4

By sizing the loads appropriately Every load has a nameplate or published draw. You are to use the numbers on the various nameplates to assure that you are not overloading the circuit, or (more literally to Code), to assure you provide large enough circuit(s) for your loads. You can get any ampacity of battery charger that you want. You seem to be looking ...


4

It appears to me that your problem is that the ice maker drain is BELOW the trap. So anytime there is water at that level, gravity will draw it into your ice maker drain. I think you'd be better off locating the in the vertical section of sink drain ABOVE the trap.


4

"Professionals" can be idiots too. That serves no purpose and, accordingly, has no code requirement. You can cut it out, move it and all you need to do is ensure you have a check valve near the exit from the sump pump and a long 90 (avoid a hard 90 with a drop like this) to the entrance to the lateral. You should install a clean-out near the exit ...


4

That will work fine. What you want to avoid is reducing from say 2" to 1.5" as this can cause things to get stuck and block the flow. But you should be good to go with a 1.5" opening up to a 2".


3

Those pumps are rated in feet or meters of head pressure. Most submersible pumps similar to what you show are only rated to 15-20’ of head this is the equivalent of 7-10 psi or the maximum pressure it can develop. For that amountc of power it draws it probably has a fair volume. To get more pressure you usually have to sacrifice volume or add horse power. ...


3

How is a sump discharge normally set up in freezing climates? Short and wide, with plenty of slope, so that ice cannot build up in the bottom of the pipe. A 2" pipe to a 4" pipe with a fall to a gutter or ditch leading away from the house. Alternatively, completely below frost line to a dry well. What can I do in the short term Buy 350-450 feet of ...


2

From you question and follow on Comment, it appears that the location of the sump pump is at the right location. It’s at the lowest point and after the heavy rain, the sump hole filled with water. From your descriptions, it appears that you believe the sump basin is sealed therefore not allowing water into the basin. From your original question – There is ...


2

The placement of the connection of your ice machine drain is causing the wastewater to drain into your ice machine drain pipe. With the faucet fully on, the section of the pipe highlighted in blue is filling with water. When pipe is full and even with water flowing through that section, you can see that some water will be entering the ice machine drainpipe....


2

Newer sump pumps have larger openings for the impeller. If your has gravel at the bottom like mine then you need something under it to prevent damage


2

I've never stored an ejector pump "wet" but if I wanted to do that, I'd store it in a 50-50 mix of distilled water and standard green automotive antifreeze. The antifreeze contains rust inhibitors. I've personally stored a large diesel engine with a cast iron block for five years after flushing and filling it with 50-50 green antifreeze, and at the ...


2

You should not immediately dig in this spot but you should do some research, get some expert advice and probably should put in a sump system to keep your basement dry. If you have water entering your basement during rain storms it’s a good idea to implement a drainage system. There are different approaches but you’re suggesting a sump pit and pump. I ...


2

How does it work with just the hose and no sprinkler? That pump probably doesn't have enough pressure to push water through a sprinkler. Here's a back of the envelope analysis. The pump is spec'd as having a lift of 6 m, which is ~19.8 ft. A column of water with a cross section of 1 sq inch and 2.31 feet high weighs 1 lb, or 1 psi for every 2.31 feet of ...


2

Your wall plate can easily span that rough-in box. That's not a concern. What is maybe a concern is the location of the rough-in. Doesn't look quite right for a standard tub or shower. The builder may have expected a slightly larger room. I'm not aware of any rules regarding clearance around a sump pit. You'd obviously want the lid to function properly (...


1

I would put it in sufficient water and test it. Then I would fit a new switch depending on the result. As you seem to be able to cope if it is not working for a day or so then getting a replacement if it fails is not an issue.


1

You done good. It's doing its job and no risk of damage; sounds like you set it up perfect. The reason for more frequent kicks is for every increment you go deeper, you add that much more water spilling into the bucket but a sump float has a fixed height it kicks on. Your flow rate went up; the good news us you're draining more water from your basement than ...


1

That is good , the idea of a home sump is to remove ground water before it causes damage; you have no ground water problem. That is better than frequent pump running. Normally ,drain tile around house perimeter bring water to the sump to remove it, so I would expect some connection to the sump.


1

A sump pump without an inlet won't have any way of getting water into it to be pumped out. It would, therefore be rather useless. A sump pit without an inlet pipe but numerous holes (such as yours) will allow water to seep into the pit where it will make its way to the sump pump's inlet and be pumped out of your basement. "Normal" is probably ...


1

Not a problem. FWIW, I installed the check valve above the coupling so that it would prevent draining when I remove the pump for service. The valve I used is threaded, so I can still remove it if needed. No problems after many (20?) years of service. Tip: Put the pump in place without the coupling and mark the PVC pipe to indicate where the coupling should ...


1

Generally you want the holes at the bottom. This allows you to remove the maximum amount of water from under your slab or foundation. You will not pump out the entire ground water supply as it takes a finite amount of time for ground water to move toward a low-pressure area. So your sump pump will create a "dip" in the ground water level around ...


1

You may be trying to do something that could lead to a major failure by overloading the roof structure with the weight of the standing water if the pump does not operate properly AND violates the Building Code by allowing too much standing water to accumulate on the roof. There are many circumstances where a pump could fail, but is even more dangerous with ...


1

Is your check valve upside down? or is your ceiling concrete and have a wet spot? I typically use a 2" pvc union. Is that check valve spring operated or just a gravity flap? The union allows disconnect without being a clamp based fitting. Don't put any kind of sealing compound on the furnco - rubber doesn't like chemicals.


1

Standard septic tracing dyes are non-toxic (important becasue you are dumping them into wherever your sump discharges) and typically fluorescent and fairly concentrated. Green and red are common. Blue seems to be less common, but available. In your case it likely does not matter, just pick a color, put it in, and go hunting - also see if it "comes back&...


1

Programmer66 has some good suggestions. Some others: Be sure the entire area around the sump basin, including where the perforated pipes connect, is immersed in washed rock (all the way to the footings in the corner). This essentially creates one large drainage area, and any water should find its way into the pipe without any further puncturing of the sump ...


1

Some of the reasons might be: The height is needed for the float which contains the switch to rise to a vertical position to turn the pump on. If the pump was in a shallow hole, the float would not turn on until the water level in the room was 22" above the pump. Also if the sump basin is too shallow, the pump would turn on and off more often. This ...


1

Two things: It allows room for the inlet(s) to the sump pit. If the pit were too shallow the water might backup into the inlet pipe before the pump switches on. It gives the pump a bit of "buffer" when you have sudden surges of inlet water. If you didn't have that, it might overflow before the pump turns on and gets a flow going. Also, check ...


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