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50

Lay the steel plate on the concrete where you want it. Draw a line around it. Cut a piece of paper to the same size as the steel plate. Place it on the concrete in the same position as the marked outline. Locate the concrete holes by gently pressing down where you think they are (tracing paper makes this even easier). Poke a hole through the paper at ...


28

3/8" mild (hot-rolled) steel isn't difficult to drill, but any bit will fail if you get it hot enough to melt the cutting edge. Each hole should take no more than a minute. Use a sequence of sizes (1/8", 1/4", 3/8"). This makes for quicker drilling and allows each bit to cool between uses. If you only have "pilot point" bits on hand, use a starter bit that'...


27

Drill a round hole, and then square the sides with a file. You might also get lucky by calling metal working shops in the area. If they have a punch of the right size, it would take only seconds for them to punch the hole for you. A maker space might have the tools to help you here. Possibly a laser cutter.


17

A If you choose B you will dimple the steel, ruining the look while creating a penetration point for water because expansion and contraction of the metal due to heating and cooling will create an open access point for water to enter, and a big opening behind it to receive it. A, however, will give you a tight seal against the wood, wood-steel-screw in a ...


16

Depending on how small a square you want to cut out, you may be able to do it with a rotary tool (e.g.- a Dremmel) with a cut-off wheel.


16

Cutting should be easy This is true for generally all tool-bit-upon-steel work. You should cut long, continuous "chips" (strings, really) that come off like pasta, to the point where you sometimes have to intervene to break them, to keep them from rats-nesting around the drill. run quite cool, to where you can disengage the bit from the work and grab it ...


15

The usual methods are: Careful measurement. Really this doesn't need to be that precise, you are not looking for a press-fit between bolts and clearance holes. If it goes wrong, just elongate a hole into a slot using whatever tools you have to hand (e.g. a round file, clapped-out old Bridgeport, ...) - Remember: "A grinder file/filler and paint make me ...


15

If I have to drill square tubing with a hand operated electric drill I will use a square and mark a line all the way around the four sides of the tubing at the location along the length where the hole is to be located. Then mark the center locations of the holes on the two faces of the tubing on opposite sides. Then use a center punch to dimple the center ...


14

OK, a few definitions: Yield strength is the amount of force required to cause the steel to yield, which means permanently deform (i.e. permanently stretch). Tensile strength (a.k.a. "ultimate strength") is the amount of force required to cause the steel to actually break. This will be equal to or greater than the yield strength. Minimum just means that ...


13

Any information you'd glean from this discussion is untrustworthy for the following reasons: No photos. They often reveal issues not mentioned in your short description. No dimensions. In engineering, dimensions are key. No information about construction era or age. That would tell us a lot about common building techniques. No liability. Anyone telling ...


13

Your best bet would be the correctly sized metal screw. Not a bolt, but a screw. Some of them are self drilling/tapping (these are commonly referred to as simply "self-tapping" in the US). They will drill their own hole and tap their own threads all in one step. If you can't find the right sized metal screw, you can get a self-tapper a little bigger than ...


11

All steel has a Young's Modulus of 200 GPa (29 000 ksi) (This is the slope of the straight part of the graph) . Ultimate Strength runs from 300 - 400 MPa (peek of the graph), and the Yield is usually around 200 MPa (Where straight becomes curved). In a test machine, you can stretch and shrink a steel bar up and down that straight part of the graph forever ...


11

For the serious metalworker there are square punches, but for the hobbyist one great tool is the nibbler. This is a handheld punch that removes about 1/8 by 1/4 inch of material per stroke. With practice you can make almost any size and shape hole you want in sheet metal. I know Klein Tools makes one, as one I have one. Others probably do so as well.


11

That application obviously results in a lot of torsional stress on the part. You'll want to drill the top for bolts and nuts, as opposed to using sheet metal screws, which will eventually work loose. I'd size them to the holes in the bracket plate. The type of bolt isn't really important, but you probably want something with a low head profile. It must be ...


11

Feeds and speeds First, there is one correct feed and speed that will make even a $1 drill cut like through butter. This is an eye-opener for those new to metal work; they think they can buy effective cutting with expensive bits. Nope, it is not for sale. What you're thinking is a waterknife; you can definitely buy those! I work in metal a lot; and I don'...


