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11

Yes, that is perfectly fine and recommended. Instead of Phillips-head stainless steel screws, I would actually recommend Deckmate decking screws that have torx heads (six-pronged star) so the driver bit has more grip. I have very bad experience with stripping Phillips heads.


3

After some experimentation, I found that the underlying problem was from overtightening the bolts that connect the chair back to the seat assembly. Doing so puts excess pressure on the plastic shell and causes the creaking sounds. By loosening the bolts and refastening them without heavy torque, the problem is resolved and the chair reclines and moves ...


3

Squeaking usually comes from two places: Joists. Loose, overloaded, damaged, braced improperly, not even. Fix is usually lateral support using crosses. Plywood. Poor quality, warped/damaged, not thick enough, not glued down, not screwed properly or enough, pattern not well thought out (edges should be on joists or supports). Usually have to pull them ...


2

congratulations on your choice of machine - it was sold by sears, even if you did not buy it there, they have parts, unless you find them somewhere else on line. So, i visited http://www.searspartsdirect.com/GE-Washer-Parts/Model-WHDSR316G2WW/0432/0153200.html On to this page http://www.searspartsdirect.com/ge-washer-parts/model-WHDSR316G2WW/0432/0153200/...


2

Much of the difficulty in stopping floor squeaks comes from the fact that people don't want to remove or damage their flooring to fix it. There are special screws with heads that snap off and other gadgets to make it easy. You have no flooring, so it makes it a lot easier. Get some good, strong screws and go to town on the areas that squeak. Screw the ...


2

It may not be a matter of where, but of what. WD-40 isn't a great lubricant in some cases. It's very light and may not work on the nylon parts. It may also dissolve any actual grease that was present. Maybe try something with Teflon, lithium, or silicone, or use basic 3-in-1 household oil.


1

Sounds like there could be some self-leveling concrete somewhere under there. Self-leveling concrete is typically used to create a flat and smooth surface with a compressive strength similar to or higher than that of traditional concrete prior to installing interior floor coverings. Self-leveling concrete has increased in popularity as the degree of ...


1

A big part of the problem is that the old screws don't have a fully threaded shank. Over time, the screws will allow movement of the substrate. Especially if no adhesive was used between the substrate and the floor joists. A full-thread screw spreads the pressure over the entire length of the screw, with the greatest pressure being applied where it meets the ...


1

Two long for a comment, Fully agree with shims and glue. I wish they had Gorilla glue when I was building, that stuff works really well as it expands and then gets hard so for some areas that's all that may be needed. The wood needs to be dampened with water first for gorilla glue to work. I have used it on a 2 story home the owner did not want to open the ...


1

It's not a great picture, but it looks like the tub is supported by wood and foam. It's possible that the wood has rotted, or the structure that supports the wood has rotted or been compromised in some way. You can spray foam under there wildly, if you want. But if the structure that will support the foam (and tub) is compromised, it's not going to do you ...


1

You should determine where the squeak is originating before doing anything messy/drastic, since it might not fix the problem. I would guess that the squeak originates where the tubing touches the chipboard on the bottom of the tub. Would it be possible to unscrew (loosen) the tube from the chipboard and put cardboard on the top of the tube, then test for a ...


1

The suggestions from @sborsher, @Bryce, and @DMoore were fantastic, and gave me a lot to investigate (and budget) for. However, for my specific case, I had talked to over a dozen contractors. One - Sasha Grote - suggested a fantastically simple & effective solution that fit my budget, was minimally invasive, and even if it had failed, it would have ...


1

If all the fasteners in the frame are thoroughly tight, put a drop of 3-in-1 oil on the end of each spring where it goes through the eye and contacts metal (two on the upper end for each side) and see if that gets rid of most of it. Squeaking is caused by metal-on-metal contact where there's minute movement and no lubricant. Changing out the springs won't ...


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