Hot answers tagged

14

I would say that this is highly dangerous. It is against US and Canadian code to not have outside ventilation for any fuel-burning appliance in your home; that's your furnace, HWH and stove/oven, assuming all are NG or propane. It is only acceptable to have a "filter-only" vent hood for your stove if it's all-electric (which BTW is the case for every single ...


12

There's two issues here. The first is the CO alarm. SOMETHING is wrong. It may be the stove, or some other combustion device in your house, but it's definitely something to pay attention to. I'd suggest getting a second CO detector and place it around the house and monitor the levels carefully. If it's the stove, it's less of a ventilation issue and more of ...


11

Many years ago, electrical was done without ground wires. Range/ovens need 240V for all the stuff that makes heat, and 120V for the oven light (so you can use readily available bulbs). Because of this, ranges were supplied 120/240V hot-hot-neutral. When the grounding "fad" took off, the NFPA wanted to mandate 4-wire range and dryer connections: hot-...


10

It makes complete sense to replace your water heater early, because the failure mode for most of the older ones is "break and drain all over the inside of your house" -- and the 'drip pan' can only catch so much. You don't say where you're from, so I can't give you any climate or region-specific suggestions on what to replace and what not to replace. I ...


10

What is happening is called product of combustion. Somewhere around in the house or near the house someone used or opened some sort of stain, paint, varnish or comparable compound including cleaners. The molecules carry over and get mixed in with air and then burned off from open flame. If you light a candle or a lighter you will smell the same odor, ...


9

A nearly 40 year old power cord is going to be nasty. Dust, grease, possibly cracked insulation internally, possibly asbestos insulation if the "original" cord was itself recycled. All are fine unless you disturb the cord. Pulling the stove out disturbs the cord. Pulling out a stove is a fairly major operation, I would take the opportunity to completely ...


7

In most cases when you purchase a free-standing electric range, you'll be required to purchase the appliance cord separately. The sales person should ask if you need a 3 or 4 prong cord, at the time of purchase. NEC Article 250.140 Frames of Ranges and Clothes Dryers. requires 4 prong receptacles and appliance cords to be used in new installations, but ...


7

Have a look at the 2006 International Residential Code. Here are a few sections that may apply. Chapter 15 - Exhaust Systems SECTION M1501 GENERAL M1501.1 Outdoor discharge. The air removed by every mechanical exhaust system shall be discharged to the outdoors. Air shall not be exhausted into an attic, soffit, ridge vent or crawl space....


7

Do you have the manual for the thing? I've done a little poking around (I even found a bunch of parts diagrams at Sears website), and I'm getting the impression that it's got a spark ignition system, not a pilot. Is the range plugged in? Is there any chance that the circuit it's on has tripped it's breaker? I've got a cooktop with a spark ignition system, ...


7

It is called a spade connector, or spade lug terminal. You are holding a female connector. You can purchase these at an electronics supply shop. As you might expect, they are available in a bewildering variety of styles and sizes. You might want to bring one of your connectors for identification. Some are designed to be soldered onto the end of a wire, ...


6

Get the 220v outlet while you can. With that wiring, you can run two 110v circuits in the future or install an electric oven if you change your mind. Running another line in the future would be much more difficult, so now is the time to have it installed. The only change you'll likely have to make is replacing the double breaker with two single breakers if ...


6

To increase the amp rating of your circuit breaker, you almost certainly need to increase the gauge of all the wiring on that circuit. Circuit breakers are there to protect the wiring for overloading, overheating, melting the insulation, and eventually starting a fire. Typically, you have the following wire gauges (this may vary with long circuits and your ...


5

Why did they turn off the gas? To do some work? If that is the case then there is probably air in the line. The pilot orifice is small compared to the burners which means it will take longer for the air to "bleed out". Alternatively, there may be a button somewhere that you have to hold down (to get the gas flowing to the pilots) in order to light the ...


5

There are no definite answers here. Lifespan of your appliances depends on how often you use them, how well you take care of them, quality of the appliance in question (bargain basement vs premium brand), and dumb luck. You can replace your water heater now as a preventative measure, and you'll be kicking yourself when your fridge dies tomorrow. However, ...