10

1) Use an 81" length of metal with a 'T' cross section. Cut a slot down the middle of the 81" edge of the panel to accommodate it. Dry fit, then assemble with construction adhesive. If desired, 'pin' the T-bar in place with nails or screws through the surface of the door. ... or ... 2) Use an 81" length of metal with a 'U' cross section and 1.5" outside ...


9

Using a holesaw in steel that's more than about 1/16" thick can be frustrating. The bits wear out fast, and it really likes to bind. I've had better luck using a step drill bit, like this one from Harbor Freight.


9

A hack saw is a fine tool to cut fairly thin gauge tubing (which this seems to be). You may want to use a jig of some sort, such as a miterbox, to keep your cut square to the piece. Tape around the diameter to minimize chipping of the finish. File down the cut edge to remove the burrs from sawing, using a metal file, followed by emory paper. If there is a ...


8

Miter the ends of the tubing itself and then weld the corners.


8

Most drill bits sold are "high speed" drill bits intended for a variety of materials including metal (but not concrete, tile, glass or extended use in plaster or plasterboard). If the bits are fairly sharp, you should be able to use them in the steel, assuming it is not a hardened alloy. To improve your chances, a bit of oil or cutting fluid at the ...


8

In general, yes, stainless steel is more corrosion resistant than copper. It forms a tightly bonded oxide coating which tends to prevent further corrosion. If replumbing a house where copper pipes corroded (this is more prone to happen in some areas than others due to water chemistry differences) my first instinct at this point would be to use PEX plastic ...


8

No. Steel bits need to be very sharp to do their job. In fact, unless you set a depth gauge just barely through the metal, you'll wreck the cutting edge with every hole when you contact concrete and need to resharpen. Concrete bits create holes by pounding and disintegrating the material. They have cutting edges, but that's mostly to focus the impact and ...


7

Right snips are the most often used and it is possible to use only them, but if you want a neat and professional finish I would advise getting both right- and left-cutting, considering they are not that expensive for a decent set. If you are a beginner with corrugated it may be worth getting offset snips if you're planning on cutting the length of sheets. ...


6

I have been using metal studs in basement renovations for years. They stand up to corrosion and when you use spray foam insulation they are almost like rock (even before drywall). Many people have the misconception that metal studs are flimsy. Studs are available in a variety of different gauges and are "cold rolled" to maintain strength. These heavy gauge ...


6

One of the really great benefits of metal roofing is its ability to deflect heat which reduces cooling costs. This is because of its high reflective and emissivity (ability to release heat) qualities. Metal roofing is beneficial both in hot and cold weather. Its benefits are well documented.


6

You could build big concrete posts, maybe 12" in diameter, up about 12" above ground level, and use metal post bases to keep the wood off the concrete. Be sure to treat the end grain and base of the post with the best preservative you have available, and it ought to hold up pretty well. In the comments you mention you're in the mid Pacific. Without ...


6

One dirty hack is an old optical disk, a CDROM or a DVD or similar. Lay this on the stock, or tape it on if the stock is not flat. Make sure the silver reflective side is facing your drill. Put your drill through the hole in the middle, and its really easy to see when the drill is not square by the reflections. Check in two different directions separated ...


5

I would use some neoprene washers between the exterior bolt head and metal wall. Also put some silicon sealant in the hole/bolt. This will keep water out and stop bolt head from scratching the powder coating and causing rust. Should work fine.


5

Drilling steel is easy, once it is marked and punched. I would use a 4 or 5mm high speed steel bit. It needs to be sharp, and sharpening it is a trick: you would need to be shown, as I can't easily describe the technique in words. Drill on faster speed pushing fairly hard, with some sort of oil (CT-90), by piloting you remove the very centre, which in ...


5

It will probably be 3 to 6 hours of non-skilled labor (neighborhood kids?) to dig up the concrete and remove the whole assembly. Don't cut the post off: it will help wiggle out the base. Dig a hole immediately to one side of the concrete base of a convenient size. (There is no need to dig all around it.) A post hole digger works great. Make the hole at ...


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