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25

This is often a complex legal situation due to regulations that affect (in many parts of the world) what you can do in or near a body or stream of water even if the land next to it or around it belongs to you; not to mention the fact that you are fighting with a force that has literally shaped the planet, and it's inexorable and quite capable of undoing many ...


16

Legal issues aside (that's not our pigeon here), a reliable way is dry mix sand bagging:- Pick a low quality concrete sans water, place it at your leisure and let the rain /moisture make it go off. It's a common civil engineering technique, and very efficient in terms of cost, effort and design experience. It also requires very little ground preparation, ...


14

The framing above the pantry door is not load bearing. The doorway to the left of the pantry in the middle picture is load bearing. You can tell by the solid header.


13

As mentioned in another answer, there may be legal issues since the creek is a waterway. In the US, you would have Federal and probably state laws involved (many other countries have similar laws about waterways, even if you own the property). I would not try to fill the creek bed back in without approval, even if it is technically your property. What you ...


10

The post looks reasonably adequate as it was originally built even by modern standards. If it wasn't you'd have seen disaster long ago, when it first started to decay. To maintain the style detail I'd rebuild to match, using pressure-treated lumber. By doing so you eliminate the need to cut that notch and you end up with a more robust post. A single post ...


8

Been there , done that; my creek ( Plum Creek, Highland IN) was 30ft. width and embankment was 40 ft. high. I "coated" it with railroad ties, bricks, and many cuttings of trees and bushes. To reach my height I used 3 tiers of RR ties with slopes between. It required a lot of stuff and work. Yours looks much more manageable. Look for affordable rip-rap ;aka ...


7

What I’ve seen commonly done is either large rocks or large chunks of concrete dumped to protect the area eroding. You say it is slow moving, so I’m betting the erosion primarily happens during/after rains causing high, fast moving water. I think you’ll want pretty large rocks/concrete at the base (like maybe 2.5’ or 3’). If you own the other side, you can ...


6

No. The front of your closets are not load bearing. The back of them could be - probable. Upon updates of the red Xs... Left one (front) - no way in the world unless it is a metal beam (it isn't). Right one (side of closet) - 99.9% chance no. When you open it up you can double check by looking at header.


5

If the rest of the joists are sagging, the answer is pretty clear. They should be sistered also. Joists sagging badly enough to create a visible depression are in danger of failure (or at least must bounce with comical severity). Post some photos if you'd like more specific advice.


5

Sometimes framing of a short internal wall that TEE's into an exterior wall is braced that way if the exterior wall is: The exterior wall extends a long distance on either side of the TEE And the exterior wall is parallel to ceiling joists and floor joists And has a high gable end wall above this area. Intention was to eliminate a lot of flex in the ...


5

Sigh. Cheap builders are forever spending thousands on concrete, but unwilling to spend a few hundred on steel to make the concrete properly reenforced. Nobody sees the steel, but the lack of it does show up eventually. Unlikely to be a major issue, might be a path for water or bugs, so probably sealing it would be best. But consulting an engineer is good ...


5

A "flush beam" is on plane at the bottom with the joists it supports. The joists will typically be supported in one of two ways: Using steel joist hangers attached to the beam: source By resting on the beam with an engineered bearing point protrusion, often consisting of a doubled 2x4 top chord or single upright top chord. source


4

Most things we build are rectangular, and rectangular structures are prone to racking, which is illustrated in this drawing of a deck, but the same problem affects your rectangular shelves: As you see a structure can collapse due to racking if the joints flex without tearing apart. There are various ways to counter racking. Other shapes, like ...


4

I’d check: 1) roof framing, 2) top plate, 3) sole plate fasters, 4) wall sheathing 1) If the roof framing is identical over the “no wall” area as the “wall to be removed” area, then I’d assume it is not a load bearing wall. 2) If there’s a single top plate at the wall to be removed, then that would give additional indication that it’s not load bearing. ...


4

Adding to some already good answers, I'd emphasize using vegetation to help stabilize the bank. Only one answer (https://diy.stackexchange.com/a/162118/76258 - a great one) mentioned that so far. My construction experience is limited but I have seen streambank stabilization done in various forestry operations. Vegetation and riprap is the key technique ...


