Hot answers tagged

12

What is happening is called product of combustion. Somewhere around in the house or near the house someone used or opened some sort of stain, paint, varnish or comparable compound including cleaners. The molecules carry over and get mixed in with air and then burned off from open flame. If you light a candle or a lighter you will smell the same odor, ...


11

Many years ago, electrical was done without ground wires. Range/ovens need 240V for all the stuff that makes heat, and 120V for the oven light (so you can use readily available bulbs). Because of this, ranges were supplied 120/240V hot-hot-neutral. When the grounding "fad" took off, the NFPA wanted to mandate 4-wire range and dryer connections: hot-...


9

A nearly 40 year old power cord is going to be nasty. Dust, grease, possibly cracked insulation internally, possibly asbestos insulation if the "original" cord was itself recycled. All are fine unless you disturb the cord. Pulling the stove out disturbs the cord. Pulling out a stove is a fairly major operation, I would take the opportunity to completely ...


7

It is called a spade connector, or spade lug terminal. You are holding a female connector. You can purchase these at an electronics supply shop. As you might expect, they are available in a bewildering variety of styles and sizes. You might want to bring one of your connectors for identification. Some are designed to be soldered onto the end of a wire, ...


7

You can keep the existing wiring and breaker Range loads are computed from their wattage, based on the rules in NEC's Table 220.55. In particular, since 422.10(A) paragraph 4 explicitly permits range loads to be sized as per Table 220.55: Branch circuits and branch-circuit conductors for household ranges and cooking appliances shall be permitted to be in ...


6

To increase the amp rating of your circuit breaker, you almost certainly need to increase the gauge of all the wiring on that circuit. Circuit breakers are there to protect the wiring for overloading, overheating, melting the insulation, and eventually starting a fire. Typically, you have the following wire gauges (this may vary with long circuits and your ...


5

Why did they turn off the gas? To do some work? If that is the case then there is probably air in the line. The pilot orifice is small compared to the burners which means it will take longer for the air to "bleed out". Alternatively, there may be a button somewhere that you have to hold down (to get the gas flowing to the pilots) in order to light the ...


5

See table 220.55 in the NEC, as well as footnote 4 to that table: Branch-Circuit Load. It shall be permissible to calculate the branch-circuit load for one range in accordance with Table 220.55. The branch- circuit load for one wall-mounted oven or one counter-mounted cooking unit shall be the nameplate rating of the appliance. The branch-circuit ...


5

That is probably normal (with a small possibility of being a defect). The hot indicator is precisely that, and is designed to turn off only after all spots have definitely cooled. And it may not know when that is, because it may be a simple timer, rather than a temperature sensor. And it may be designed for worst case, i.e. A pot left on the burner for ...


5

Update: the stove you refer to is an outdoor gas stove. You don't even need to talk to anyone, using thas stove indoors will violate all kinds of regulations and will pose a huge safety hazard to you. There are also better ways of killing yourself than running an outdoor gas stove indoors. Unfortunately Ooni doesn't give the power of the stove on their web ...


5

Propane and Natural Gas Are Supplied at Different Pressures A propane stove orifice size is about 0.082 inches (drill size 45), but the valve on a similar stove that uses natural gas needs an orifice that is almost 0.125 inches (drill size 35). If you are running your range from propane but using the orifice for natural gas, you will get this behaviour. You ...


4

I will assume this wood stove has a proper air jacket from which heated air can be drawn? The possibility of dangerous gases infiltrating into this jacket is a valid concern and entirely dependent on the integrity of the firebox. This can only be done by careful inspection and possibly some sort of pressure test. In theory, this can be just as safe as any ...


4

Putting the stove in the corner like you propose also gives you some nice space to work with for routing the pipe up into the ceiling / roof area or out an exerior wall. Seems to me that re-routing the vent to the previous riser location is a total non-starter. Many hoods vent up into the small cabinet above the hood and your re-routed vent pipe is going ...


4

You need to use a listed insulating stovepipe anytime combustible construction is penetrated. These pipes are also listed to be enclosed by construction. Thus it seems acceptable to me to install the listed stovepipe and enclose it inside a decorative copper tube. For good measure, you should probably have some provision for venting the resulting annular ...


