without adding a conductor.


1

This isn't a hard situation. My preferred approach would be to run power into the first switch 3-way box and 12/3 or 14/3 with ground from that one to the other 3-way switch. Then run the switched cable to both ceiling boxes. That takes care of the switched outlets. Then run a 12/2 or 14/2 with grnd to the ceiling outlet boxes from the first 3-way switch box ...


1

It looks like the white wire may be a neutral. This is good. However, it looks like the switch is a 4 way switch (though I always though 3 way switches were used at the top of the stairs). This is less good -- there's no consistent hot leg on it. You can verify both of these with a multimeter. So I don't think this box is going to help you much, as you need ...


1

Copied from my comment as an answer: I took off the working closet light and it is a black/white wire going to the fixture. I traced this wire back to the ceiling box and the black wire goes to #4, white goes to #1. Red wire in #1 is always hot, black wires in #4 are hot when the light is on. Wired my fixture the same as the wire to the closet light - black ...


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