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FIXED IT. I found a better solution: heat-shrink tubing. I couldn't get gasket material to reliably adhere to the metal with epoxy, as Tim suggested. I used heat-shrink tubing with an expanded diameter of ~1.5 inches. It's 3M brand, but I'm not sure which specific product. I used a hair dryer to shrink it because I don't have a heat gun. It seals well and ...


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Quite possibly. I have cranked on spouts like that and had them release, and had them fold up and crumble, since it was old pot metal. A grinder would be a good way to go about it. The connection, if it is as you say, will be in about 3" in. The rough in for a connection like that is usually 4" to 4 1/8" to the end of the male adapter, so a cut about 3" ...


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There are a few things you can. Get a rod that fits into the pipe about three to four inches without a lot of play and try to bend the pipe ever so slightly just enough to square it with the tile. You could also file down the part of the spout that hits the wall first and do so until the entire spout seats against the wall. Last but not least, just install ...


3

When the faucets are turned off when you are finished showering the diverter will usually not drop by itself. The diverter is held up by the column of water in the shower pipe. Once the column of water is reduced due to dripping of the diverter, the diverter stem will fall and reopen the spout to its normal position. How long that takes is dependent on how ...


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How do you know water it leaking back into the wall. I can't quite see from your pictures, did you uses plumbers tape between the copper threads and the new brass piece (three times around, in the direction of the threads)? I've installed some of these spouts. They never have a set screw. Once the rubber seal is well inside the spout water shouldn't get ...


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Yup, not uncommon. You could try cutting it like this: Then soak the threaded "boss" real good and carefully slice it with a hacksaw, preserving the threads underneath. I have had some success with this and it allowed speedy replacement without changing the wall nipple. Although if the nipple is not brass you should make efforts to get rid of it. When ...


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Funny I just mentioned doing just this to another person that had the screw on and wondered what the slot was for. I know they used to come apart fairly easily but that was 35 years ago. Most of the slip on’s are for copper so cut the pipe and slip it on. I would cut it long slip on and get an exact measurement. Then cut that amount off, there is usually ...


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Given that it's a soldered threaded fitting on copper pipe: Place a rag-class towel or other large rag in the bottom of the tub. Take a torch, heat until the solder melts, yank the fitting off (use thick gloves or pliers) quickly wipe molten solder clean with a rag before it cools and hardens.


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You could return it for the correct one. I guess my other option is to cut the pipe? Clean off the pipe with emery cloth, cut the threaded male fitting off and deburr the end of the pipe so you do not damage the O ring in the spout. Now you have pipe you can slip the spout onto. I do not think trying to remove the threaded part of the spout is a good ...


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Jacks advice is sound. I'd just like to suggest two other options. If you cut a rubber backing plate to the outline (slightly wider) of the drain spout it would fill the slight gap on one side and compress on the other. Also, if the gap isn't large, install the spout and fill the gap with caulking.


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Typically you would use a copper sweat by FIP 90° elbow (often called a wing back elbow, as it has tabs on it to allow for securing to backing). Then screw in a test nipple (or use a nipple and cap) while the tile is being done. Once tile is done, use a brass nipple of the correct length (best to buy a few of different lengths and just return the ones that ...


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Your right about over torqueing and snapping the pipe. Try this before cutting: 12 inch pipe wrench positioned on spigot for removal, 3/4 inch x 12-14 inch steel "cheater bar" onto wrench handle, pull wrench with medium force and release, position wrench opposite direction and repeat. Try doing this a few times. If it comes down to it use a sawz-all before ...


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So the adapter ring (the split threaded nipple) slips over the stem (the piece with the rubber O-rings). The stem is pushed into the supply pipe (in the wall). To connect the stem to the supply pipe the split threaded nipple is tightened until the stem is snug (the flat spots on the split nipple are there for a wrench). Next try sliding the chrome eschuteon ...


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FIXED IT. I can so relate to the posts here. I have the same spout in one of bathrooms in my 1939 home. It was the Cadillac of its day and local plumbing shops have breathlessly admired it - but no one could figure out what to do with it. I also saw many posts on the internet with homeowners frustrated and dreading the need to tear out a wall and replace all ...


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86-31220 Crane spout adapter will work for your problem. "bathroom machineries" has an adapter to fix this. Google the name and number.


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