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16

It's just a typical floor drain, and it's the ideal place to drain your dehumidifier. What you see is the water trap, which prevents sewer gas from escaping. It presumably connects to your sanitary sewer, so be conscientious about what you dump into it. Here's a modern drain just to illustrate the trap concept: image source


6

Sewer pumps are designed for specific uses and their ability to handle different liquids and solids varies hugely. Read the documentation for your specific one. The most common enemies: For all drains, not just pumped ones: Fats that harden when slightly cooled. EG, chicken fat, olive oil. If it's solid in the fridge but liquid when you pour it down the ...


6

Sumps typically have standing water, as Jasen mentions, part of the reason of having them is a sediment trap to prevent debris from going into the storm drain. All that "compost" didn't end up in the storm drain. You also likely don't want that compost entering your pipe and possibly getting a clog. A deeper sump pit means you have to clean it out less ...


4

3% hydrogen to air is explosive. Even sealed batteries discharge some hydrogen gas when charged--they have to release the pressure or they will break the case. The seal is accomplished with a rubber (or silicone like material) over the port and usually a plastic shield welded in place to keep the seals in place. These batteries are not designed to be ...


4

This is a regular basement floor drain. there is a trap below the slab and that's why you see the water... that's a good sign. You should get a drain cover from your home store similar to the one below. Measure the diameter of the drain and hit the home store or a plumbing supply store for the cover.


3

My first thought is it’s a floor drain until I notice it is close to the wall. This is a location for a clean out. Can you see standing water? If it is a clean out and not a floor drain it should not be left open. If you see standing water indicating a p trap below the floor it is a standard floor drain and would be fine to continue to use for the ...


3

How is a sump discharge normally set up in freezing climates? Short and wide, with plenty of slope, so that ice cannot build up in the bottom of the pipe. A 2" pipe to a 4" pipe with a fall to a gutter or ditch leading away from the house. Alternatively, completely below frost line to a dry well. What can I do in the short term Buy 350-450 feet of ...


2

Last time I checked the installation instructions on a similar drain pit it said to fill the bottom with concrete. standing water, depending on the climate, can harbour mosquitoes, filling the sump prevents this. conversely the sump can trap debris preventing pollution of waterways so if there's a lot of crud that gets washed in there it might be a good ...


2

Your house is probably surrounded by a drain pipe laid on a bed of gravel to allow water to flow from the ground into the pipe. Gravity drains this pipe to the lowest point, your sump pit. The pit is also filled with gravel to let water perc in from the ground so it can be pumped out and away from the structure. As long as your pump is able to keep up with ...


2

In some locations you cannot connect the sewer to the sump system, I understand this is not the discharge but sewage can be in that drain and pumping it outside could Create a health hazard. I have installed back flow preventers in the past to keep back pressure from entering, these do have there own problems but stop the city system from filling your ...


2

Ingenious, except I’d worry about: 1) timing, 2) seasonal conflict, 3) head contamination, 4) pressure stress. 1) Timing: Murphy’s Law...but you could locate the heads away from decks, walkways, etc. 2) Seasons: Seems like the sump pump would run most during the “wet” season and not during the “dry” season when the sprinklers need it most. Could you ...


2

I would mainly be concerned with hair in a basement dump sink. If anyone using it has long hair I would strongly strongly suggest a basic drain filter. I bought a magnetic one that I thought was a PITA but it was actually so easy to use that I didn't mind dumping stuff out once a week or so into a trash. That being said you cannot put large items down (...


1

DISCLAIMER: Not explicitly an answer to your question and definitely not what you're going to want to hear. Also, not a landscape expert. I believe that this is going to take some landscaping instead of or in addition to a pump. Sloping the land away from the house would be ideal. If your house is (unfortunately) on a low spot, you may need to put in a bit ...


1

I bought a utility pump from either Home Depot or Lowes, I don't remember which one, but it starts pumping at about 1-3/8" and turns off at 1/4". It is a Utilitech #0435062 automatic submersible pump that is 1/3 HP and pumps 24GPM. This may work for you. Hope this helps.


