20

Another answer by Fresh Codemonger suggests having two pumps, one on regular power and the other on your inverter. I would like to suggest a similar option that I think is more efficient. As the other answer says, you should have a second pump. However, instead of connecting it to your inverter, your second pump should be one that is designed to run ...


10

You didn't indicate your location or site characteristics (slope, hillside, etc), but the location of the country, even generally could be helpful, but not required. You indicated the water bill was not high, so it could not be a water leak. That would only be if the leak was after the meter. However, the leak could be before the meter and impossible to ...


10

I think the easier thing to do is to have two sump pump connected. The first on household power and the second on your battery. The first would have a start sensor at a lower spot than the battery sump sensor. This way the battery one only runs if the water reaches above a high spot. This will also give the added benefit that if the household sump pump ...


9

I'm not a sump pump expert, but it sounds like perhaps your check valve isn't working properly. If it isn't closing fully then water in the pipe can drain back down into the sump when the pump stops. If enough water is able to drain back down then it would cause the pump to start again. Assuming you actually have a check valve, it probably looks something ...


5

There used to be an exception to the code, that said that a sump pump didn't have to be on a GFCI if it was on a dedicated circuit, and it was connected using a single receptacle*. And by "single receptacle" they meant a non-duplex receptacle. One like this... With that said, "officially" there should be no problem with having a sump pump on a GFCI ...


5

Approximately never. If you notice things growing in there or bugs breeding, a bit of soap (liquid dish detergent would be my first choice) will usually do in the bugs by altering the surface tension, and chlorine bleach will kill off bacterial slimes if there's not too much water flow (so it stays put for a while.) If there is water flow it should never ...


5

You should be concerned with wanting to be concerned about things that are not problems, if you're going to be concerned about anything, here. Not that difficult - the local-to-your-sump-pit groundwater source level has receded below the floor of the sump pit. The groundwater has moved to refill local groundwater stores and is no longer high enough to enter ...


5

You don't want to do that. An inverter powerful enough to start a sump pump will also have high standby losses. It will burn your battery down in short order. When you're dealing with a 12V system this small, you want all the loads to be DC. It might be tolerable if you only spun up the inverter for the second per day the pump was actually in ...


5

The check valve is there to prevent backflow from the discharge pipe (which is usually vertical as it leaves the sump) from filling or partially filling the sump well back up. There are two main failure modes for a check valve - stuck closed and stuck open. If the check valve is stuck closed, then the sump pump will not discharge the water when it runs. ...


5

With the two in series you will be protected against one valve being stuck open. I don't think it's necessary and I wouldn't install two in series but since one is already there, no sense in having to change the plumbing by removing the old one.


5

It's likely that the flexible output hose is interfering with the pump float. When you close the lid the hose flexes into an S shape, laying on top of the float. The best solution is to eliminate the flexible hose in that area and replace it with rigid pipe, but you can also secure the hose in such a way that it can't settle like that. Make sure the lid is ...


4

If you have the clearance, you could put an air admittance valve at the high point of the drain. I'm not sure of the code on that, but since this isn't for a drain into the waste stack, it might be permitted. I would be reluctant to put it in a blind location though.


4

Sizing the Inverter If you want to run an appliance like a sump pump from an inverter, you need to make sure that you get one that's large enough. The pump will be rated according to how many amps it draws (probably in the range of 5 or 6, based on a quick internet check). However, when an AC motor starts it uses a much higher current, maybe 2x as much. ...


4

It all depends on several things. What size is the circuit? What else is one it? What do the manufacturer's instructions say? Typically you'd only need a dedicated circuit for something like this if it is big enough to warrant it, or if the mfg requires it. When I say big enough I mean 50% of the circuit size since you are combining a fixed in place ...


4

In most cases an extra sump pit is pure plumber profit - if the sump is not tiny, the backup pump can use the same sump, and just be set to come on at a higher water level. The practical problem with your vision of "a battery with a 110V outlet" (battery charger, battery, and inverter) is that is entirely possible, but wickedly expensive; also, batteries ...


