74

The opening you want to create has to be framed like a window as shown*. Notice the addition of a header to carry the load of the cut stud (cripple stud) to the sides, and the added jack studs which support the header. Because you're only supporting a light weight cabinet rather than a window, you probably don't need the double sill (single will do). As ...


47

I always wonder “what else is wrong” when there are so many obvious errors. You’ve noted the obvious problems, but you’ve probably missed some major items that are not so obvious: In Picture #1 you’ve noted the gap issue, but missed the “double spliced sole plate”. (Splices are to be a minimum of 4’ apart, unless at intersection of a wall.) In Picture #1 ...


28

It is absolutely UNSAFE! - this will damage the structural integrity of the wall! The load in a load-bearing stud wall is carried by the studs. Your options are: Surface mount the cabinet Flush mount the cabinet between studs Cut the stud and insert a beam to carry the load from the stud to the two studs either side. You will need to reinforce each side ...


23

It's probably a good time to review the contract you entered with the framers. Does it allow you to withhold payment until defects are resolved? Does it stipulate how claimed defects are to be resolved? Do what the contract requires of you to ensure that you don't end up in breach too. There appears to be a pattern of careless work and failure to abide the ...


16

Yes, that is shoddy work! Did you pay for shoddy work or did you pay for quality work? But things like this turn into squeaks, cracks, wobbles, etc. over time. So yes, if this was MY project I would get them back in to do it properly!


16

Horrible work. I don't think "I commissioned an independent review" will hold any weight with the contractor, unless the contract allowed for that. The contractor might dispute the qualifications of your reviewer. Instead, I would contact the local city planning office (who gave you the planning permission), and ask them for an inspection. If they say that ...


14

The framing above the pantry door is not load bearing. The doorway to the left of the pantry in the middle picture is load bearing. You can tell by the solid header.


13

Good on you for leveling up your knowledge and learning where not to drill or saw on joists. On that same note, here's an excellent summary from BuildingAdvisor titled Guide to Notching and Boring Joists: Don’t make any holes with a diameter greater than 1/3 the depth of a joist. No holes closer than 2 inches to the top or bottom edge. No holes closer than ...


12

Can I safely remove one stud from a load bearing wall? Yes, but you need to properly support the gap with a header. If you aren't willing to do this then don't remove the stud, period. Will this damage the integrity of the bearing wall? Without a header you are technically compromising the integrity of whatever the wall is holding up. At best the floor ...


10

The post looks reasonably adequate as it was originally built even by modern standards. If it wasn't you'd have seen disaster long ago, when it first started to decay. To maintain the style detail I'd rebuild to match, using pressure-treated lumber. By doing so you eliminate the need to cut that notch and you end up with a more robust post. A single post ...


10

Structural engineer and former carpenter and contractor here. Check your plan general notes for your code and other criteria to which your contractor's quality of work must meet. Discuss with your building official, or a local structural engineer for advice and direction. From what I see in your pictures after a very quick precursory review, it appears ...


10

The general term for a hinge that allows something to move but keep the same orientation is a "pantograph hinge". The general term for that type of bed would be a "Murphy bed". The pantograph mechanism takes many forms, but the trick it uses is to have parallel connecting rods that pivot together so that the door or shelf that it is connected to can swing ...


9

Yes, and I'd question your town inspector as to whether or not that would pass. You're looking at loads of problems down the way. Birdsmouth cuts are a PITA but after you do them a few hundred times they're easier. No excuse. And every single one of those 2x4s that aren't framed solid are going to move in time, causing cracks, settling, squeaks, and ...


5

You’re lucky, sort of... First, the joists are 1 5/8” x 7 1/2” not 1 1/2” x 7 1/4” if the house was built in the 1940’s. Second, the joists are not Redwood (thank goodness) they’re Douglas fir. Third, I’d classify them as No. 1 or Select Structural grade. (There’s only one grade better: Dense Select Structural.) Fourth, those hairline horizontal lines ...


5

These are larger than 2x6 joists. That plays in your favor. A notch in a 2x6 is disastrous. The beams look OK for now. The cracks are horizontal so they're not concerning. Those can be caused by the drying of the boards or settling, and they could predate the notches. Your best bet is to reroute the pipes and full sister the beam . It has the least ...


