Hot answers tagged

6

Any of the pipe hangers available at your local big-box home improvement store are designed to support a full pipe. They would be just decorations if they didn't... Pick a type that seems simplest to you to use, get appropriate fasteners (you're attaching this to concrete, a simple screw or nail isn't going to do the trick), ensure you've got the proper 1/4&...


5

The "very minimalist look" is a bit too minimalist for boring old function. You may regret "living with it" when it fails and a hunk of rock lands on your foot (or other body part), or someone else's. Failure is very much an option. Fasteners can be ripped out pretty easily, and wood can fail when you have a long lever (legs) attached to ...


3

Place it in a trench 40 feet long with 18" of cover. In the future you can pull wires through it. (It' been a long week).


2

Can it be done? Sure. Is it practical? - you'll need to discuss with the engineer and consider the impact on your budget. Basically you will need to increase the strength (and usually the size, to get that strength) of the beam that crosses the space so that it can support the beam going down the middle of the extension. Likewise, it will require a ...


2

Looks like you have a 4' x 2 x 1 1/2 cast iron specialty fitting -hub and spigot pipe existing. If so, why not cut it back to the stack and reduce it to 3" ty at the top of the stack so you can run the vent straight up the outside wall until you tie it back into the existing vent. This will to allow you drill through the double beam (not sure 2- 2x10s?) ...


2

It's always smart to ask when dealing with support structures in a building. I'm not an engineer but based on my long experience in dealing with various structural issues attaching screws of that size to the bottom of a 6x8 beam to hang a curtain is not an issue. The assumption, Of course, is that this is a standard curtain and not made of chain mail.


2

I had a similar situation recently and here's what I did. Disclaimer-there might be better ways to do this and I suggest you wait on more answers or comments. I created a temporary header near the doorway using 6x6's on the ceiling and floor, with bottle jacks and studs to hold the system up. I used foam board on the ceiling to not damage the drywall finish. ...


1

Well, you could try one LVL and if it collapses, then rebuild the floor and use two. It really depends on how much stuff you have in the room above and how solid you want the floor to be. Do you care if the floor bounces when you jump up and down? I doubt that a 20 foot wall is not load bearing. What is holding up the roof? If you go into the attic, are ...


1

Yes, that connection is allowed, I have one like that above my garage door. Basically the straight beam and the cross beam will have to be stiffer than they would need to be without the post. This means they'll have to be taller, or be the same height and use thicker steel, so the beams will probably cost more. Indoor posts are ugly, so I think you're ...


1

Consider installing a pressure-treated 2x8 base plate onto the floor slab, underneath the stringers. That's roughly how you'd build a new staircase by today's standards. Notch the bottom of the stringers so the new base plate will fit. This will be the trickiest part since you can't disassemble the staircase. Slide the base plate into place. It should be ...


1

I have done similar many times. I hold a ~4+ foot long 2x4 up to the ceiling and wedge another 2x4 from the floor to ceiling. If there is flooring that might be damaged I will put one on the floor. I do this on both sides of the wall a few feet back to provide enough working room. If a larger door opening I will use 2-3 temp studs and a longer top plate. ...


1

General prudence dictates that you support adequately while working. I'd punch through the wall on both sides and set mini walls, so that you can install a header etc unhindered and be able to remove more than one stud easily. And even if you don't fear something catastrophic, just maintaining the ceiling height before you stick something new in is a big ...


1

If you want a robust solution, sprinkler pipe hangers with hex bolts would do well. You could install simple angle brackets on the wall (with the horizontal portion at the top) and drill for these. This would also give you some degree of adjustment in case your brackets weren't exactly positioned.


1

I've built quite a few homes with floor trusses, and we didn't always have the foresight or opportunity to lay in strongbacks during the truss set. Have you tried getting longer 2x6 boards in there? You might be surprised how much they flex. I'd bet you can get 16-footers in there without much issue. I'd start with that. Just don't let your grip slip and ...


1

The simplest thing to do is just sister 2x6's to the 2x4's. It doesn't need to be the full length of the 2x4's, you could make it a few inches shorter and it will be fine.


