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If you've still got the leftover stain and varnish from the original finishing, you should be able to match it. I would sand off the varnish and stain and then use some adhesive remover to thoroughly get rid of any residue. Then apply the stain and varnish like you did when you originally did the job. Good luck.


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Of course you can do it, and you probably can even get the polyurethane to look pretty good. The trick might be how closely you can get the stain to match. If it's a very light stain or an extremely dark stain it will be more forgiving. If it's a tone somewhere in the middle, you will need to judge your skill level, and make sure the color is spot on before ...


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That handrail does not meet code, because it is not continuous from top to bottom of stairway and the ends do not terminate correctly at the bottom. The Code (ICC R311.7.7) requires handrails: 1) Height to be between 30” and 38” above the nosing of the tread, and 2) Be continuous on at least one side of a stairway with 4 or more risers and be from a ...


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I believe if tubing is used the end of the hand rail must be closed. We use square tubing quite a bit and close the ends at top and bottom I believe this is what the code is referring to.


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Check out Diamabrush (https://diamabrush.com/). I used one in an angle grinder to strip 7 layers of sander clogging paint from 700sqft of pine flooring. It worked great.


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You might want to try a scraper, which will do particularly well with corners. In the current era, a scraper with a reversible & replaceable tungsten carbide blade is probably your best bet unless you really enjoy sharpening/burnishing a steel scraper. A scraper can do the whole job, or assist with those parts of the job that other methods do not ...


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I've had great results using Citristrip, (see below). I've used it indoors many times and it leaves no fumes. I've used it to strip multiple layers of paint and varnish from furniture. There are many products to choose from but I know this one works. It just goes on with a brush. Good luck, you took on a big job redoing a staircase. This product looks ...


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On an aesthetic view, would leaving them look nice and authentic/rustic? YES Furniture finishers go to great lengths to achieve what is called a distressed look. They poke holes, lash with chains, beat upon with sticks, etc. to achieve a finish that you get for free! That being said, if your decor motif is ultra-clean/modern; a rustic distressed look may ...


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A good filler will work for the nail holes but probably won't help with the black spots because there's not enough depth for the filler to take hold. Be sure to get a filler that will take stain as many don't. These stairs were probably meant to be carpeted from the start so quality lumber wasn't used. Your best bet would be to buy/rent a belt sander and ...


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