5

If your refrigerator really is 20 years old, you should investigate whether it makes sense to buy a new, more energy efficient one. The electric utility may provide a rebate in addition to what you will save on electricity. Most of the appliances you mention should last a very long time with little maintenance. For the dryer you should keep the lint trap ...


5

There should be a vent cover on the outside of the house, at the end of the exhaust with a damper or louvers. Something like this The damper or louvers will be shut when the hood fan is off, preventing air from coming in or going out. If you don't have a vent cover like this, you should install one. If you already have one, you'll want to inspect it to ...


5

See table 220.55 in the NEC, as well as footnote 4 to that table: Branch-Circuit Load. It shall be permissible to calculate the branch-circuit load for one range in accordance with Table 220.55. The branch- circuit load for one wall-mounted oven or one counter-mounted cooking unit shall be the nameplate rating of the appliance. The branch-circuit ...


5

That is probably normal (with a small possibility of being a defect). The hot indicator is precisely that, and is designed to turn off only after all spots have definitely cooled. And it may not know when that is, because it may be a simple timer, rather than a temperature sensor. And it may be designed for worst case, i.e. A pot left on the burner for ...


4

Any house can be equipted to run a gas stove. Some houses have gas service from the utility, others have on-site tanks. If you already have gas service or some type of gas distribution in your house, then you can add a stove by having a licensed contractor run a line to your kitchen. The process is similar to running new pipes or electrical circuits. ...


4

Assuming it's anything like the US, you'll have a dedicated breaker for the stove in your electrical panel. Shut it off first (really, it would be a good idea to do that before moving the stove for the renovation). With the power turned off, you can remove the wall plate (I don't see screws in your picture, so you may just have to pry it off) and/or remove ...


4

Putting the stove in the corner like you propose also gives you some nice space to work with for routing the pipe up into the ceiling / roof area or out an exerior wall. Seems to me that re-routing the vent to the previous riser location is a total non-starter. Many hoods vent up into the small cabinet above the hood and your re-routed vent pipe is going ...


4

I will assume this wood stove has a proper air jacket from which heated air can be drawn? The possibility of dangerous gases infiltrating into this jacket is a valid concern and entirely dependent on the integrity of the firebox. This can only be done by careful inspection and possibly some sort of pressure test. In theory, this can be just as safe as any ...


4

You need to use a listed insulating stovepipe anytime combustible construction is penetrated. These pipes are also listed to be enclosed by construction. Thus it seems acceptable to me to install the listed stovepipe and enclose it inside a decorative copper tube. For good measure, you should probably have some provision for venting the resulting annular ...


4

The stove will have a gas regulator on it, so assuming that it is performing as-expected, you cannot increase the pressure in order to generate more heat. The stove is designed to accept a range of pressures from the supply line to begin with and increasing the pressure beyond what the regulator is designed for would be dangerous. If the flame is mostly ...


4

Bottom line is NO, you definitely cannot do what you propose. You CANNOT parallel a circuit like this of this size. It is expressly forbidden in the NEC, and could very well be a safety hazard. If the appliance takes two separate circuits like your old one that is a different story. Do you know what size and type of wire is feeding the old 30A circuits? ...


4

You need to read through your owners manual. Set up procedures should tell you everything you need to know.


4

The water apparently got inside the stove and caused a short. If there was a fuse inside there that blew, the breaker wouldn't have tripped. The breaker is detecting the excessive current to the appliance and switching off the power before the wiring inside the wall overheats and start a fire. The best solution, as the electrician indicated, is to have the ...


4

It doesn't look like asbestos; it also does not seem likely that a stove manufactured that recently would incorporate asbestos in a "user serviceable" area. Problem is that some countries still do not regulate asbestos. The only way to know for sure is to ask the maker or have it analyzed at a lab. It does look like it could be refractory ceramic fiber (RCF)...


4

As long as the oven only needs the output from 3/8" then there is no issue with this at all. I would think that that 3/8" could supply any home oven (that's still a lot of gas) so I don't think there is an issue at all. If the manufacturer agrees then there is no reason for you to worry about it. Frankly the installer probably installed the shut-off that ...


4

The stove may be one of the more modern types known as having "dual fuel". I have one of those and the cook top burners above are using natural gas while the oven operates on electricity. In fact even the oven has two operating modes selectable between static heat generation and convection with the hot air being moved around. As such the stove unit has a ...


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