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15

The US has a mixture of systems. I'm not sure what the prevalence is, but I've lived in homes with both steam and hot water heating. Steam offers the following advantages: One-pipe systems More heat transfer for a given radiator surface No distribution pumps Steam offers the following drawbacks: Furnace needs to be a low point Corrosion Finicky ...


10

This is basically going to be landlord work unless you plan playing heating technician and checking the basement pipes. Here's the gist: Air vents on the radiator must flow air out so it can be replaced by steam to heat. They sometimes have adjustment valves on them so you can balance the system. Air vents that are producing a lot of noise are either too ...


4

To echo what @acrosman said, yes insulate the pipes. I'd suggest using fiberglass pipe insulation joined with foil tape, and loose fiberglass / PVC caps for turns. Wear a respirator. Cuts can be made with a sharp, long utility knife. here's an example:


3

As stated in comment, it's really very unlikely that the steam supply is high pressure steam (per the standard nomenclature of the industry) for a multitude of reasons - too hot, requiring a dedicated, licensed boiler operator, and the commissioning and annual inspections would have failed the copper pipes before it was ever fired up. Also, someone would ...


3

Assuming that your boiler and mine are similar, you have two vents or pipes and the main exhaust. Main exhaust will emit carbon dioxide and water vapour, the products of combustion. A modern boiler exhausts gas at a lower temperature than earlier ones, having given some heat to the incoming air, so it is possible to see the water vapour condense to form a ...


3

The vents on a steam system, by releasing the air, allow the steam to rise. Often, the risers far away from the boiler will have their own vent to get the heat there quicker. If you capped it it would probably take longer for that part of the house to get warm. From an efficiency point of view you want that air purged ASAP. You can balance a system with ...


3

Don't change them. Single line steam radiators are tricky at the best of times, and most modern plumbers have little experience with them. In addition base board radiators make it impossible to put bookcases in. (In our climate they use up all of the external wall.) There are lots of ways to dress them up Recessing them is a bad idea, as the space to ...


3

Dry steamers are the preferred model as they reach upwards of 240 degrees Fahrenheit and leave less moisture after treatment. Wet steamers, still effective on bed bugs, don’t reach such high temperatures and can leave surfaces wet; the higher the temperature, the more effective in tight spots. http://www.badbedbugs.com/bed-bug-steamer/ So they aren't dry, ...


3

As pointed out by others, luminaires above or near a tub/shower must be "steam-proof" (rated for damp locations). This means the fixture will be sealed in some way, to prevent moisture from entering the housing and causing damage and/or an unsafe environment. NEC 2008 410.10 Luminaires in Specific Locations. (D) Bathtub and Shower Areas. No parts of ...


3

Do you know the temperature of steam pipes? Do you know the ignition point of wood? Some say the "ignition" point of wood is 451 deg F. Most say around 570 deg F. Either way, the surface temperature of steam pipes will NEVER even get close to that. Typically upwards of 250 deg F. I think you can trust your plumber on this one.


3

Dangerous? If it malfunctions and an over-pressure event occurs, that's dangerous. Whether or not a functioning gauge will provide early warning or not would depend on the experience/knowledge level of the gauge reader and the nature of the malfunction. Are you required to have a functioning pressure gauge? Most likely you are but it may depend on the duty ...


3

NOT an electric heater - a hot-water heater with an electric fan, connected to a central source of hot water (which might be under control of a thermostat not local to the Fan Coil Unit.) It is not inherently hazardous to leave such a unit turned on 24 hours a day. Would be a fairly simple/inexpensive "robotics" project to have a temperature sensor and a ...


3

They make external thermostats for that very unit. Tell the super you'd like one, ask them how much they'd want to install it, and if you can do a deal, you can do a deal. But you understand how that unit works? It does not make heat nor cold. Service water, supplied by the building's plant/ boiler works, arrives at your heater at 45-140F (depending ...


3

The item on the left is the steam trap and can not be regulated or shut off. stay away from this item. The shut-off valve is the item with the screw on the top. Turn the nut ccw (counter clockwise), just slightly about a 1/4 turn, then put a wrench on the stem above the nut, I would use a 6" or 8" pipe wrench or vise grips, and try to turn cw (clockwise) ...


