New answers tagged

2

Is this a bad idea for any reason? With "mounting the LED strips in a 45-degree aluminum channel" and going up the stairs now has a bigger hook to catch shoes.


4

Make sure you dim the LEDs properly. Those lights must be good to add design and provide visibility to the stairs so people don't fall. They don't need to illuminate. Make sure that, with a proper dimmer, the lights are not bright enough to illuminate the space and blind the people. You may want to illuminate the space with something else than those LEDs


1

This arrangement produces less glare than you'd get from an exposed LED, but the top of the riser is still brighter than everything else. This doesn't seem ideal. What if you still pointed the LEDs down -- or, better yet, angled them so their beam pattern was more centered on the tread -- and then just used your angle strip to block direct glare anywhere ...


5

IMHO, you want to make sure the parts one treads on are best illuminated. Most importantly the front edge and not the riser. You can get there by adjusting your shade(s). LEDs are usually built so that they emit most intensity perpendicular to the mounting surface. I think it may be worth while experimenting with mounting the strip tilted towards the edge ...


4

It looks cool, but it's not very useful. The part of the stair you're lighting -- the risers -- are the one part that isn't important to someone using the stair. They need to see the treads (which will be quite dim), and in particular the nose (which will be the least lit of all). Essentially, you're asking them to "only step on the parts they can't see&...


11

It's a bit 'form over function'. It's the kind of lighting bars trying to look 'cool' use & which three drunks a night fall down, because they can't figure out where to step. Would it not be simpler [& probably far easier to see the stairs] to run the strip light [blue line] up the side of the staircase, angled down in a similar manner so it can't be ...


8

This is not an uncommon configuration. Case in point: there's a home renovation tv programme in The Netherlands, that is sponsored by a staircase renovation company. It has become a joke by now that each and every time, it just so happens that the staircase needs a renovation. The last couple of seasons has nothing but this design. So if professionals do it, ...


10

For someone who is partially sighted and doesn't have depth perception, it may easily look as though the lighted riser is the part you are supposed to step on. Do you remember those optical illusions and pictures where stairs will suddenly invert? I'm not saying not to do it at all, but please be careful in your implementation & try looking at it in low-...


35

I really like the way your mock-up looks! Additionally, as one whose eyes are extra sensitive to bright light, I would significantly prefer that to having any chance of light shining directly into my eyes. Even if the edge of this step isn't perfectly lit by the light above it, it's location would be intuitively obvious to all but the youngest child by the ...


11

I don't see any problem with mounting them in that way. Effectively you just use them as indirect lighting. They still provide some illumination to the steps themselves, just at lower intensity. Just make sure your aluminum bracket doesn't make electrical contact with the LED strip. (I would put a layer of water-proof insulation tape on the inside of the ...


4

Cover it up with a post It does not look good with all those edges showing but it does look solid. Leave it be. Get a post that same color wood and put it in the center. It will leave it solid and a center post might be good to grab anyway. Cut away the part of the post towards the stairs to fit those uneven pieces into the post. Someone there seems to ...


1

It's kinda hard to tell from just that picture since it's fairly zoomed in, but no, concrete/CMU steps, even if the cinder blocks appear to be attached, are totally fine to "crack" and pull away from the foundation wall, because they are in fact placed separately, typically after the ground level has been backfilled up against the house foundation ...


1

Building codes are for traditional staircases. I have had many many many flips (and wish I had pictures but didn't think about the future of answering questions on SE) and what I have done with stairs... when I can to save space and get around "code" is to use a spiral staircase. There are many sites that you can order from like this or you can ...


1

user3757614 has pointed to a source of the answer, which is https://codes.iccsafe.org/content/IRC2018/appendix-q-tiny-houses This specifies for 'tiny houses' (though this doesn't matter in my case as no building code is applicable, so whether my house is tiny or not is moot): risers must be between 7" (178mm) and 12" (305mm) Then either: tread ...


1

https://www.blog.stairwayshop.com/blog/compact-stairs-code-compliant https://blog.buildllc.com/2016/08/art-of-the-nonconforming-stairs/ These may be usable if: There is a second means of access to the space. This is an improvement over what you had before. (Which was presumably grandfathered in.) This is a replacement for a similar staircase. You don't plan ...


0

It is a bad idea to have those. There are building codes and OSHA requirements (in USA) for stair design. Sure, thousands sold on Ebay but there are also thousands of non approved electrical fixtures and switches sold there too. Insurance companies can deny claims if non compliant devices are found in the homes. If you knowingly install them you could be in ...


0

I’m an American, so I don’t know anything about metric. You’ll have to convert for me. (Also, I don’t know if our codes match your codes.) This information is for “living spaces”, so stairs to mechanical rooms, storage rooms, etc. would not require these standards. The maximum rise of steps is 8”. The maximum difference between risers is 3/8” from smallest ...


0

There is a simple reason you shouldn't use 5" x 2" tube as the stringer for stairs - it won't fit the stair thread that meeting code, or provide good connections for safety in service. See sketch and table blow. I suggest consulting with a structural engineer, who may suggest a deeper channel section that will provide the required strength and ...


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