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31

I recently had the same issue and tried numerous solutions with no luck. In the end I purchased a strap wrench: This kind of wrench grips the object via a strap or a chain: You basically put the strap around the chuck, tighten the strap and then use the wrench handle as a lever to gain more torque while trying to undo chuck. This worked extremely well. I ...


16

I've had this happen when hammer drilling as well and I put the drill in reverse and stuck the drill back in one of the holes. This was able to loosen the hammered death grip the chuck had and I could easily remove it. Although, if you do it too long it might remove the drill bit from the chuck.


15

Try the following "low-intensity" method: Apply WD-40 (or other similar "penetrating" lubricant?) generously to the maw of the chuck. With a small hammer, gently tap different points on the chuck's surface, from different angles. Nothing that would cause a dent, just slight mechanical vibrations. Might help lube seepage. Wait a while (an ...


9

You should be able to trip the latch, if you can see what you say you see - there should be something coming from the latch side which can be pulled or manipulated (often rotated, as that's what the knob would do) to do that. If the hardware is really fouled up, a slim prybar next to the latch between the door and frame will often find enough flex in the ...


5

The type of plastic drywall anchor that you show on those screws can be removed by holding the anchor with a pair of pliers and then back out the screw with a philips screwdriver. After the plastic part has been removed toss it into the trash. Note that that type of anchor is not suitable for hanging a wall shelf unless that shelf is a piddly small thing ...


4

This isn't a recent post but I thought my experience might help someone. I had a similar situation where the knobs were off but the latch wouldn't release. It seems the transmission plate came unattached from the latch somewhere inside the mechanism, so sliding it back with a screwdriver did nothing. I tried to take the door off the hinges but it wouldn't ...


4

I see bits in there that you should be able to catch with a screwdriver and slide to the right. Next time, use a passage lockset intended for closets (which has no locking feature at all) or a privacy lockset intended for bathrooms (which is unlocked with a simple hole in the center of the knob that you jab with a skewer).


4

I have had success using a jemmy bar (or crow bar) to "load" the bolt while turning it with a spanner or socket, this gives much more pull than just pulling with pliers.


4

A set of bolt-cutters of an appropriate size should be able to cut that shackle without too much trouble. It appears to be a relatively cheap lock. Alternatively you could also easily cut either or both of the eyes that the lock is holding. Those are just bent mild steel.


4

You could pry open the loop of the screw-eye using vise-grips. The screw-eye above the door handle looks the easiest and most accessible. Just make a strong grip near the cut end, then twist the vise-grip to roll open the loop. With the door open you can dismantle everything. If the garage needs continued security, have your new locking mechanisms ready to ...


4

Turn the adjusting knob on the locking pliers so that it takes both hands to clamp them shut on the screw head and squashes some small flats into the screw head when shut. Hold your locking pliers flat against the wall Clamp them shut Unscrew You want the pliers so tight that you can barely get them clamped. That will get you the maximum grip on the screw ...


4

This might sound like a ridiculous "one simple trick..." but ... The solution here is a strap wrench. if you don't have a strap wrench, what do you do? Put on a latex glove. Note - or any similar material, "a rubber glove" in the broad sense. It is just absolutely amazing how much gripping and indeed turning power an adult human has in ...


4

A likely possibility you have to be aware of before you up the drilling stakes - you are hitting a steel protective plate that is specifically intended to warn you off of drilling a hole right there, because there are wires or pipes too close to the edge of the stud which you might drill or screw through, causing a larger problem. Other possibilities depend ...


3

Eighteen inches of the post penetrating into the sleeve with rust most likely to be along most of the internal overlap will be next to impossible to get apart. One of the most helpful techniques for freeing rusted parts is heating the outer part so that it expands to loosen the joint - but that technique is not possible in this situation. I suggest that you ...


3

Use a knife to cut into the plaster at the base of the fixture. Then when you remove the fixture, it will come off at the cut line and not pull any ceiling plaster off with it.


