3

Allow enough space. A cable is 2-5 wires inside a plastic sheath. A #14 wire needs 2.0 cubic inches. A #12 wire needs 2.25 cubic inches. A #10 wire needs 2.5 cubic inches. A #8 wire needs 3.0 cubic inches. A #6 wire needs 5.0 cubic inches. Beyond that, it gets complicated. All grounds together count as 1 wire of the largest size. So if you have a ...


3

You can't, but no need. If you're referring to the Tyco Electronics Romex splice kits, yes, they make those for 3-wire w/ground as well as 2-wire w/ ground. If you mean some other splice method, you have to read its instructions for whether it is suitable in-wall. As far as I know the Tyco is the only one that is UL-listed for buried in-wall splicing. ...


2

Never reuse a panel that has had a fire , the insulators may have been damaged and smoke , soot can leave conductive traces causing problems. Sub panels are easy because you can turn them off in almost all cases. If it is legal for a home owner to do there own work this can be a DIY but a permit should be taken out and have inspections to make sure the work ...


2

I am a huge fan of steel boxes for things like this for a couple of reasons. First, they contain arc faults very well, they won't melt or burn through like plastic, and if anything will help the breaker trip if a hot wire comes loose. Second, they solve a problem the last guy had: finding a proper cover for the box. Blank cover plates are perfectly ...


2

I would get some white heat shrink slide it over the conductors and make sure it extends inside the box the 1/4” and at least it’s width past where the sheath was removed. I have skinned the outer sheath several times in the past. The inspector only asked to verify if it was listed and then asked me to change from the black shrink tubing to match the color ...


2

Yes, that's fine. Fit it in the open/missing knockout hole, that way you don't have to plug that hole.


2

That should be fine, it looks like that's just a general purpose receptacle and it's OK to add a small load like a doorbell transformer to that circuit. It looks like there's room in the box, and clearance so the transformer will fit.


2

Use set-screw connectors like Polaris that are UL listed for the size. Also it would be a good idea to research the conductor and color selection, at very least figure out why the equipment ground is being accomplished by a blue neutral wire, the bare ground from the SE cable isn't terminated, and the metal box doesn't appear grounded.


2

This was my solution to a very similar issue. I used a Square D 30 Amp Safety Disconnect Switch. The cost factor was about the same as purple twist on things that may or may not catch fire or Polaris connectors that have to be crammed into a 4" box. Its a little bigger than one, but, believing everything is right and safe makes it very appealing.


1

No, all the conductors need to be part of the same assembly. A 4-hole version is NSi Model # NMS-3, they are about $15 from Home Depot.


1

These are al 12v lights, and 12v is pretty safe to work with. There should be nothing wrong with splicing all the positive wires and negative wires to one cable that then hooks up to the battery. Because they are LED lights running on DC current, polarity matters, and it might not be obvious on the wires which is positive and which is negative so pay ...


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