5

A "flush beam" is on plane at the bottom with the joists it supports. The joists will typically be supported in one of two ways: Using steel joist hangers attached to the beam: source By resting on the beam with an engineered bearing point protrusion, often consisting of a doubled 2x4 top chord or single upright top chord. source


5

I would say it's a little more than what's normally considered OK, but it isn't going to make the shed collapse or anything like that. It's going to make for gaps in the corners, trim might not fit quite right, stuff like that, but probably not an issue for a home built shed. I would weigh the aggravation of fixing it against the aggravation of working ...


5

Licensed and insured contractor, been building homes for the last decade or so. That beam in the last Pic is sitting on lvl studs, not plywood. They're much stronger than regular 2x material and that strap is kinda hiding the end of the top plate but technically all it needs is 3/4" bearing to be structurally sound. That gap in pantry king stud, while ugly, ...


5

The mechanism - GRAVITY What keeps it stable - High quality materials and balanced weighting in the design. What is it? It is a high quality metal shelf with an extended arm on each side of the back. Why does it look cool? Because the arm rotation is solid yet flowing and they hid the joint inside of the side of the bed. If it stuck out it would ...


5

You'll need an onsite review by a structural engineer to determine the answer. Old houses can and are framed in many different ways and there are no rules (unless this house has been updated with pre-manufactured trusses). Often ceiling joists bear on walls when the roof rafters do not. Also, there are often intermediate framing members for bracing of the ...


4

I'd be using stainless steel deck screws or stainless steel lag screws.


4

Yes, there is a chance that the wall could be a bearing wall. You can determine if it’s a bearing wall by verifying if 1) the wall is near the middle of the house, 2) has roof joists resting on it, 3) has a beam or concrete footing under it, 4) has plywood, OSB board or double gypsum board on either side of the wall. 1) If the wall is near the middle of ...


4

That stub wall does likely provide some support to stiffen the stairway. That said it would appear that the vertical stud that you circled in purple could be removed without any trouble. I would not suggest removing any other parts and leaving the horizontal double member in place. If you removed that it would leave a mess in regards to the already ...


3

I cringe when I see this type of construction. How good are you at mixing concrete? I'd be digging out that area under the bay window, compacting it, adding a few reinforcing rods into the existing foundation, a little framing and pour a 6" slab/footer. Then use your jacks to slowly raise or even over raise the window, cinderblock and morter it in and cover ...


3

I've done this with a beam, in a fully engineered solution. You mount the beam (or header in your case) above the existing joists, and use long joist hangers to hang the joists from the new beam. Then you can knock out the existing supports. Caveats: The new header/beam must be properly tied into the structure, hence the need for an engineer and a permit....


3

If we're talking about any sort of engineered joist (truss, TJI), stop reading now and consult a local engineer. This answer assumes solid 2x10 lumber. I'm guessing that you don't mean a header so much as a joist fit between the sistered joists alongside. Since the span is so short (presumably 32" or less), you can use a single joist of the same height as ...


2

In case someone finds this question later, MiTek (who makes USP hangers and ties, similar to Simpson), has a technical bulletin illustrating the screw placement and minimum clearances for different 2x dimensions when attaching a ledger board to studs, with or without gypsum board:


2

Yes, you can remove the 2x3 stud wall. There is 1) single top plate, 2) no plywood for shear wall construction, 3) no hold-downs for uplift or “racking” considerations, 4) the steel posts are close enough together to support 17 train locomotives (well, a significant load). 2x3’s are not used for structural walls. Is that an adjustable cap on that steel ...


2

You have several issues to consider: 1) span of steel beam vrs. wood beam, 2) weight of steel beam vrs. wood beam, 3) connectors, 4) ease of connecting joists to wood beam vrs. steel beam, 5) ease of installing wood post vrs. steel post, 6) size of footing under posts. 1) Yes, steel beams can be smaller than wood beams when carrying the same load and ...


2

Yes, there is chance a studded wall is a supporting wall.


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