3

Go buy a new wax seal (well, ideally step aside as the plumber hired by the responsible parent comes and sorts this out, but I guess that's asking for too much.) Swab out all the water you can, unbolt and remove the toilet; plug the open pipe with something you won't forget to remove before you replace the toilet - typically a rag and a plastic bag, to ...


3

Quite possibly. I have cranked on spouts like that and had them release, and had them fold up and crumble, since it was old pot metal. A grinder would be a good way to go about it. The connection, if it is as you say, will be in about 3" in. The rough in for a connection like that is usually 4" to 4 1/8" to the end of the male adapter, so a cut about 3" ...


3

Basically apply more force. They may break, depending how jammed they are - they are cheap zinc castings most of the time. The screws they connect to are usually steel so they are likely to survive, and you can get replacement cams (or join the "my knockdown furniture is missing a few cams" club, which is large and not exclusive.) You might try the trick ...


3

Have you tried a strong magnet? Most of my drivers that use those small bits hold them in place with a magnet so the bit becomes magnetic. A strong magnet may take it right out where shaking won’t.


3

Yes pull harder. The plastic has some flex but because it is “straight” it is kind of spring loaded pushing it self back.


3

Had the exact same problem with a similar drill. Could not get anywhere, until I realized that front grip has a tightening mechanism. So I removed the grip from the normal use position, and used the mechanism to tighten it good around the chuck grip instead. Gave me the exact leverage I needed to open it. It's a similar solution to using the strap wrench by ...


2

Yup, not uncommon. You could try cutting it like this: Then soak the threaded "boss" real good and carefully slice it with a hacksaw, preserving the threads underneath. I have had some success with this and it allowed speedy replacement without changing the wall nipple. Although if the nipple is not brass you should make efforts to get rid of it. When ...


2

See if a careful knife or razor blade might pop it off, the spring clamps could be pretty strong. If that fails to widen the gap, then it's a screw-on cap. You'll need to treat it like a faucet aerator that you don't want to scratch, by wrapping the cap with cloth, leather, rubber, plastic or even liberal tape & take big (long) pliers to it. It should be ...


2

Typically you are supposed to remove the knobs with door already open. On some sets you can install the knob with the stub ( I:E: the part that is shaped like a half circle that goes through the hole in the latch of the same shape ) without depressing the latch from the side of the door but some require you to press in the latch. Try to put in the knob ...


2

Following up on how I've resolved this and what was the issue. At the time of this post I've tried everything that was suggested and the clamping screw did not bulge at all. However, I did not had access to was pneumatic tools in my shop at home, so I went to a local tool store and they dislodged the clamping screw for me. They explained to me my mistake ...


2

The shower head side would appear to have wrenching flats so normally one would use an adjustable wrench on that side. Someone has used pliers and badly scored the surface so if you want to discard the head, then just do the same. On the supply pipe I use pliers over a rag. It appears that Teflon tape was used to seal the threads, but normally sealing these ...


2

I would not try to find parts if you have acces to the connections. I would convert to pex then install a new frost free faucet. Replacement if you know EXACTLY what parts to buy, with the proper tools on hand, and a single trip to the parts store should take around an hour. Fixing your existing frostfree, locating parts, turning the main on and off, ect ...


2

Your shower faucet handle appears to be made of metal. Heat the metal by soaking it in hot water for a while. Then try unscrewing the sleeve. The heated metal should expand making the threads looser. Be careful to avoid buring yourself with hot metal.


2

I'll answer my own question. I resolved this by whacking the heck out of the drive hub with a hammer using "rust buster" penetrating oil in all the cracks eventually, i had to drill out one of the stuck screws then finally, I split the center piece in half with a metal chisel Summary: Brute force removal method. Good thing I had already bought a ...


2

Left hand drill bit and bolt extractor. The idea being you drill a hole in the center of your lag screw shaft, drilling in a counter clockwise direction which will avoid driving the shaft in deeper, once you have your hole in the shaft you use the extractor again in a counter clockwise direction which threads the extractor into the bolt shaft and the ...


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