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3

That appears to be a garbage disposal chrome trim ring. Get another one and replace this one. It's permanently damaged and corroding. Most of these are chrome-plated brass. Once the chrome flakes off there is nothing to stop the brass from damage. I'm not seeing any stainless steel in your photo.


5

Unfortunately that looks like they used an acid that stripped the chrome finish off. No good way to get that back on.


1

You're oversimplifying. Compression strength isn't the only critical factor. It also has to have the required stiffness. Otherwise, someone bumps a hip into it and the thing buckles. And it has to have a load test rating for safety and legal liability. Your insurance company will chuckle if you squash someone and then file a claim. Use a rated beam column. ...


1

Another option is powder coating. This is a process in which an even coating of powder is electrostatically applied to a metal part, then baked in an oven to cure it. It's usually a hard wearing coating, and comes in a variety of finishes. There are translucent powder coatings available, including in smoke grey gloss, that would give you the darkening ...


4

(Note: original question asked about using wood stain on stainless steel.)I doubt a wood stain would adhere to metal of any sort whatsoever, unless the metal was very rough and the stain settled into some of the depressions leaving some behind when the solvent evaporated. Even if it did, the color would be very succeptable to being scratched off because it ...


0

If these strips are removable, you could consider using a hydro-dip process to create almost any surface coloration, as well as a substantial number of patterns. "Hydro dipping" is the process of applying a specially-prepared film to a surface. Above image taken from linked site. This is on the linked page as "metal" film for which there ...


0

The base plate appears to be grouted in, this is fine this will keep out water and oxygen from underneath, Don't worry about this. Your aim is keep it sealed. It shouldn't corrode. The welds themselves are fine, corrosion appears mild and surface only. The bulges on the steel are from impact damage, as most have pointed out If you want to improve this, find ...


1

Totally cosmetic, has not, will not weaken because of future rust. The only corrosion in the home is caused by water when mopping the floor and splashing the bare steel. The uniform grey color of the steel beam indicates it has a zinc rich primer. Mill scale would be nearly black and not as uniform in color. When the weld was made it burned off the zinc ...


3

I'm too am a welder. User142029 is absolutely correct.Those joints are fine. It's rusting faster because it's not the same metal as the base material. The structural integrity is fine. I would clean it as best as i could with a wire wheel / cup and cold galvy spray it. Not much you can do about the underside without removal.


2

They should have re painted the beam or any parts where they removed galvanized painting along with the welds on the beam. All steel beams come galvanized painted to prevent rust from forming... To solve this problem I would recommend doing a good cleaning to remove all the rust and oxidation to the best of your ability, then go to your local home ...


0

The rust that is on the photo looks mild and repairable. The worse problem is the possibility of rust forming on the underside of the base plate. You can't repair the underside without removing the beam. You don't even know how much rust is in there (and how much metal is left). On the other hand, you may want to find the source of the moisture that enables ...


2

There is significant corrosion present in the welds and the beam itself. Without further examination, it is impossible to determine the extent of the damage to the metals and the structural engineering impact. A competent (and licensed) engineer intimate with the properties of metal will need to evaluate this. Commercial engineering x-ray machines are ...


2

It is interesting to see that your weld joints have become rusty and seem deteriorated. Also, it is notable that both flanges have deformed (bulging) locally, the deformation could be caused by the rust pack (layers of rust steel), or worse, caused by over-stress. I think it needs more than just cleaning and repainting, which would not stop the process of ...


5

This looks like surface rust so you'll want to remove it. There are many rust removal products like Naval Jelly,etc. but I've found White vinegar to be just as good. Saturate the area with the vinegar and let it sit for 30 minutes and wipe off. A second or third coat may be necessary. Afterwards, prime the area and paint with a quality paint for steel. The ...


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