2

I'd re-scrape, then smear a layer of white/clear caulk of the tub/tile/sink variety, working it into the 'wood' as much as possible.


2

If this is the only area that's being damaged then you could try screwing some stainless steel sheeting beneath it to act as a heat and steam shield from the dishwasher. You'll need to make sure that the very edge of the steel is not exposed so make sure it doesn't protrude out. And you may need to put some epoxy or similar right to the edge to stop the ...


2

The particular model in the diagram should have the orifice hand tight. If the orifice is left loose it can vibrate loose and fall off. There are other models and other brands that are adjustable. By turning the cap you expose more or less of the orifice. The larger the orifice the faster the air is expelled. This allows the steam to enter the radiator at a ...


2

I used a reciprocating saw with a metal blade to cut though my cast iron pipe. It's $60 if you don't already have one, but they come in handy. You could also use a angle grinder with a metal blade, but that's louder, sparkier and smells more.


2

The container doesn't have to be a PVC pipe. Wood boxes were the traditional solution, and still seem to be more common among woodworkers than the PVC approach. There are steam generators available from woodworking stores which are a bit more effective than an electric kettle. They may or may not be significantly more energy-efficient; boiling water takes ...


2

You appear to have (based on your other questions) a high efficiency gas boiler which is venting combustion products at relatively low temperature via PVC pipe. Combustion products are carbon dioxide and water vapor (and carbon monoxide if combustion is incomplete) - thus "steam" (condensate) will be present in the exhaust.


2

Maximum temperature of a household steam system is all of 250F, so not even paper will ignite from contact with steam pipes in a house (15PSI) boiler system. High pressure steam is not found in houses (in modern times - early systems were very dangerous) unless they are in major violation of a lot of codes and safety standards that would be of far more ...


2

You have two valves you can access here: The round knob on the bottom controls the flow of steam/water in/out of your radiator. This should typically remain fully open unless you are servicing the radiator. The white, numbered knob attached to the air release valve is a thermostatic valve that allows you some control over how much heat this radiator ...


2

It is a Ceramic Insulator for heat protection - the wires go to the heating element. EDIT 5-8-2017 As per Ed Beals comment (Thanks for the FYI) - I will make some explanation here . Heating elements are exactly that they heat up as the electricity flows through them, they have different ratings of wattage consequently also heat output, How hot they get. ...


2

Either system is quiet if installed and maintained correctly. Steam heat could become more noisy if the system is not maintained properly. There were 2 distinct steam systems employed for heating using either the older 1 pipe system or the slightly newer 2 pipe steam system. Of the 2sysyems the 1 pipe system always made more noise than the 2 pipe system. A ...


1

if anyone is still running across this question. the two pipes are intake and exhaust. typically installers will angle the intake downward. the primary byproducts of burning natural gas are Carbon Dioxide and water vapor, not carbon monoxide. if your boiler is utilizing an outdoor reset it will vary the water temperature according to the outdoor ...


1

In general terms no. The standard steam pipe insulation used today is shaped fiberglass tubes. I would have suggested installing conventional fiberglass pipe insulation on the pipes prior to insulating the walls. I feel that trying to get batt insulation around the pipes could leave voids.


1

Nope. The seals in the window have failed, allowing moist air between the panes. This window has lost a lot of its insulating properties and the glazing needs to be replaced. Talk to the owner.


1

In the plumbing world this is fine. However it might not be fine with your dryer. You will need to read the manual or call the manufacturer to get an answer. I don't foresee a dryer using a steaming feature needing more than a 1/8" line but who knows if there is some sort of pressure rating needed. It is probable that the manufacturer doesn't use 1/8" ...


1

There is only one right answer: build a chimney and vent it above the roof. If the aesthetics don't bother you, just extend the vent duct right to or above the roof line. If you don't extend it beyond the roof line, you will continue to get the issues with the ice dams since the heated vapor will melt the snow above the exhaust point. My house is built in ...


1

The problem is most likely hot exhaust coming from the vent entering the attic and melting snow on the roof, creating an ice dam and snow melt. Since you have continuous soffit vents, blocking off any one section would not be the end of the world. You would want to block it with an air barrier material like plywood or foam insulation board, sealed at the ...


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