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61

This is a job for vise grips. What I would do is file the bolt flat on two sides. Don't take off so much that you significantly compromise its strength - just flatten the threads. These flat sides will enable you to grip it with a pair of large vise grips. That should provide sufficient leverage to remove the bolt. Take it a bit at a time.


26

Say you try one of the other proposed approaches in the other answers and the screw is just stubborn and more of the shaft keeps snapping off... Consider that you might not need to remove the screw at all. In a worst case, you can almost always snap off the screw close to the base of the wall (maybe a little grinding with a rotary tool like a Dremel to fully ...


21

You can find “straight grain” lumber, but most people don’t know how to order it and most “yards” (Home Depot, etc.) won’t order a small amount (half units, etc.). Lumber is divided into three “Grades”: boards, dimensional, and timber. Further, dimensional and timbers are graded into “light framing”, decking, beams, timbers, etc. Those grades are further ...


20

I've worked through hundreds of units of framing lumber over the last 30 years, and the difference between big box lumber and "lumber yard" lumber is insubstantial, on average*. In fact, it's often better from big boxes due to higher customer expectations. The local HD competition were actually forced to raise their lumber quality to compete on ...


19

I would just clamp my drill's chuck on that puppy and spin it out.


15

Another possible strategy; if you can get 2 nuts onto the threaded bar and turn them against each other they will practically lock into each other, this should allow you then to use a regular spanner, shifter or vice grips to loosen and remove the bolt. Make sure your only turning the first nut and not the second or the effect is lost. If you have it a ...


11

Use a plumber wrench. In general more force and better fit jaws for the task than vise grips: Edit upon comment by jay613: Since it's 5" wood. Drill a hole next to the screw, file the screw and then use the wrench. Or save the money by not buying the wrench and go for the answer by jay613 (saw or drill several holes). I also found out that it may be ...


11

Some of the other answers are worth trying but IMO a 1/4" lag bolt embedded 5 inches in wood, presumably without a pilot hole, and tightened to the point the head broke off is not coming out with any reasonable effort. I'd saw it off and work around it .... 2 minutes of relatively little effort.


10

TL;DR: Other options (described below) include: (1) Chuck bolt directly into drill. (2) Cut slot in bolt and use screw driver. (3) Cut flats on bolt and use socket driver. (4) Use two nuts to provide gripping surface. (5) Destructive brute force with a hammer. (5b) Destructive brute force with a crowbar. (6) Cut the bolt flush to the wall. (7) Keep the bolt ...


7

Use two nuts (if the thread is damaged so that you can't put any nut on, saw off a small part of the end), fasten them against each other, then use your spanner on one to turn the bolt. This is so standard a practice that it's routinely used to fasten or remove studs that don't have a bolt head to start with. :-)


5

The problem with today’s lumber it comes off much smaller trees and unless #2 or better kiln dried it can look like what you are finding. Today to get what you have you basically have to purchase vertical grain lumber (way expensive). Sometimes it gets mixed in the sorter but you have do dig through a unit to find it if the mill does both like mine. In any ...


4

You are correct that "two-by" lumber is standard fare for ceilings. What you're missing is that "two-by" lumber is actually 1-1/2" wide. 1-by is 3/4" wide. 2-by is 1-1/2" wide. 4-by is 3-1/2" wide. Other sizes, subtract 3/4". And manufacturers don't make products that require 2" wide studs. That would imply ...


4

One option is to use a hacksaw or a rotary tool with a cutting wheel to carve a groove into the end of the bolt, effectively turning it into a flathead screw. You can then use a regular screwdriver to back it out. If the end of the bolt is boogered up too badly, it might help to file it smooth first. You have 5 inches of screw firmly anchored into a stud ...


3

A small (10 inch) pipe wrench should make quick work of this situation. It's designed to literally grab onto smooth round steel tubes.


3

this bolt is made of weak metal. you have to be very careful. use a small diameter metal pipe. carefully bend the bolt towards the wall. Slide the pipe over the bolt and rotate counterclockwise. when bending the bolt, heat it if there is a tool for this. this will reduce the chance of the bolt breaking.


3

So my question is, do they still produce 2x3" studs that are straight? Yes. The better question is - Who is "they"? Straight lumber is plentiful and cheap in Canada, for example. It's important to understand that pricing and availability of quality lumber in the United States has long followed the ups and downs of the Canada/US Softwood ...


3

Without 'fixing the system' haha, one approach you can use to try and mitigate the worst of it, at your local Hope Depot, lay the boards down on the store floor, on all sides and see which ones are the straightest. It doesn't completely fix the problem but it does help mitigate and reduce the worst of it. It helps if they've just refilled the wood of course ...


3

Most stud finders aren't that accurate within an 1/8 to 1/4" of the stud, so when you're measuring 1", the stud is probably 1-1/2", the narrow end of a 2x4. I always get the exact location of a stud buy getting the approximate location with a stud finder and then punching a few holes in the ceiling with a small Phillips screwdriver to each ...


2

That crack looks fine to me. From the image it looks to be mostly superficial... I might drill a pilot hole if the screw is going dead center where the crack is, just to make sure the crack doesn't widen. If you want to err on the safe side, you can get another 2x4 stud and nail it to the side of the existing, cracked stud (this is called sistering) with ...


2

Yes, the "HD Prime" stuff is usually quite terrible. Even if you find a straight piece you better use it that same day or else it will warp and bow by the end of the week. My Home Depot sells premium Burrill brand lumber. For me, 9 out of 10 boards at the store are straight and will stay straight for weeks. HD Prime is more like a 2/10 and I've ...


2

Channel-Lock Or Vice-Grip Groove-Lock pliers will take care of this.


2

If one Googles "deep leg deflection track" one may see a photo like this one: There is a way to use this type of track to build a floating frame but I don't fully understand it and therefore don't want to spread misinformation. Per FreeMan's suggestion I reached out to the inspector. He recommended using slotted track instead. This seems to be the ...


1

Search for ceiling fan joist hangers - sound like that would be perfect for what you need.


1

First try the vise grip and it might unscrew it. If not, cut it off near the surface and then use a good drill bit designed to drill metal and slightly larger in diameter to the bolt and drill it down to slightly below surface so your spackle patch repair is seamless.


1

My preference is Lowes over HD, but I'd assume they're basically the same. When I go to get lumber, I bring gloves because I know I'll be moving a lot of wood to get something decent. I'd guess that on average I only take about 50% of the boards, sheet or dimensional, that I pick up to look at. That said, we built a shed last summer and, due to the quantity ...


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