4

You may not be able to find a timer that's designed to directly switch that much, but you can find a timer that switches a lot less, and use it to switch the coil of a relay that can switch whatever load you require. Relay coils take very little power to switch, and relay contacts can be had as large as you could possible need, or larger. However, if you ...


4

The stove will have a gas regulator on it, so assuming that it is performing as-expected, you cannot increase the pressure in order to generate more heat. The stove is designed to accept a range of pressures from the supply line to begin with and increasing the pressure beyond what the regulator is designed for would be dangerous. If the flame is mostly ...


4

Bottom line is NO, you definitely cannot do what you propose. You CANNOT parallel a circuit like this of this size. It is expressly forbidden in the NEC, and could very well be a safety hazard. If the appliance takes two separate circuits like your old one that is a different story. Do you know what size and type of wire is feeding the old 30A circuits? ...


4

You need to read through your owners manual. Set up procedures should tell you everything you need to know.


4

The water apparently got inside the stove and caused a short. If there was a fuse inside there that blew, the breaker wouldn't have tripped. The breaker is detecting the excessive current to the appliance and switching off the power before the wiring inside the wall overheats and start a fire. The best solution, as the electrician indicated, is to have the ...


4

It doesn't look like asbestos; it also does not seem likely that a stove manufactured that recently would incorporate asbestos in a "user serviceable" area. Problem is that some countries still do not regulate asbestos. The only way to know for sure is to ask the maker or have it analyzed at a lab. It does look like it could be refractory ceramic fiber (RCF)...


4

As long as the oven only needs the output from 3/8" then there is no issue with this at all. I would think that that 3/8" could supply any home oven (that's still a lot of gas) so I don't think there is an issue at all. If the manufacturer agrees then there is no reason for you to worry about it. Frankly the installer probably installed the shut-off that ...


4

The stove may be one of the more modern types known as having "dual fuel". I have one of those and the cook top burners above are using natural gas while the oven operates on electricity. In fact even the oven has two operating modes selectable between static heat generation and convection with the hot air being moved around. As such the stove unit has a ...


4

Pull the oven burner and check for lint or any thing that could partially block the air inlet at the burner venturi. If you can see the flame, It should be blue and have a definite pattern not yellow and lazy. My last home had propane for cooking and the stove required more than normal maintenance. If the odor is a "burn your nose or eyes" kind of odor that ...


4

10/3 cable absolutely requires a 30A breaker or less. Period. NEC 240.4(B), which overrides any number anywhere else in Code (though all those other places also limit NM/UF/Romex to 30A). You will need to review your range's UL-approved instructions to see whether it "recommends" or "requires" 8/3 and a 40A breaker. If it "requires", then pull 8/3 (leave ...


4

The burners on stoves are either on or off, there's no "variable" resistance in them. The "variable" part comes from the switch that has a bi-metal switch that varies the amount of time the burner is on. At low temperatures the switch opens fast so the burner doesn't get too hot. When you set the switch for high temperatures, the bi-metal ...


3

Before you do anything else, look at the appliance's rating plate. It is probably located somewhere inside the door or maybe on the back. While this one is for an electric clothes dryer, all appliance ratings plates have the same information. You can see it clearly indicates the amperes required, in this case 24. So a 30 amp circuit would be fine. If ...


3

The basic chemistry of efficient natural gas burning is about a 10:1 air to fuel ratio. The air at high altitudes has less oxygen per volume (the air is less dense) There are a number of ways to compensate. Derate the burner by decreasing the fuel orifice size. This returns the burner to the correct air-fuel ratio, but produces less heat. This method ...


3

For an accummulation of gas, you would smell rotten eggs. I suspect something spilled on the floor under the appliance, or something plastic fell back behind it.


3

I don't think there is enough information provided in your question to absolutely answer this, as well, we try and stay away from location-specific codes on this site. As Tester101 mentioned, whether you can re-use the existing vent will depend on the distance as well as the size of the vent and the number of bends. The capacity of the hood will also play ...


3

In case the range is not square? Huh? Don't hire the person that said this! Ranges come in standard sizes, and as you see, your 30" range is NOT 30". The standard is to set the space between the base cabinets is 30"


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