Hot answers tagged

3

3-prong outlets are obsolete and very dangerous. Specifically, the appliance industry lobbied NFPA to allow bootlegging ground on dryers and ranges, on the logic that these sockets are rarely disturbed. However, This means an ordinary failure in the neutral wire electrifies the chassis of the appliance. As such, any failure in a 3-prong appliance cord is ...


3

My KitchenAid (just took it apart for cleaning, so this is fresh in my mind) looks nearly identical (except the oval burner - but instead it has a 2-section round burner) with the empty section underneath, metal part with teeth on top and burner cap on top. Without everything in place you get sparks & gas but not ignition. When I got my current cooktop ...


2

I decided to unplug the stove to see if it would stop. It did. @isherwood was closest with his suggestion because the sound was coming from near the clock housing where all the mechanical components are located. Go figure... Thank you all for your suggestions to help pinpoint the issue.


2

I would replace the outlet. For whatever reason the outlet wasn't making contact with the plug. The "jaws" of the outlet can soften up because of age and heat generated from the current flow. Pushing them closer together is just a band aid and they will probably spread apart again causing some arcing ... during Thanksgiving day or Christmas. Good luck. Also ...


2

There is no code requirement in the IRC specifying minimum distance between stove and doorway. Doesn’t make it a good idea, but it’s not banned. http://www.inspectionnews.net/home_inspection/built-in-appliances-and-systems-home-inspection-and-commercial-inspection/21577-range-distance-door.html


2

I would say it is safe to use both the induction rings and the oven provided your in-law is in the kitchen. I would not use any timer function on the oven. The main risk is the cooker starting a fire. If your in-law is in the kitchen, she will probably smell burning insulation, and be able to turn the power off, before an actual fire breaks out. I would ...


2

Yes, that appears to be a valve. Note that it can only turn 90 degrees (clockwise as it sits), constrained by the lugs on the side. The line indicates gas flow (in line with the pipe as pictured open, crossways to the pipe closed.) If it requires excessive force to operate, better to have gas shut off upstream and replace it, rather than risk breaking it. ...


2

GFCI aka RCD Water and electricity don't mix. Or rather, when they do it is often fatal. In order to help prevent problems, GFCI (Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter - common terminology in the USA) and RCD (Residual Current Device - common in many other countries) are now required in many countries, particularly for kitchen and bathroom receptacles as those ...


2

I was able to clear the blockage. I considered a number of different cleaners to see what I might use. All of them said don't use on aluminum. The gas line is aluminum. I settled on dawn dish detergent in water. Soaked it overnight from the burner side. Applied compressed air to the valve side of the gas line and it eventually blew out the obstruction.


1

The brass nut piece is in fact your gas shutoff valve. You would have to turn it clockwise to turn off the gas. The engraved line shows the position of the valve: inline with the pipe, the valve is open; perpendicular to the pipe, the valve id closed. Try turning it with more force. Good luck


1

In your several other questions, you discussed turning the range circuit breaker off while the range is not in use. For the short term, i.e. a couple of weeks, that strategy is fine. Breakers are definitely safe to use dozens of times. Can you use them thousands of times (daily for 20 years)? Maybe. It depends on the breaker's rating. A long time ago, ...


1

Electric coils that are that uneven I would replace, sooner rather than later. I have personally experienced the end of an oven element when one of the "hot spots" burnt through and it was happily arcing away. Fortunately I was in the kitchen and noticed it right away so I could shut things down, as it did not trip the breaker. I have read of the same ...


1

I suggest the following course of action: Turn off the gas supply valve. Dismantle each gas burner and dunk all the burner assemblies in a strong solution of hot water and dishwashing soap (like Joy) to remove all oil, tar and other debris. Use a steel brush to clean the metal surfaces of the burners inside and out. Rinse with water and dry with compressed ...


1

Type K has thickest wall. Example Only; 1/2 inch nominal size has a 5/8 outside diameter and a little over a half inch inside diameter 0.527-in. Type K wall is .049, Type L wall is .040 and Type M wall is .028. Thinner wall is of course easier to bend, but may not be as puncture resistant as thicker wall tubing. Copper tubing should only be used for propane (...


1

Blame whoever buried that cable in the slab for your predicament Since some nitwit thought burying a /2 SE cable in a slab was the best thing since sliced bread, your project is now in a predicament due to the lack of separate neutral and ground wires in the cable. This missing wire problem forbids you from fitting a subpanel here (as you'd need a separate ...


1

"10KA" means 10,000 amps. Is is an extreme conditions rating for the breaker. It means that if your range suddenly has a massive problem, and causes a dead short, causing thousands of amps to flow, the breaker is certified to be able to interrupt it if it's less than 10,000 Amps. If it's 20,000 amps, the breaker might not be able to interrupt it. Some ...


1

The #10 wire is too small coming from a 50 amp breaker. #10 or 10awg wire is only rated for 30 amps by code - this is why someone advised you to change to #6. Just to make sure we are talking about the same wire, there should be #6 or #8 coming from the breaker to the range. If the wire that burned off is inside the range going to let's say an element or ...


1

Wait. You are paying $32 for four #12 pigtails? No, return them, they are too small anyway. They should be #6 (if the breaker is 50A) or #8 if the breaker is 40A, unless it is a factory authorized replacement part for your exact model. I would just go to an electrical supply house with the burnt pigtail and see if they have those lugs, or better, a ...


1

The only absolute permanent way to mark glass that I know of is etching with a glass etching cream. I've used this for custom drink glasses and casserole dishes (all clear glass), but I don't know what it would look like on a black stove. It doesn't color the glass, but it would make little frosted specs all over if you sprinkled the etching over the ...


1

First of all, use a good penetrating oil. I love PB Blaster. It looks like you started with too large of a drill bit and it walked on you. You need to use a very small Pilot Point Drill Bit at first. Pilot point bits don't tend to wander as much and the smaller the bit, the better it will "grab" the surface. I would start with a 1/64" or 1/16" bit at dead ...


1

The ones from AppliancePros are what you need, except that you may need a larger gauge size (wire side) if you want to gang the two wires together. On the other side (terminal side) it's hard to tell if it 1/4 inch from the photo but they are the most common. More importantly you should investigate why it burnt in the first place. If it's an older stove I ...


1

The oven vents from a hole under one of the rear burners. If the hole is obstructed or the bowl is turned the wrong way, the heat will escape through the stove top instead of the vent. Are the drip pans covered with foil? This will cause the top to get too hot because the oven heat cannot escape. Are you using the correct size burner pans? If they are too ...


1

When I hear neutral called "common" I think someone is likening the Neutral to the concept in electronics of "Common" or "GND" or "Vss". That is wrong. There is indeed a thing like that, but it is Equipment Safety Ground, and it does not handle current except during fault conditions. Other than that, mains electrical is wired effectively as an "isolated ...


1

It is not a hazard, the complete top of the range is considered a cooking surface and that would be totally normal if the length of the standing pilot flame is as you posted and the actual cap is intact on the burner assy. UL is who determines what acceptable temp ranges are for products. From what you described, that is the standard for the front and rear ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible