15

The use of these devices is limited to specific situations, which are described in 334.40(B) of the National Electrical Code. The 2011 version of the code had this to say. National Electrical Code 2011 334.40(B) Devices of Insulating Materials. Switch, outlet, and tap devices of insulating material shall be permitted to be used without boxes in ...


8

That qualifies as a junction box. Provide you did everything else correct, (affixed the box to something a rafter, stud, etc., connected the box itself to the ground wire inside, covered any previously knocked-out knock-outs, etc.) then you're fine.


7

Use a mechanical lug connector ("Polaris" or equivalent) AlumiConns are only rated for a maximum of 10AWG wire. For fatter work, you'll want their bigger brothers, mechanical lug connectors (sometimes called "Polaris connectors" after a common brand name) -- the smallest size of them is generally rated for wires anywhere from 14AWG to 4AWG, and as a rule, ...


7

If I understand your question correctly, the answer is it is irrelevant how you connect the standard receptacles past the GFCI one. What determines whether they are GFCI protected is how you connect the GFCI receptacle. If you connect the GFCI receptacle to the line connection only (usually using pigtails) and do not use the load connections, then none of ...


6

If you are discontent with the quality of wire nuts, you can go to a proper splice block. These are my go-to for anything larger than 6 AWG. Source The wires are inserted in the side, then they are tightened down from the top holes with hex keys to a specified torque. The holes where the hex keys go in are then capped. If the wires are near the ...


6

You'll need a box, and a pretty chunky one at that Splicing wire this large is indeed done with insulated mechanical splice connectors like the one you linked -- you will need one per wire, and a torque screwdriver or wrench, marked and calibrated in inch-pounds, to install them properly. As to containing the splices, you will need something larger than a ...


5

This family of lights uses all 120v wiring which means the full weight of NEC applies. You cannot "freestyle" splices in the manner you are talking, you must use listed products, which those cheapie butt splices probably won't be. They do exist, but O'Reilly Auto doesn't sell them and they don't use $5 crimp tools either. So here's how you handle "the ...


4

Yes, it must be in a junction box. There are splice connectors available for installation in a space where a junction box is not possible, but those splice connectors are explicitly rated for such a purpose; the connector you have proposed is not. Putting a junction box in an attic is not that big of a deal. Just do that.


4

You can splice diferent sizes, temperatures or types (NM, UF, THHN, SJOOW) cable anywhere it's legal to splice cable. It needs to be inside a junction box. The boxes need to be someplaces boxes aren't disallowed. The cables need to have proper cable clamps entering the box. The boxes need to forever be accessible without disassembling any part of the ...


4

Chop and solder. Of course, if the current adapter is dead, it can be difficult to establish correct polarity - but I think I see that labeled nicely on the present adapter (it's not always, though it should be.) For a tidy job, split the cords and cut the + and - wires at different lengths (so the joints are slightly offset, rather than being at the same ...


4

No, it's illegal to split wires like that. Aside from failing on 110.12 "neat and workmanlike", it is also paralleling (not allowed without special apparatus) and 110.3b "using a product inconsistent with it labeling/instructions". You need a lug connector rated for #6. Looks like an Alumiconn but is rated for #6. This is readily available at any proper ...


3

You'll need a pretty chunky box for those splices Wires 4AWG and up can't be spliced in any old junction box as they're simply too stiff and fat to fit into junction-box-sized boxes. Instead, you need to use what's called a pull box in the trade to house your splicing job, which invokes the box sizing rules in NEC 314.28(A), specifically (A)(2): (A) ...


3

Yes, because a poor connection due to subsequent corrosion can affect the signal which may well cause unreliable operation. There are waterproof junction boxes available which you should use.


3

You can have wires entering from one side or both sides. If I have 4 wires and I can arrange them neatly to come from both sides then I tend to do 2 and 2... But if 4 on one side is neatest or convenient...


3

To answer your question, split-bolts properly insulated (as you've done) certainly ARE rated for "live" conductors. Ask your inspector to provide the code citation prohibiting them. For decades split-bolts were the go-to splice for larger conductors.


3

You can have multiple circuits in the same box so long as you do not overload the volume of the box with devices and wires. See this answer by @Tester101 that discusses box volume.


2

For the 240V single-phase 60A circuit to my shop I used a 3-phase disconnect. It had 3 switched terminals, and also a ground lug bonded to the case itself. The inspector was fine with this approach. Elsewhere for another project I used Polaris lugs which I got off eBay for a reasonable price, and were very easy to work with. Far simpler than using a split ...


2

There are too many unknowns here for us to help you out. We don't know which switches you intend to use afterwards (locations), what access you have to joining the circuits together, or what the possibilities of joining them would be without knowing of your personal setup. Your setup, roughly as described to us is... <--- S --- S --- Kitchen Lights <...


2

I'm putting this up as an answer, mostly because there wasn't enough space in the comments. If I'm completely misunderstanding, please point it out, so that I and others might learn. The big box stores in the US sell something called the Tyco Electronics Romex splice kit. (Model # CPGI-1116377-2.) They say the following: Tyco Electronic's Non-metallic ...


2

Alumicons are rated for Aluminum Wire Range: Min #12 / Max #10 Copper Wire Range: Min #18 / Max #10 So your #6 Al wire is way over, not even close. One way to go would be Al-Cu split bolts, but making these up properly takes some skill. You may need a box extension for that box, too. The flexible metallic conduit is not connected to the box ...


2

What you want is a ceiling box that uses an old-work brace If you have ever been in a hardware/home-improvement store and wondered why some of the boxes had what looked like a long metal brace attached to them, like so (picture for illustration only): wonder no further. That brace is meant to go between adjacent ceiling joists and support both the box and ...


1

I am not an electrician but ... you could use a gray plastic outdoor junction box and cover attached directly to the back of the fixture. First plan the location for 2 self-tapping screws into the fixture. Then drill a 7/8" hole in the back of the junction box. Attach the box with the pigtails coming through the drilled hole. No additional grommet is needed, ...


1

You could just do a home-run of 10/2 from the service panel to the heater receptacle, and your problem goes away. Here I consider only options cheaper than that. Here's what I'd do. It's tedious, inelegant and involves messing with wires in the rain. But it works and is safe, assuming you are competent. TLDR: manually re-wire your house every time you ...


1

Don't try this (at home, or anywhere else for that matter) You'd have to defeat the function of the transfer device to actually power the heater (unless you wanted to use your generator to power it without throwing the transfer device over to the generator position). Furthermore, once you did that, the generator inlet would be live, with live prongs ...


1

Historically rebar has had high carbon so so very likely to crack if welded. Modern rebar is lower carbon but is not intended to be welded. Depending on the composition of the rebar you have a fair chance of no cracks in the weld zone. I would stay with the traditional wire joint.


1

You should not be splicing lamp wires outside the fixture or lamp. If you need to splice in the middle of a run you should replace the cord. Inside a fixture or lamp no heat shrink is required or needed. Heat shrink tubing just needs to fit over the area to be covered before shrinking. Article 400 Flexible Cords and Cables 400.9 Splices ...


1

As TFK mentioned, this is likely not going to be an easy task. It will surely require installing new wiring, and modifying the existing wiring. However, you have not provided anywhere near the detail required, for somebody on the other side of the internet to tell you how to do it. If you're not experienced with electrical work, you're likely going to have ...


1

As I interpret the code, no. That "T" splice isn't allowed, and not really elegant IMHO. 2011 NEC 110.14 Electrical Connections (B) Splices. Conductors shall be spliced or joined with splicing devices identified for the use or by brazing, welding, or soldering with a fusible metal or alloy. ... Where the article says you could solder the joint, in your ...


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