1

In the same situation ( 8' span) , I glued and screwed 5/8 plywood to the bottom of the 2 X 4 s. Making something like a wide flange beam. It worked as even some furniture was stored up there ( about 7' to the peak). Plywood ,not OSB or particle board.


1

In my experience spindles such as that have never been used in load-bearing situations by legitimate builders. Doing so would create two hinge points along the wall's height, which would be plain dangerous. Given that fact, the arrangement and location of the wall, and the attic situation, I'm reasonably confident that the wall isn't structural. Should you ...


1

It's difficult to see exactly how this is framed, but...The 2x framing directly below your blue line appears to be the top plate of the wall with spindles in it. That wall appears to be supporting attic/ceiling framing members. The perpendicular members (2x6?) appear to be bearing on the spindle wall, and not spanning over. That leads me to believe that ...


1

Given the size of the piers and their anchor depth and the fact that you can use metal (ibeam) cross beams, you can definitely do just 4. Remember when building on piers, more is not better (unless we are talking large commercial building). When you add more piers you are allowing for a greater future issues with leveling based on heave. Now that was ...


1

This is one of those "best" questions that's highly dependent on site conditions and your capabilities and prerogative. It also depends on how much footing you actually want (or need, if frost heave is a concern). I see two options: Do as you suggest, first pouring footings and then setting block under the wall plates. This would require someone ...


1

Typically you use sanded grout for seams over 1/8" and non-sanded for under. Any good quality grout will do the trick if you follow the on-package instructions. Regarding the spacers, you want to remove them mainly because they'll cause a gap or weak point in the seam that could cause the grout to fail prematurely. Try using an awl or small screwdriver ...


1

Temporary post removal If the beam members don't all join over one post, you can probably temporarily remove the two interior posts while you do your concrete work. Assuming adequate lap (with no more than one butt joint over each post) and adequate cross-fastening (say three screws every 18"), it'll hold the empty deck for a span of 18'. If you see ...


1

I use Denshield on every shower i do. I understand the manufacturers recommendations but i think it is good practice to go the extra mile and use a waterproofing membrane on all seams and screw heads. It costs relatively little and it makes it much less likely that a seam or screw head will allow water through. When butting two pieces together i put ...


1

Whether one product is "better" than another is really subjective. What I can tell you is that denshield is a more advanced product, eliminates the need for a membrane, and I find it easier to use than cement board for sure However, I would get four sheets instead of three. Then you only need to have three vertical seams, total: two corners and one along a ...


1

Do it right so you do not have to do it again. I use Denshield for tiling bathroom surrounds. It is the same thickness as the drywall this means that there is no transition disparity between the drywall and the DenShield. ( assuming you have a single layer of 1/2" drywall in the rest of your bathroom ) It comes with a waterproof membrane already ...


1

Your reasons for using green board are valid. They are along the same lines of reasons for not going to the gym and staying in shape. Driving to the gym takes time. I have more fun on the couch. I sweat and have to do more laundry. These are lies we tell ourselves so that we feel better doing the wrong thing. I understand that you don't want to take ...


1

I would never even consider using 1.5" or 2" PVC or ABS piping of any schedule as a structural member; expecially for the application that you describe. These materials can flex and given some aging or overextended stress could fail dramatically. Sure you may be able to make 5" or 6" diameter thick walled piping work in this application but the cost of ...


1

Try: Simpson CCQ4.62-3.62SDS Or for end conditions: ECCQ4.62-3.62SDS https://www.strongtie.com/sdsscrewcolumncaps_columncaps/ccq-eccq_productgroup_wcc/p/ccq.eccq#LoadTables Click on load tables for exact dimensions.


1

You want the post and beam to have the same width dimension. Although you're trying to recycle, it's best to build this with a 6x6 beam and 6x6 posts. It will be stronger and look nicer anyways. Attach them together with the Simpson LCE4 seen below. A total of 4 of them will be needed and each of them will need (14) 0.162 x 3 1/2 into the beam and (10) 0.162 ...


1

Given your desire to make it comparatively thin (which is bad for stiffness in general) the best bet would be a Stressed Skin Panel also known as a Torsion Box Common construction for that as a DIY is two sheets of plywood, (one top, one bottom) and some sort of spacers plus lots of glue. It's an interesting and educational experiment to compare how two ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible