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24

I hate to tell you this, but your barn is toast. Have it demolished before it kills some curious soul who wanders inside out of morbid fascination.


19

I would only drill that stone as an absolute last resort. That not only damages it in an unrecoverable way but opens it up to faster degradation from weather, especially if you're in a frost zone. Get some aluminum wire for bonsai (example). It's anodized in a suitable color and very easy to work with. You could also use coated steel gardening wire (per ...


18

For the love of God, don't do anything from inside, to avoid collapsing on you. I would get a 2x6 for the top bracing and a couple of 2x4's for the bracing. Nail the bracing to the top bracing, away from the structure. Use at least a 20-30 degree angle (eye it if needed) Use 2 people and push it into place without getting close. Once in position, drive some ...


8

I am a granite top fabricator, and every time I drill a hole in granite or marble, it always scares me. I think, "what if I crack this top by making the slightest error; I better pay attention and take my time!" Because the slightest error can break your stone top; even with experience it is nerve racking. First you need a hole saw guide. Cut a guide hole ...


5

I would handle this as a tile countertop. Instead of small 4x4 tiles you will be working with the larger slate sheets. This means, 3/4 plywood down as a base. Cement board on top of that and then thin set to attach the tiles. You can then trim the outsides in whatever you want. It can be wood, tile or metal. You can also use the slate cut into smaller ...


5

The characteristics and composition of firebrick also called refractory brick make it suitable for high heat applications. Conventional pavers will fail quickly when exposed to heat. I can't testify about pavers but I have had concrete explosively spall (small pieces of concrete shrapnel) while cutting steel anchors with a torch. So you really need bricks ...


5

You can absolutely do this yourself with a powerdrill and 21 dollar diamond hole saw from HD. For a standard faucet hole, you need a 1 3/8" diamond hole saw. I ended up not only drilling the faucet hole, but laminated the edge to double the thickness, polished with a diamond pad, and installed an undermount sink. There is no doubt that this is a risky DIY ...


5

That looks just plain done wrong to me. The drain entrance should be below the membrane that should be below the stone. Cracks in the grout should have no impact on the waterproofing effectiveness. Drain entrance level with stone surface = designed to fail. A minimally invasive fix would be to lay a membrane on the top of the current stone and lay new stone ...


4

Alignment, temperature, speed. All critical in cutting stone. A drill press or alignment jig would be better than just a handheld drill (and definitely not a hammer drill) and a constant water stream and slow speeds are necessary. At some point you are spending on tools close to what the stoneman wants. DIY is possible, but this is the kind of job I would ...


4

Listen, I just did this. It is extremely simple. Buy a 4 inch diamond tip bit for your angle grinder. (Masonry cutting wheel). Score a 1/4 inch line on the inside of the block and then tap (yes TAP) the outside in with a hammer or dead blow hammer.... This is super easy. I did blocks in roughly 45 minutes. Regards, J


4

To mount this mantle you will need to drill into the stone face! The outline of the mantles' position should be taped to keep track of its placement. You will need to scribe the profile of the stone to the wood mantle. More on this if needed. As long as the scribe marks are back cut severely, in essence, hollowing out (making it concave) the back edge ...


4

I've installed that tile. It's not to hard to cut--even by hand as you can just cut through the mesh backing. Even easier with a tile saw. So I'd suggest not tiling more than you have to and live with the cutting. So I'd install the vanity first, then tile around it. That said, note that that tile a) can't be grouted and b) is very uneven and c) porous ...


4

Probably not a good idea. As you said, the stones are heavy. If you could guarantee a solid rest on the floor, maybe, but I'd simply cut out the drywall a few inches inside your stone area, replace it with 1/2" cementboard, and call it good. This would be simpler than the wire lath business. I'd float backing at the joint of the cementboard and drywall to ...


4

The wall may have been built that way but I doubt it, the wall may have shifted over the years and is stable now. The only way to know is to drop a plumb bob from the upper decking just in front of the wall and measure the gap at top middle and bottom. Mark the spot or leave a nail or screw in that location and Mark the wall at the 3 points so you can ...


4

The manufacturer of the fireplace is okay with it, so you definitely can. I have done it many times and I found it the best option is to use cement board and then the appropriate application method for the finishing material. I've always used high temperature morter of various kinds and never had an issue. The key to remember is, accessibility to service the ...


