Hot answers tagged

61

This is a job for vise grips. What I would do is file the bolt flat on two sides. Don't take off so much that you significantly compromise its strength - just flatten the threads. These flat sides will enable you to grip it with a pair of large vise grips. That should provide sufficient leverage to remove the bolt. Take it a bit at a time.


35

No. Wood frame construction is generally done for rigidity not strength. You can climb a tree and have the branches deflect significantly before they break - the strength is fine - if you build a house with just strength in mind then you'd be bouncing all over the place. Wood frame construction is instead designed for rigidity such that when you walk ...


27

If the TV will be on a pivot arm the answer is absolutely not. If it will be tight to the wall, as you say, and generally nobody will be physically handling the TV (tilting or moving, e.g. to plug in game consoles or whatever) then it can be quite safe especially if you use several (4?) toggle bolts along the top edge of the bracket. You don't need them on ...


26

Say you try one of the other proposed approaches in the other answers and the screw is just stubborn and more of the shaft keeps snapping off... Consider that you might not need to remove the screw at all. In a worst case, you can almost always snap off the screw close to the base of the wall (maybe a little grinding with a rotary tool like a Dremel to fully ...


23

Those are called "finger jointed studs". These joints are weaker than regular 2x4 or 2x6. I do a lot of woodworking and when gluing boards together (for like a table top) the glue joints are actually stronger than the wood itself. But for some reason, that's not the case with finger jointed studs, they are just much weaker than the intact 2x. ...


21

You can find “straight grain” lumber, but most people don’t know how to order it and most “yards” (Home Depot, etc.) won’t order a small amount (half units, etc.). Lumber is divided into three “Grades”: boards, dimensional, and timber. Further, dimensional and timbers are graded into “light framing”, decking, beams, timbers, etc. Those grades are further ...


20

There's a few things in here so let's cover them one at a time Can I support a TV mount with only drywall? If we're talking a modern TV (i.e. a 2015+ 4k TV) then yes. I recently had my living room TV die and I bought a 65" 4k TV. It weighs perhaps 50 lbs, which is well within the tolerances of drywall using a flush-mount. I would buy either the best ...


20

I've worked through hundreds of units of framing lumber over the last 30 years, and the difference between big box lumber and "lumber yard" lumber is insubstantial, on average*. In fact, it's often better from big boxes due to higher customer expectations. The local HD competition were actually forced to raise their lumber quality to compete on ...


19

I would just clamp my drill's chuck on that puppy and spin it out.


18

Yes. They can be however far apart the builder wants them. I have used 3-4 studs within 16" when doing bathrooms, high traffic corner, in bathrooms for showers... and have installed an extra stud because of a previous mistake. I only use magnetic stud finder (finds your screws). If you use a method and you just aren't 100% sure the best thing to do ...


15

You are looking at tree sap. It's harmless. It's dried out so if it's gonna cause you to lose sleep at night, just scrape it off with a chisel.


15

Another possible strategy; if you can get 2 nuts onto the threaded bar and turn them against each other they will practically lock into each other, this should allow you then to use a regular spanner, shifter or vice grips to loosen and remove the bolt. Make sure your only turning the first nut and not the second or the effect is lost. If you have it a ...


14

Studs are cut to length at the mill so you can build your 8’ walls without cutting the ends off the top and bottom plates with studs make a quick tilt up wall, the rest is true 8’ 10’ 12’ . Note if remodeling verify length prior to building a wall.


14

OK, the yellow anchors do not go into the studs. They can be used in drywall, brick, masonry, etc when the proper size hole is drilled. Those big threaded anchors are for drywall. They have a sharp point and you screw them into the wall with a Phillips screwdriver and tighten them up so they indent a little into the drywall. Then one of your smaller silver ...


14

Metal studs? Welcome to the world of the "self-drilling sheet metal screw" Image from "Albanycountyfasteners.com" never heard of them, not associated in any way. You don't need ones with a rubber washer, but this was the first image that wasn't impossible to copy - you can get them with various head types to match your wall mount ...