4

Yeah, that wasn't very smart of them. Fixing the stucco is likely a bandage for the issue they created here. You'll have to move the vents and then sister a beam on both sides of the cut. First, get two construction jacks to raise the beams back to level. Next, sistering involves buying some new boards that are the same size as the cut ones. Then you ...


4

As with any structure you need to define the loads on it (wind, snow, furniture, people etc) and from there define the structure or framing capable of supporting those loads. There may well be local codes or regulations that need to be respected as well. Since this does look like a neat design, why not check out a local structural engineer or architect to ...


4

I'd be using stainless steel deck screws or stainless steel lag screws.


4

Yes, there is a chance that the wall could be a bearing wall. You can determine if it’s a bearing wall by verifying if 1) the wall is near the middle of the house, 2) has roof joists resting on it, 3) has a beam or concrete footing under it, 4) has plywood, OSB board or double gypsum board on either side of the wall. 1) If the wall is near the middle of ...


3

Sure you can fix this, but I wouldn’t opt for the “shelf” idea. Typically, in a post and beam foundation, all loads are transferred directly to the soil. Installing a “shelf” will put thrust on the foundation wall. Obviously the foundation is marginal and I doubt the wall is designed for any horizontal thrust. You’ll be pouring several “pad” footings, so ...


3

First off that's an amazing question! Most codes would frown upon touching the top or the bottom of a joist in this fashion. That being said it's probably totally fine to make a tiny hole in the manner you are describing. I've seen some awful things done that caused no problems and if I saw your scenario on a job I wouldn't even notice. edit 2.5" is ...


3

Temporary braces are nailed to the face of the wall, not fit into it. That was intended as a structural member by the carpenter. That said, it's almost certainly not critical. The entirety of the other nearby walls and the roof structure likely provide many times what that one brace does in diagonal support. Also, you don't see that technique used anymore. ...


3

I'm going to be contrary. Looking at the Weyerhaeuser documentation ( https://www.weyerhaeuser.com/woodproducts/document-library/document_library_detail/tj-9000/ ) PG 26 shows you the allowable hole locations. For parallam beams, it's in the center third of the depth and center third of the span. Your holes violate both of those conditions. They don't ...


3

Yes, those posts are probably supporting the beam (above). You’ll need to determine the load on the beam, size of existing beam, span from post(s) to wall, and location of footings. The post without the metal base connector may just be decorative...to match the other post. However, either hire an architect or structural engineer OR submit more info ...


3

The windows themselves will not be structural, and in your case the wood in the middle between the 2 columns will not be either. I see in the picture the rafters over the windows appear to be the same dimension as the rafters of the rest of the ceiling. those rafters have no additional support under them so it is safe to assume that the rafters over the ...


3

I see two issues here, and I'd have some significant concerns. 1. Fixing What You See Repairing these rafters is no big deal, but it looks like there's no access to the space to get to the broken rafters. You'd likely have to remove and replace the ceiling drywall to repair the rafters, and if that's the case, that's kind of a big deal. It's easy ...


3

Not sure where you are, but definitely check with some local authorities, such as your state (if in the US) Department of Natural Resources or equivalent, or the federal Natural Resources Conservation Service. Most modifications will need some sort of permit, and a lot of places have programs available to help landowners with such issues- I know us in the ...


3

I’m glad “you’re going to consult a professional.” I’m sure he’ll check: 1) that all the trusses are identical, including the connectors, 2) there are no additional loads on the trusses over the kitchen area, like air conditioner, etc., 3) the floor beam is just for floor loading, (the wall does not need to sit directly over the beam in order to transfer ...


3

I've done this with a beam, in a fully engineered solution. You mount the beam (or header in your case) above the existing joists, and use long joist hangers to hang the joists from the new beam. Then you can knock out the existing supports. Caveats: The new header/beam must be properly tied into the structure, hence the need for an engineer and a permit....


3

I cringe when I see this type of construction. How good are you at mixing concrete? I'd be digging out that area under the bay window, compacting it, adding a few reinforcing rods into the existing foundation, a little framing and pour a 6" slab/footer. Then use your jacks to slowly raise or even over raise the window, cinderblock and morter it in and cover ...


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