4

It appears to me that your problem is that the ice maker drain is BELOW the trap. So anytime there is water at that level, gravity will draw it into your ice maker drain. I think you'd be better off locating the in the vertical section of sink drain ABOVE the trap.


3

You could certainly perforate the lower section of the sump basin with small holes (1/4 inch/6mm or less would be my preference, but some might go twice/3 times as large - depends in part what you are bedding it in) Outside the basin, you'd want washed stone (depending on soil type, possibly filter fabric and washed stone) Inside the basin, a concrete ...


3

There are typically "sliders" or some sort of adjustment that mark the "start" and "stop" (or "high" and "low") water levels. Generally there's no minimum low-water level other than you want to make sure that there is always water covering the pump intake (so it doesn't suck air). The "high" mark just needs to be low enough that water never gets out of the ...


3

Contact three or four local drainage contractors and ask if they will come out and give you a quote to solve the problem. You'll learn what methods they would employ, their guarantee, and cost. Then you can make an informed decision.


3

A battery backup sump pump is a device with a very limited scope of benefits - for a short power outage, the capacity of the sump itself will be adequate until power comes on again. For some particular scope of power outage and water flow a battery backup that's actually working well will keep you dry, and then for longer power outages or higher water flows ...


3

Thanks everyone for the feedback and tips! Turns out I was able to get a clear answer by calling the sewer company: 1) They looked at their recent scopes and confirmed that our property does indeed have two sewer laterals. They also observed some corrosion and decided to come out and take a look. 2) They brought a truck out to our house and performed a ...


3

looks like you have a hole in your pit liner. but its doing its job its still removing water from under the foundation as it should. however i advise you to call a reputable drain inspection service to do a video inspection of the footing drain those are the two pipes you see entering the pit. if water is leaking into the pit from a hole in the plastic ...


3

Letter I in that diagram, the primary pump check valve, is your problem. It is either missing or not operating correctly. The water being discharged by the backup pump is draining out the inlet of the primary pump. Also, the primary pump check valve needs to located below the wye fitting and above the primary pump like it is in the diagram. If it is above ...


3

Pumps where the pump mechanism (the impeller) is above the water line must be primed. So there is water in the impeller and no big airbubbles in the inlet pipe. If this is not the case then you can damage the pump. You'll need a non-return valve at the inlet to prime it but if it leaks then you cannot keep the pump primed for any extended amount of time. ...


3

I have a sump pump that I use with a garden hose. It works great but has a slightly reduced flow capacity. If that size works for you, use it. My greatest concern would be exposure of the pipe to the cold climate. If it freezes, it will not flow water. The smaller pipe (hose) will put more "head" on the pump but should not cause any harm to your pump. As far ...


2

In theory, yes, you could, however you'll need to pay very close attention to the current draw and locked rotor amperage of the sump pump motor. If you've got a couple marine type batteries hooked up in parallel that can handle a 7.5 A or so drain for the 15 seconds it may take to clear the bilge, then you should be in the clear. I don't think I'd consider ...


2

Newer sump pumps have larger openings for the impeller. If your has gravel at the bottom like mine then you need something under it to prevent damage


2

I would favor a strategy that maximizes reliability. I would go for a pump that is rated at double the estimated worst case flow. That will mean there is a margin of safety and also mean the pump is not running at full capacity. This will be better for a longer life, as friction and heat are an electric motors worst enemies. This may be hard to estimate, ...


2

Yes, this is definitely home improvement material. What's the terrain like around your house? Could you dig a trench sloping downhill from the low point in your basement to "daylight" (ie, somewhere, like a ditch the water could drain away to without a pump?) As for it getting worse, could something have clogged up to cause more water to come in - your ...


2

I would not want to see 12 inches of standing water close to the slab grade in a sump pit. My first thought would be to see if you could adjust the float of the pump to turn on much sooner and keep the level down to maybe 4 to 6 inches. There should be an upper and lower level set on the pump. it would be helpful to know the make and model of the pump so we ...


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