11

The only case of having to replace studs and such I’m aware of is from termite/dry rot damage. A number of years ago, my 2-story California home was to be painted. Before starting, the contractor went to repair some siding panels were edges were coming lose. He peeked behind one and went “oh, crap”. He had found severe termite damage. A bunch of studs has ...


11

Some of the other answers are worth trying but IMO a 1/4" lag bolt embedded 5 inches in wood, presumably without a pilot hole, and tightened to the point the head broke off is not coming out with any reasonable effort. I'd saw it off and work around it .... 2 minutes of relatively little effort.


11

Use a plumber wrench. In general more force and better fit jaws for the task than vise grips: Edit upon comment by jay613: Since it's 5" wood. Drill a hole next to the screw, file the screw and then use the wrench. Or save the money by not buying the wrench and go for the answer by jay613 (saw or drill several holes). I also found out that it may be ...


10

TL;DR: Other options (described below) include: (1) Chuck bolt directly into drill. (2) Cut slot in bolt and use screw driver. (3) Cut flats on bolt and use socket driver. (4) Use two nuts to provide gripping surface. (5) Destructive brute force with a hammer. (5b) Destructive brute force with a crowbar. (6) Cut the bolt flush to the wall. (7) Keep the bolt ...


9

While the world won't end if it stays, the top of the stud should also be moved. It's easy to do and lazy not to. There are a few reasons: When locating the stud later for mounting photos or whatever a person would be led astray after finding the stud at one height and then trying to hit it at another. Any electrical or other hardware attached to it will ...


9

That is a join between two bits of timber. The ends are machine cut and glued.


9

16 is a typical maximum spacing, there is no restriction on having more, it just may be overbuilt. It can be quite common to encounter studs that are doubled up or have strange intervals. Common causes are framing of windows or doors, made especially strange if the window or door is no longer there. Same with changes to load bearing wall situations can leave ...


9

You are correct to hang a TV (or anything else "heavy") from a stud or other building structural member. This provides reliable support under static and dynamic loading (think: weight, moment-arm, any leaning, minor earthquakes, vibrations from door slams), and ensures the wall material does not bend or crumble or crack over time. When you use a ...


8

You appear to have 5 anchors and 3 screws. I hope this isn't much of a rack, or that you're willing to go buy some screws. Lag Bolts. The things you are referring to as drywall screws appear to be screw-in drywall anchors, which then take a normal screw in the center of the anchor. They hold fairly well for a drywall anchor, but unless it's a very small, ...


7

Use two nuts (if the thread is damaged so that you can't put any nut on, saw off a small part of the end), fasten them against each other, then use your spanner on one to turn the bolt. This is so standard a practice that it's routinely used to fasten or remove studs that don't have a bolt head to start with. :-)


6

Yes, but I'd add a few things... Firstly, I've done what you're doing many times. It will work just fine. A framed structure is a system, and there's a lot more supporting those joists than you might think. Mentally step through everything that they're connected to and you'll realize that you can almost take the studs out without doing anything else, even ...


6

That is tree sap. My Grandfather would call it Pitch. Pitch will clean very nicely with kerosene or a naptha product such as coleman fuel. It looks like it is dried out and it should not hurt anything unless you are trying to paint over it.


6

Simply surface mount the panel, then it doesn't matter what the stud spacing is behind it. You'll put a piece of plywood on the surface of the wall, screw it into the studs, then screw the panel to the plywood, and Bob's your uncle! Once you've got the surface mounted panel, you can then run a chase from floor to ceiling (thanks for the reminder, George!), ...


6

Open up wall where you want to mount the TV, add some wood crossing, re-drywall, install your kit correctly. I would go so far as adding a full wood "box" so that you have an area parallel to the metal studs that can help support the crosses.


5

Use the stud finder across a wider swath of wall. Using a pencil, removable tape, or other method mark the edges of every stud you can find, including the possible edges where the mirror should hang. Measure the spacing of several studs. Do you find two or three that are spaced the same - 16 inches, perhaps? Builders like to place the studs with consistent ...


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