12

Surge protectors do not "cut off or disconnect" power. They sit between the conductors and conduct when the voltage is excessive. Depending how excessive the voltage is and for how long, they may or may not survive any given event. At no point do they cut off voltage to a device, unless the device they are part of happens to fail in a manner that results in ...


12

Surge protectors and circuit breakers both cut off power during exceptional conditions, but they have different purposes and react to different events: Circuit breakers Circuit breakers have only one job: to prevent the wiring inside your house from catching on fire. That's it, they do nothing else. They don't protect you from shocking yourself, or from ...


7

First yes you can connect a laptop into a two prong outlet. Is it Safe? That's anybody's guess. My easiest answer without out rewiring the apartment is to purchase a small UPS system for your laptop. KVA size depends on your computer equipment demands. It has no direct electrical connection to the supply side power. In other words it creates it's own power....


4

According to howstuffworks.com the most common type of surge protectors contain a metal oxide varistor or a gas discharge arrestor that utilizes the grounding wire to divert extra current. However, as others have commented, the neutral wire is usually also used in conjunction with the ground, and therefore, you should get some, but not full protection when ...


4

A regular consumer UPS will keep the voltage within acceptable limits for electronic equipment, but it won't do much cleanup of electrical noise or irregular frequency while it's powering the equipment from the mains power. That's because they're designed to supply mains power as long as it is available. The battery kicks in only if the mains power goes ...


4

I would recommend a whole house surge suppressor. They can be attached to your existing panel. If you have extra space in the panel and depending on the type of panel, you can get them that plug right into 2 side by side poles. Otherwise they can be attached to a double pole breaker. They come in various types and protection ratings. Of course the greater ...


4

Grounding of metal cased equipment is most often done for safety reasons, rather than ESD protection. If a fault occurs inside the equipment that places line voltage on the chassis, the voltage is shunted to ground and will trip the breaker on the circuit. This protects you from accidental electrocution. Edit: Since this is powered by a brick, safety ...


4

No, a surge protector will not. An RCD (Residual Current Device) or GFCI (Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter) aka ELCB (Earth Leakage Circuit Breaker) are the devices that can provide protection, BUT you should be aware that nothing is 100% - these devices can fail... You should get the cords away from access by your pet, shielding or protective strips or ...


3

This gets rather complicated rather fast, because the requirements of the electrical code partially contradict the practical requirements of radio. Worse, finding someone able to do it properly (or approve it) requires someone experienced in both fields at once - such people are few and far between. Fortunately there's a way to do an end-run around the ...


3

The GFCI for the circuit might be in a bathroom. Check the GFCI's in the house as one might be feeding the kitchen (which should be on GFCI)


3

The UK uses fused plugs because instead of using individual spurs or "home runs" rated at the receptacle rating to feed a few outlets at a time, they put all receptacles on a single "ring main" circuit that can provide more current (32A is typical) than appliances and their cords can handle (16A max, although smaller is common with BS1363 plugs). It has ...


3

You will need to flush-mount the protector, feeding the wires through a knockout Since your panel is flush-mounted into the wall, and you generally are best off not modifying a deadfront if you can help it (while the UL listing on the loadcenter cabinet is not technically necessary, modifying the cabinet deadfront could confuse an inspector). Instead, you'...


2

The white wires from a GFCI or surge protector need to go to a neutral bus that is isolated from the ground bus in a sub-panel. You don't currently have that in the two-pole breaker enclosure that you have now. DON'T attach a GFCI neutral (white wire) to the ground bus. This is a violation of the code and can be dangerous as it puts neutral current on the ...


2

Good question! DOC - to answer your question, (for 240 volt application) the two BLACK wires go to a 2-Pole 20A breaker and the white goes to the ground bus or a bonded neutral bar. Here is a cut sheet for a unit similar to yours (and similar to those that we install on a daily basis: http://www.five-two-one.com/pdf/LT521SPD_Web.pdf Hope this helps you!


2

Defective power strip. Return it to the store and demand a replacement, before it causes a fire.


