13

Surge protectors and circuit breakers both cut off power during exceptional conditions, but they have different purposes and react to different events: Circuit breakers Circuit breakers have only one job: to prevent the wiring inside your house from catching on fire. That's it, they do nothing else. They don't protect you from shocking yourself, or from ...


13

No You should ground the amplifier itself, although in most cases this is automatic as part of the power cable and safe domestic wiring. You should not ground the speaker cables though. The amp may drive both speaker wires (the so-called "push-pull" or "bridged" arrangement). This delivers 4 times the power for the same voltage output ...


12

Surge protectors do not "cut off or disconnect" power. They sit between the conductors and conduct when the voltage is excessive. Depending how excessive the voltage is and for how long, they may or may not survive any given event. At no point do they cut off voltage to a device, unless the device they are part of happens to fail in a manner that results in ...


9

They are intended to be mounted outside the box... You are correct that they are intended to be mounted to a KO (usually on the breaker box), instead of being left inside, all flop-a-dop, as yours was. You can use this unit still, although you will probably want to leave some space around it, as its further lifespan is unknown. (All MOV-based suppressors ...


7

First yes you can connect a laptop into a two prong outlet. Is it Safe? That's anybody's guess. My easiest answer without out rewiring the apartment is to purchase a small UPS system for your laptop. KVA size depends on your computer equipment demands. It has no direct electrical connection to the supply side power. In other words it creates it's own power....


7

TL;DR Put it in the main subpanel (i.e., in your house) There are "Meter Mains" that include: Meter Main breaker Some regular breakers Feed to other panels Yours is not like that. It has the meter and the main breaker and a feed to your main panel. And that's it. The ones that include some regular breakers use them to (a) feed one or more ...


7

Yes, Protect! In short, to be thorough: if speakers are mounted above ground, ground the speaker housing, guide the wire through grounded galvanized metal tubing until under ground, and install a surge protector in the audio path. What NEC/CEC, IEEE and ARRL say... Most buildings now have many additional outside connections—exterior lighting, remote gate ...


6

The entire gray thing needs to be changed. Right now you have a "Meter-Main" which has only a meter and main breaker. It has no space for any other circuit breaker. What you need is a Ranch Panel, which has all of these: A meter A main breaker typ. 200A 8 spaces for surge suppressors, breakers, generator interlocks, solar etc. Thru Lugs to carry ...


6

I am not familiar with static or lightning protection concerns and will have to defer to others. However, I would not ground the actual wires running between the amp and the speakers. Some amplifiers run push-pull, that is, both wires to a single speaker are active amplifier outputs delivering power signal 180 degrees out of phase. If you ground one of the ...


5

According to howstuffworks.com the most common type of surge protectors contain a metal oxide varistor or a gas discharge arrestor that utilizes the grounding wire to divert extra current. However, as others have commented, the neutral wire is usually also used in conjunction with the ground, and therefore, you should get some, but not full protection when ...


5

A regular consumer UPS will keep the voltage within acceptable limits for electronic equipment, but it won't do much cleanup of electrical noise or irregular frequency while it's powering the equipment from the mains power. That's because they're designed to supply mains power as long as it is available. The battery kicks in only if the mains power goes ...


5

The "don't put a surge protector on a surge protector" rule is not about the surge protection, it is about overloading circuits and tripping over wires - which really doesn't apply here. I would treat the installed receptacles as "ordinary" and use a surge protector (of known quality) to add more receptacles.


5

Having the neutral cross the hot bus is not a code violation. However since neutrals are not protected for overcurrent, if for some reason a second circuit was tied in and the insulation melted it could damage the panel badly enough to require replacement. I have seen this. I would route the wire around as not to create this remote but possible hazard. But ...


4

I would recommend a whole house surge suppressor. They can be attached to your existing panel. If you have extra space in the panel and depending on the type of panel, you can get them that plug right into 2 side by side poles. Otherwise they can be attached to a double pole breaker. They come in various types and protection ratings. Of course the greater ...


4

Grounding of metal cased equipment is most often done for safety reasons, rather than ESD protection. If a fault occurs inside the equipment that places line voltage on the chassis, the voltage is shunted to ground and will trip the breaker on the circuit. This protects you from accidental electrocution. Edit: Since this is powered by a brick, safety ...


