Hot answers tagged

6

Not really. Your option is pretty much replace the switch with a quieter one. Switches are $2 to $5. Since SE archives questions, I'll mention that some switches are loud because they are special switches rated to switch high current - in that case, don't downgrade.


6

Beware of UK fire codes before replacing that closer -- which you probably don't need to do. Almost all of the closers of that type are adjustable, see below. Rubber door bumpers are very cheap, can help a lot (but aren't as good as a well-adjusted, top-line, hydraulic closer), and come in a variety of sizes and styles. Here's some at Amazon that should ...


5

Yes there are guidelines for how to place the speakers. E.g. here is a Dolby 5.1 placement guide. But the short answer is A, B, C, F, and E in your diagram, if you have to pick from those exact spots. Also note that some higher-end stereos have a calibration feature that will use a microphone and test tones to detect the placement of each individual speaker,...


5

The proper answer would be to replace that mechanism with a hydraulic closer which has seperate adjustments for closing speed and latching speed (as most do). If you can't do that, padding the frame (perhaps with medium-density foam weatherstripping) would be worth trying. (Suggesting brands is out of scope for Stack Exchange. Many home contractors or ...


4

If you like the clock chiming but want to dampen the sound adding a piece of foam tape to the end of each of the chime rods or adjust the hammer throw so they don't strike as hard. I have a grandmother wall clock that has a bar to limit the hammer throw that did reduce the sound but not enough in our new very small home. I then added some foam double stick ...


4

I've attempted to build a reasonably soundproof music room in my basement and can tell you it is a tall order. I built a room when finishing my basement using double drywall with Green Glue, a floating double drywall ceiling with hat channel and isolation clips, sealed outlets, and re-routed HVAC and it I can still only play at a moderate volume without ...


4

I've used Lock Ease for this exact issue. Lock Ease is an amazing product. It's dry graphite, with an alcohol (I think) based carrier fluid packaged in an aerosol can. The carrier fluid help gets the dry graphite to penetrate then evaporates leaving no oily residue behind. It's made for lock cylinders, but I use it wherever dry lubricant (such as graphite) ...


4

Googling "acoustically transparent fabric" returns a variety of companies that provide materials that advertise the characteristics you require. For example: https://fabricmate.com/fabric/acoustic-fabrics/ or https://www.audimute.com/what-is-acoustic-fabric Transparent cloth is available but putting a picture on it is another challenge. The printing ...


3

A once per hour beep sounds a lot like a low battery indicator -- what else do you have running on batteries around the house? Some things to check: Internet/Phone - specifically in my area, Verizon FIOS often has a battery backup so that phones don't go out when the power goes out in order to better simulate POTS Actually, in many recent FIOS ...


3

Typically a main stack vent that is rubbing against a structural stud, sill plate, or drywall. I have fixed this ticking/clicking noise in two houses by cutting out the offending piece of 3/4" drywall and replacing with 1/2" on top of furring strips to give the pipe some room to expand.


2

Although the faucet looks to be an older style faucet it looks to me more like a model that is currently still in production and still available. Based not only on the photo but also on the video. That faucet has a cartridge instead of a stem valve like older faucets might have. Could be as simple as something stuck in the cartridge or the cartridge has ...


1

The Code says you are to, “have a STC rating of not less than 50 (45 If field tested) for air borne noise” in walls between dwelling units. (See ICC Section 1207.2) Also, any “penetrations for piping, cabinets, bathtubs, heating, plumbing, etc. shall be sealed, lined, insulated, or otherwise treated to maintain the required ratings.” (Section 1207.2) Also, ...


1

Ask the developer to provide the "sound transmission class" rating that was specified ( and guaranteed if it was ) and how that was implemented. I.E. what products or building techniques were used in the condo to achieve those spec's. Then cut the wall open to see if indeed that is true ??? Was there a guarantee in writing that you would not hear a certain ...


1

"If I remove remove the filter on the offending side, it doesn't happen." This tells us that it is an Airflow Issue and the culprit is in the filter mechanics. I am guessing you recently changed filters - perhaps to a new brand or type. Is the filter installed in the correct direction of Airflow - an Arrow on the side should point the way.. I am ...


1

Cut a piece of wood as a filler strip to fill the gap at the bottom of the door. Screw it to the bottom of the door, and when you remove it nobody will see the screw holes since they're on the bottom of the door. Next add adhesive backed smoke gasket to to top and sides of the door jamb. Finally, if you still need additional sound proofing, you can put ...


1

Consistent timing (23 seconds) seems to rule out expansion / contraction issues in my opinion. The fact that it briefly changed the time interval makes me think it's some sort of thermostat device, maybe snow melting tape? Where you hear it in the wall / floor can be misleading, because sound transmission can do funny things inside of wall spaces, especially ...


1

We line the ducts with “ductboard” insulation and use sound baffles. Often we’re concerned about hearing the sound of the fan coming on or turning off. We’ll use sound baffles to block the clicking sound from traveling down the duct. However, we usually “up size” the ducts to accommodate the added “blockage” in the duct. Also, we design the system so no ...


1

You want very stiff taut wire. Otherwise you will have to pull it VERY tight to pull it to the limits of its springiness so the sound won't get dampened by that spring action. Also preferably nonconductive. Maybe something in the FRP/carbon fiber family. My vote is for fiberglass electrician's pulling tape. Nonconductive, stiff and mad tensile ...


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