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The problem you have, is that two 2x4 turned on side (as you propose) will be exactly 4" thick - which is the thickness of the other 2x4 studs - which means there is no space for the wiring. Given that you only need to create room for a 6" exhaust, I think you can go for a much simpler approach: | | | * | | *** | | * | ...


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The correct way is to frame the opening with a header, jack studs(aka trimmers) and king studs in the same manner that window and door openings are framed. See image below for reference. The header is typically made of two pieces of 2x lumber face nailed together, sometimes with a piece of 1/2” plywood between the two to make the depth of the header match ...


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You can generally assume at least half a stud at corners (5/8" to 3/4" will be covered by drywall), but there are quite a few exceptions. Your best bet is to put a very small bit in your drill and gently feel for backing. A 1/16" bit is much less destructive than a nail. You can usually assume either half a plate or one and a half plates at the ceiling, ...


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In the corner of the home? It's very likely. You should hammer in a finishing nail and find out. If the corner is on a wall which separates one room from another then that wall could be dead-smack in the middle of an open bay.


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I would do exactly that using PT lumber for the plate and the extensions. You'll need a powder load gun to fasten the plate to the concrete. I would cut the extensions to go under the existing studs (tightly) and sister a piece to tie the stud and extension together. How do you plan to fix the wainscoting/paneling? My guess is you will probably end up ...


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Those are all reasonable assumptions. But, you never know for certain whether anything was built by someone who knew what they were doing. Or whether it was inspected. I'd guess those assumptions are accurate 90% of the time? Safe? Well, that depends on what you are doing in those areas. I wouldn't hang anything heavy that could fall and hurt someone if ...


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No one can tell you for sure since there are many varieties and sizes of drywall anchors. I suggest you get some anchors which have screws roughly the same diameter as your shelf screws. Then try them out in some inconspicuous spot on your wall. See if the anchors are holding firmly in the wall. You could even try mounting the shelf and testing it. ...


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