4

No, a surge protector will not. An RCD (Residual Current Device) or GFCI (Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter) aka ELCB (Earth Leakage Circuit Breaker) are the devices that can provide protection, BUT you should be aware that nothing is 100% - these devices can fail... You should get the cords away from access by your pet, shielding or protective strips or ...


4

Attached to the load side of the main breakers How? A special mini-lug just for the purpose? It sounds like it was double tapped on lugs not made for that. That is a common problem with how people install these things. Instructions usually say to put them on a breaker. That makes physical installation make more sense. You can double tap some branch ...


3

This gets rather complicated rather fast, because the requirements of the electrical code partially contradict the practical requirements of radio. Worse, finding someone able to do it properly (or approve it) requires someone experienced in both fields at once - such people are few and far between. Fortunately there's a way to do an end-run around the ...


3

The GFCI for the circuit might be in a bathroom. Check the GFCI's in the house as one might be feeding the kitchen (which should be on GFCI)


3

The UK uses fused plugs because instead of using individual spurs or "home runs" rated at the receptacle rating to feed a few outlets at a time, they put all receptacles on a single "ring main" circuit that can provide more current (32A is typical) than appliances and their cords can handle (16A max, although smaller is common with BS1363 plugs). It has ...


3

The IEEE develops standards for surge protection devices (SPDs). Curious electrical engineers in the audience can read their “trilogy” on the subject. For the average DIYer I recommend this much simpler presentation. Two important points come out of these materials. (1) No SPD shunts all of the transient energy. (2) The further the appliance from the SPD ...


3

The job of AFCI is to protect the house from series or shorting arc faults, which cause fires. The main reason AFCI breakers are required today is because so many houses are built with backstab connections to switches and receptacles, and those so often fail in a series arc fault mode. Keep in mind, the builder's electrician is the one who wired the ...


3

As mentioned all appliances, TV's, computers, LED Lighting, Dishwashers, etc.(pretty much everything we use except a toaster or incandescent light bulb) have a device whether it be a switch mode power supply, pulse width moudlator, rectifier, etc. that changes the AC input to DC outputs to power and control stated devices. Any switching action creates what ...


3

You will need to flush-mount the protector, feeding the wires through a knockout Since your panel is flush-mounted into the wall, and you generally are best off not modifying a deadfront if you can help it (while the UL listing on the loadcenter cabinet is not technically necessary, modifying the cabinet deadfront could confuse an inspector). Instead, you'...


3

That needs to be enclosed, modern ones have LED’s to show when they blow. If there are any dark areas on the case I would replace it they don’t really wear out but when a large spike hits they dump the spike to ground when they take two large of a hit they overheat and many times burn up, So if there are dark areas replace. If you live in an area with clean ...


3

Several ways to do that. Fit a surge breaker Replace the Dryer breaker with a CHSPT230 breaker, which is simply an Eaton surge suppressor built into a 30A breaker. The 30A breaker isn't for the surge suppressor, it's for any general 30A load. The point of that is to save you 2 spaces in your panel. That means you'd install the CHSPT230 to replace your dryer ...


3

I'd pick two of those 20s and swap them for a 20-50-50-20 triplex breaker Since your panel is listed and labeled to accept tandem/"double stuff" breakers in all positions, and looks to be uniformly configured with 20A breakers, we can take two adjacent 20A breakers in the panel and switch them out for a MP22050CT (if you can find it) or Q22050CT (...


3

To add to what Ed has said... Installing an accessory ground bar and landing it there is not an option because neutral is not ground. I understand why you think that... but consider what you are looking at. Here's the thing. Grounds never carry current except during fault conditions, which are supposed to be momentary. Neutrals carry service current ...


3

Cut the cable to whatever length works for you, then install a replacement 3-prong plug. Last time I looked, replacement 5-15P plugs cost anywhere from $3 to $10 at a hardware store. If you want to do it at almost no cost and you are suitably equipped, remove both ends from the strip, grab the metal plate that covers the back of the strip using a pair of ...


3

Your panel is full. That's a problem. There are two possible solutions here, but long-term, you need to consider replacing with a larger panel or adding a subpanel. Direct Bus Installation According to the User Manual, you can do a Direct Bus Installation - see page 4. Basically, you connect the surge protector to the mounting screws between the main breaker ...


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