2

I have done exactly that in a similar situation. It did not explode or anything. The unit I used was a HEPD80 from Schneider. I capped one of its hots and wired its remaining hot, neutral, and ground in parallel with an L5-30 plug and receptacle to improvise "an L5-30 surge protector" which otherwise does not exist or I couldn't find one. I have no proof ...


2

From your description it sounds like a small amount of tap water landed on the exterior of this surge protector and not much went into the receptacle holes. If this was tap water, then the surge protector will be safe to use. If this was water with vinegar or salt added, then it might be different.


2

This is why surge protectors have N-G protection Decent surge protectors not only protect against surges on the hot wire(s) relative to the neutral wire, they also protect against surges on hot and neutral relative to the equipment grounding and bonding system (in other words, ground). The surge voltage between neutral and ground will get clamped by the ...


2

From what I can see it looks like a direct buss connection these usually require a circuit breaker because when they fail it is a direct short to ground. It looks like you have unused double pole breakers that the device could be wired to that would be be better but usually they are rated 20-30 amps but not at the same as the main feeding the panel.


2

It's a heavy load like an air conditioner, so use an air conditioner extension cord. Manufacturers can be greedy/cheap about sizing extension cords, using the absolute minimum UL requires for safety. Bumping to the next size could cost them 25 cents a unit wholesale, which on 100,000 units, is real money. Using a same-gauge extension cord is not a good ...


2

I've used that exact part exactly as you described before on a 30A commercial circuit without incident. Now, do I know that it has protected equipment from surges? No. But No damage has occurred since its installation. Do keep in mind, that one of the 'ready' lights won't come on, because each ready light depends on a separate hot having voltage ...


2

You can change out the old breaker feeding the pump. This would be the safest way. A surge protector should be located close to your service this would then protect everything not just the pool. I voted up because it is easy to swap an old non GFCI for a GFCI protected breaker and this will make the current pool service much safer.


2

First I would like to extend my sympathy for you having a ZINSCO Panel. It is without question the worst panel ever manufactured except for a Federal Panel. However I must say that it has kept many an electrician employed on the replacement of these panels. The breakers have a tendency to weaken and spread over time and that causes arcing and overheating on ...


2

This is in addition to Norm's excellent answer, which is the correct answer (and I upvoted it). ESD stands for "electrostatic discharge." It's usually used to describe protecting highly sensitive electronics (computer chips) from the kind of discharge you get walking across a carpet. That is NOT the case here. It's odd that they're using the term "ESD" ...


2

A whole-house surge protector is used for the same reasons that you use the power-strip surge protectors with your computers and TVs - to protect that equipment from power surges. The benefit of a whole-house unit, though, is that it protects everything connected to your electrical panel - your furnace, AC, water heater (if electric), washing machine, as ...


2

The IEEE develops standards for surge protection devices (SPDs). Curious electrical engineers in the audience can read their “trilogy” on the subject. For the average DIYer I recommend this much simpler presentation. Two important points come out of these materials. (1) No SPD shunts all of the transient energy. (2) The further the appliance from the SPD ...


2

They are intended for different purposes: Surge protectors are mostly designed to protect against lightning strikes, although more expensive models may include some kind of power conditioning (protecting against smaller surges). A UPS, (Uninterruptible Power Supply), on the other hand, is designed to provide some amount of power to a computer during a ...


2

First, I'd suggest looking at Is is safe to plug a surge protector into a 2-prong outlet using a 3-to-2-prong adapter?. That may answer your question. I'd also suggest looking at the outlet box and seeing if it's already grounded, in which case you could just replace the outlet. However, if it's protection against power fluctuations you want, I'd suggest ...


2

Antennas can build up a sizeable static charge which needs to be dissipated. Unfortunately the obvious solution of grounding the antenna also removes the signal from the wire. A coaxial grounding block allows static charges to dissipate from the center conductor without interrupting the signal. More elaborate devices are filled with a gas which is ionized ...


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