1

That is good , the idea of a home sump is to remove ground water before it causes damage; you have no ground water problem. That is better than frequent pump running. Normally ,drain tile around house perimeter bring water to the sump to remove it, so I would expect some connection to the sump.


1

There really aren't any hard-and-fast rules here as long as you don't work the pump too hard. Plenty of homes in my area have sump lines running all the way to the street gutter at 100 feet or more. You're right that you want to minimize bends, but a few won't hurt. The critical point is that the pipe is large enough. If you're talking about standard 1-1/4&...


1

Some of the reasons might be: The height is needed for the float which contains the switch to rise to a vertical position to turn the pump on. If the pump was in a shallow hole, the float would not turn on until the water level in the room was 22" above the pump. Also if the sump basin is too shallow, the pump would turn on and off more often. This ...


1

Two things: It allows room for the inlet(s) to the sump pit. If the pit were too shallow the water might backup into the inlet pipe before the pump switches on. It gives the pump a bit of "buffer" when you have sudden surges of inlet water. If you didn't have that, it might overflow before the pump turns on and gets a flow going. Also, check ...


1

If you are sure you will not need the sump fill and pack it with dirt until ~4” from the top then a few bags of sackcrete can be mixed up and poured so the floor is usable. Finishing a small area like his would not be hard and that would cover the hole.


1

I would say yes you should be able to get rid of the pump if it is not needed . I have had homes with a similar setup and no pump. I would probably seal the sump so if the water starts smelling it is not stinking up the house. With natural drainage I believe the system would be safer with regards to possible flooding with natural drainage especially in an ...


1

It seems that your floor drain and your sump pump are not connected which is often the case due to building codes. The sump pit is designed so that any water that gets next to the foundation or under the floor (presumably concrete) will flow into the pit and collect until there is enough to trigger the pump switch which will then lift the water and expel it ...


1

Water is either coming up from below (a rising water table) or its coming from surface water (the surrounding ground water in the saturated soil.) Either way, it needs to be collected and carried away. IMHO, it’s preferred to collect and deal with the water outside of the basement. If it comes up from a rising water table, it will enter the living space ...


1

It is very common to not hit water in the dry season. Some homes have sump pits because the walls allow water in through cracks and there is not a true high water problem, this is common with block walls. I have poured several basements and sealed them from the outside and installed drains and backfilled with rock; no leaks no pit needed.


1

I don’t like getting rid of moisture once it’s inside the house. I like keeping all the moisture on the outside of the house. I see there is at least one crack in the concrete block wall (in the mortar joint), which will allow moisture in the house. Water flows in the direction of least resistance. A channel design assumes moisture will enter the house ...


1

I had a similar project at my son's home so we dug a 100 foot trench about 2 feet deep, the deeper the better, added 12" of gravel (rocks), laid in 4" schedule 35 perforated drain pipe, a little more gravel, and then a layer of top soil. Planted grass seed and all the water drains into the ground. You can not bury a flexible hose but can lay it on top of ...


1

Yes, gravity exists under your house and I’m pretty sure Sir Isaac Newton would agree, but I don’t think he could explain this... But here are some ideas: 1) a small underground spring, 2) a bearing wall between the two locations, 3) Major addition separates areas 1) Because there’s different soil conditions at the two locations, it makes me think the ...


1

You typically can only get back what you paid the home inspector for his service. In other words, this is your problem now, you can forget about the inspector. The sump pump isn't your issue here. The problem is the water. Stop the water and you stop the noise and wear and tear on the pump. One thing you should make sure of first is that there is a ...


1

Make sure that your home owners insurance covers water damage from a sump pump failure if the pump fails and damages an area of your house. A couple years ago, mine failed during a long wet spell and I called my insurance company and was told that even though I was covered from every other water disaster, a sump failure was not covered. (This disaster for ...


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