5

Unfortunately that looks like they used an acid that stripped the chrome finish off. No good way to get that back on.


4

Welcome to DIY Home Improvement! 1/8" thick really isn't that bad. You could use a: Hack saw (cheapest method) Reciprocating saw Band saw


4

I'd have to guess it's the manufacturers' logo. In addition to the indicated grade marking, all grades, except A563 grades O, A and B, must be marked for manufacturer identification. –americanfastener.com


4

(Note: original question asked about using wood stain on stainless steel.)I doubt a wood stain would adhere to metal of any sort whatsoever, unless the metal was very rough and the stain settled into some of the depressions leaving some behind when the solvent evaporated. Even if it did, the color would be very succeptable to being scratched off because it ...


3

That appears to be a garbage disposal chrome trim ring. Get another one and replace this one. It's permanently damaged and corroding. Most of these are chrome-plated brass. Once the chrome flakes off there is nothing to stop the brass from damage. I'm not seeing any stainless steel in your photo.


3

The rust on the stainless eye came from the steel rope. The zinc galvanizing on the wire rope has corroded away leaving bare steel to rust. Using a stainless wire rope will greatly improve the corrosion resistance of the combination and you should have no problem. The eye is probably 316 SS ( 18 -8 + 2% Mo) as are many small consumer fasteners. In a mild ...


3

The screw eyes are not rusting. That's staining from the steel rope which i doubt is galvanized. The rust stains will come off with a little emery paper rub.


2

I can't tell from the picture, but ideally, if you can remove that piece and work on it freely, here's what you can do: Use a scotch brite pad and uniformly create scratches (the trick is to always always go in the same direction). This pad here is commonly used to mimic #4 finish in stainless steel. You can also go to heavier / coarser pads. If you ...


2

Galvanized will last forever in a desert and a few years " close to the ocean". Stainless usually means 304 or 316 ; 316 is better near the ocean . Very pricey but, monel would be the best ; available as boat hardware at a marine supply source.


2

The age-old question of whether or not to use alloy materials is subjective. cost vs. longevity consequence/cost of failure Rest assured that the galvanized components will fail. You will then be unable to adjust the tension of the cables. If the consequences of the failure outweigh the initial investment for alloy materials, you should buy stainless (this ...


2

Yes there are stainless fixtures but for the cost I would probably just purchase currently available led floods or wall packs. The fixtures I use are aluminum but are universal voltage rated 100-277vac. These low wattage high lumen output fixtures are so much less than a stainless fixture you could replace them 1/2 a dozen times and wire them directly into ...


2

For the screw that is stuck... The easiest way to deal with it is to chop it off and then to take a bigger bit and drill it down a good 1/8"+ so it doesn't ever stick out. Sure you can spend a ton of time backing it out but I wouldn't bother with it. I will give you two general pieces of advice when doing something like a deck... Test out your screws ...


2

My first deck, years and years ago, I used galvanized lag bolts and they corroded after about 7 years. My next one I used the best deck screws available, guaranteed for the life of the deck, etc. When I had to replace a plank after 4 years, the screws were rusted and snapped off when I tried to remove them. The corrosion in both cases really hastened the ...


1

The problem could as easily be debris (sand or similar sediments) instead of, or in combination with, a rust problem. Before doing anything else arrange for some upward force to lift the post. Continuous lifting, especially with more force than you can apply by hand, will ensure the post moves when it has the slightest opportunity to do so. Lash a tripod ...


1

Another option is powder coating. This is a process in which an even coating of powder is electrostatically applied to a metal part, then baked in an oven to cure it. It's usually a hard wearing coating, and comes in a variety of finishes. There are translucent powder coatings available, including in smoke grey gloss, that would give you the darkening ...


1

I’ve used epoxy that I’ve bought from my local plumbing store. Mix the two tubes and apply. It gets very hard. I’ve only used it on small drips and they haven’t leaked since. I’ve even seen it used on a 3 inch pex line once when they badly cut and it worked to stop the large leak.


1

A temporary fix could be achieved by using a gauze / cloth tape, plus something like Fernox LS-X. If you apply the Fernox to the joint, and then wrap it with the gauze, ensuring that the gauze is fully impregnated with the goo, you should get a good seal. Ensure you remove the pressure from the supply first. Fernox actually uses the water to cure, so it ...


1

According to the information I found online these are stove top pots. But the care instructions say: Wash by hand with warm water. Dry with towel. Do not reassemble until all parts are dry to avoid oxidation. Do not use soap or detergent. Do not use in dishwasher. Do not use steel wool or other abrasives. It sounds crazy but NO you ...


1

Indoors? No they won't corrode. Zinc looks different than stainless which is more dull, so just get the right screws. It looks bad, I've done it before on accident. Commercial door hardware companies will have boxes of them.


1

I would add a protective coating to it. I personally have used Stainless Steel Defender. I use this on anything from dishwashers, fridges, and bar-b-que pits when I flip a house. I have been happy with the product but there may be other products that are better - this is the only one I have used.


1

You can easily find galvanized fasteners that are rated for contact with all woods, including redwood, cedar, and pressure treated - see, for example, Simpson Strong Tie products. Stainless is generally more reliably corrosion resistant since it's not a coating, all of the material is corrosion resistant, and stainless steel is generally much stronger, ...


1

Primary reason for using stainless fasteners are: they are corrosion resistant the have good strength/structural integrity they are reasonably inexpensive Secondary reasons: they are aesthetically appealing compared to others they are ROHS compliant Anyway, the most important thing to note is that galvanized steel is significantly weaker than stainless ...


1

Good wire cutters. I have also used a chisel and anvil. Then you need the correct size of crimp or swage fitting. Depending on the size , there are also regular cable clamps. Carbon steel or stainless steel are similar high strength so that makes no difference to the cutting. I have assumed a small size like 1/8 in.


1

Well.. stainless steel pretty much welds just like regular steel (in so much as its a pretty simple welding procedure) Galvanised steel, (which is regular steel coated in a Zinc like covering) is the monster when you are welding. so, the answer is, that really its pretty easy to weld the two, you could use regular metal filler rods to weld the two, and it ...


1

I know it's an old post, but I just had this issue. This worked for me and maybe this will help someone. Cerama Bryte has a kit with a non scratching cleaning pad, razor and cleanser. I used the razor to carefully remove the big sections and then I used the pad and cleanser. I had to scrub for a bit but it really helped on my sink. After that there was a ...


1

Abrasion. Sandpaper, steel wool, non-woven abrasive pad (better known as the brand name Scotchbrite® in many places.) Also Bon-Ami cleanser, Lava soap, etc.


1

I did end up screwing it down. I used small, stainless, countersunk screws and took Ed Beal's suggestion of sealing it with red RTV. So far it's holding up just fine.


1

I think you are way over thinking this. Take your copper cable and crimp an appropriately sized copper ring terminal onto the end. Then drill and tap a threaded hole in the stainless steel bus bar that takes a screw of a size to fit nicely in the hole of the ring terminal. Simply screw the terminal to the bus bar and be done with the job. Obviously it is up ...


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