4

There are many plastic concrete anchors you can use for this. The one I like best it the one pictured below. They come in a variety of sizes and will match the screw hooks you'd like to use. Your hooks are stainless steel so they'll last a long time and so will the anchors. You'd need a masonry drill bit to drill the hole but many packages of these anchors ...


4

Personally I wouldn't drill it. I'd get some adhesive hooks, then throw away the adhesive part and use construction adhesive instead. That should be plenty strong to hold some outdoor string lights.


4

Normally the stone is applied directly to the backer board once the pieces are set a grout is used between the stones (today I would recommend epoxy grout). After grout a sealer can be used , I have done a couple jobs like this and do not recommend for a shower area. Even if well sealed natural stone picks up the soap scum and can be a pita to clean. I did a ...


4

"Look nice" is a highly subjective criterion. One approach to that sort of junction is to scribe a trim board. One tacks a trim board in a vertical position touching the stone, and then sets a compass or pair of dividers equal to the largest gap between the stone and the board. The compass or dividers are then used to follow the irregular stone ...


3

My house was built in the 1880s and has a stone foundation, mostly sand stone. The best fix for situations like this I have found is building a form and packing in stiff cement and as large of pieces of the original rock as I can get. If you do the form in a couple layers (say using a 2x4 or 2x6, the long way). Let the cement s set around 24 hours and brush ...


3

Where is the water damage relative to the exterior ground level? I note in the outside picture that there is significant slope to the ground - if the ground on the uphill and slope-side sides is not shaped to move water away from and around the house, it would be likely that there would be water damage on the lower parts of the walls from water flowing over ...


3

When something calls for x" of compacted y, you typically calculate the amount of y prior to compacting. So if something calls for a 4" compacted base, order enough to cover your area with 4". Then compact. (Actually, order to cover 4", but the only lay down half, compact that, then lay down the other half, then compact that.) In other words, you don't ...


3

Having DIY'd a granite tile (24"x24") benchtop with undermount sink I'd say it's not that hard if you're careful and patient. As the comments above say you absolutely must use an alignment jig or similar. I had the freedom to use a drill press and I put masking tape on the stone to give a safe surface to get the last 1mm of alignment. You probably need to ...


3

If you are using real Stone, one thing to consider, the wall doesn't support the weight , it just hold it from moving horizontally, any real Stone need a firm base to sit on like a heart or Concrete slab like your floor . This is called vertical load. The only attachment you need on the wall is a wall tie and a 8 penny nail. There should always be a hollow ...


3

Diamond hole saws work well for this with water. If this is anything like the stone foundations I have worked with there will never be a straight mortar line that could be used. On one of the first walls I drilled through I used a hammer drill and bit , The hammer drill caused the rock to break out on the back side and it was very tough to repair. This is ...


3

One approach is to pry up one of the tottering edges up slightly and inject exterior construction adhesive (some are rated for stone/masonry) a few inches in and staying well away from the outside edges. Then lower the stone and let it dry undisturbed. When dry, this creates an adhesive wedge. Its sticking power is less important than its shape. Obviously, ...


3

All cement products contain silicates, from the sand use in the cement. It won't be breathable unless you create dust by cutting or breaking the panels. That being said, I don't see instructions for using Kerdi Board for flooring in the Schluter product data. It could be there and I just missed it, but I'm not seeing it. Schluter is actually pretty good ...


3

That is a pretty big piece of rock. It would probably be better to distribute the load by using brackets. In the photo above, the mantle is wood, but the principle for stone is the same. What you want to do is build the brackets into the chimney as deeply as possible. So, you actually remove entire bricks and insert the brackets deep into the chimney ...


3

I'd install some wooden trim / decorative moulding and paint it to match nearby woodwork. Make the left vertical edge of the decorative-stone even by cutting where needed (e.g. middle row of upper photo). tack/glue appropriate sized stripwood behind front edge of moulding as shim. Attach the shimmed moulding using adhesive (as presumably used for the ...


3

Rock instead of plants or mulch keeps the foundation dry (or better so than plants or mulch than soak up the water and retain it) Prevents grass and weeds from growing by a wall, if used with a barrier underneath, to make it easier for trimming without hitting the wall. Prevents splashing up of dirt or mulch onto walls. I have a garden out by a shed that ...


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