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"On-Center" is a term to indicate measuring from the center of one to the center of the next. This has the advantage of not getting into the detail of the actual width of the material being used. If you try to space a set of 2x4's by measuring between the side of one, to the side of the next, then you have to take into account the actual width of the stud. ...


8

A common method for building walls is to use vertical studs (often the classic "2x4"s) to support the surfaces of the wall: (Source) The standard spacing for these studs is 16 inches "on center", which means that the stud centers are 16" apart. This provides a good balance between strength and expense. 16" is also a common spacing for other building ...


3

Your previous question on stud/channel spacing answers this question already. The channels can be seen lining up with the studs in the above photo (to the left), and walls are normally framed with 16" on center studs. The channels are 16" on center. The distance you have marked in blue is not relevant. The worker started installing the channels on the ...


3

He's talking about "sound transmission class", often described as "STC". This is apparent from context, if you're familiar with sound reduction materials, but it's even made explicit earlier in the video. The host describes a variety of materials which are used to improve the sound blocking characteristics, and he uses the full name in those other sections. ...


3

The part pointed at by the blue arrow is a "doubled top plate". In this case, the wall it's on top of is a load-bearing wall. You can tell because the inner ends of the ceiling joists rest on it. If you pulled that center wall out, there would be nothing to support the top plate and therefore nothing to support the overlapped, inner ends of the joists. ...


2

You could try an acoustic curtain. You could build an interior door to make your exterior door more like an air lock and then sound proof that door/wall to your hearts content.


2

I agree with ecnerwal rubber pads would be best. We are a diy site and here to help you. Other things I prefer to use a concrete backer board screwed down to the flooring to mount tile to. Never put tile directly on chip board , OSB or most underlayments. Plywood will work but the others when wet come apart as the tile can allow moisture and then it ...


2

Yep...................that’s a stud.


2

Yes that is a ceiling joist if that is in a room over your head. If there is another space above that as another floor then that it probably also serves as a floor joist as well. It is somewhat conventional to refer to the joists seen overhead in a basement as just the floor joists for the first floor that caps the basement.


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The MDS notes that the components are latex polymer, water and CaCO3 (calcium carbonate). These are inert and should not interact with the sheathing.


2

Adding insulation to the floor will definitely reduce the sound to some extent, but that extent is hard to know without knowing everything about your exact situation. Your raised floor is acting kind of like a drumhead, amplifying the vibrations from your exercise machine. So the insulation can absorb some of that energy, but the sound will be reduced mostly ...


2

Fiberglass insulation helps more to reduce high frequencies than low. Since the sound made by exercise machines is primarily low frequency (i.e., dull thuds), such as the impact of feet, he insulation would not be very effective. Some ways to decrease low frequency noise include: Increase mass of surfaces: Add a layer of board to the floor. Increase ...


2

You could add operable shutters outside, and heavy sound deadening blackout shades inside. Even hanging heavy curtains would help.


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This is difficult to answer, because we can't read people's minds, but assuming it is correct that, for example, tile would cut the sound better than mineral wool, there are a lot of practical barriers: Tile is not made for this, it would be very difficult / impossible to install. Bat insulation can just be stuffed in between studs and it stays in place ...


2

If the MLV was not bonded to the joists, then there is no value in gluing the sheetrock to the MLV. Add extra screws if you like, but a standard screw pattern of 6 screws per joist will suffice. I know it is not part of your question, but RC-1 channel is a really cost effective way to add a lot of sound deadening to the ceiling in addition to the MLV, if it ...


1

I am going to point out that I do not approve the additional layer of drywall for ceiling. I just answered a question here - Should I use 1/4" drywall to cover ceiling texture or imperfections? - that addresses my concerns with an extra layer of drywall on ceilings. I love doubleing up drywalls on wall (vs furring out) so I am definitely "liberal" ...


1

Yes, both sets of screws are required. Two layers of gypsum board is generally used for two hour fire wall protection. The protection (and rating) comes from the proper installation, including proper nailing for both layers. If a fire develops and causes the top layer to fall, then the second layer would not have approved fastening to develop the two hour ...


1

The other answers are good, but you might also want to consider the effect this will have inside the room. Tile will prevent sounds from entering the room, but it also is very reflective, so the sounds inside the room will echo around. Mineral wool absorbs the sound going both directions, so it will be quieter inside the room. If the goal is too achieve and ...


1

Heavy, but not rigid. Rigid materials just propagate sound vibrations. Also: Material like tile would require upgraded structural members such as floor beams It would be much more difficult to install, assuming you want it to not jangle in your walls It would be very expensive


1

To begin - the obvious - if the disturbances are coming from above you need to soundproof the ceiling if it's also through the walls then you need to soundproof both ceiling and walls. Walls can be problematic because of window casings and outlets all of which will have to be modified or worked around. You don't want to directly attach the resilient channel ...


1

The obvious issue here is poor insulation between floors in your building. You've apparently researched prior questions and answers on StackExchange. If those simple options (eggcrate foam, acoustic sound barriers, etc.) aren't suitable your only option may be a more permanent and expensive solution. You don't indicate if your building (local council) ...


1

Unfortunately, the best solution to this would be a proper underlayment between the flooring and sub-floor in the above apartment. If the apartment is old, it may not have any substrate to speak of. If it was flipped specifically to be used as a rental, the contractor probably went with the cheapest material available. If you were redoing your apartment ...


1

There are two kinds of “sound control” problems: 1) airborne sounds, and 2) impact sounds. 1) Airborne sounds (talking, tv, etc.) is the easiest to control. 2) Impact sound (closing doors, heels clicking on floor from walking, etc.) is much harder to control, but sounds like this isn’t your problem. In order to control airborne sound various types of ...


1

Yes it is resilient channel, called RC1. The website you linked to has all that information.


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Acoustic foam could be used to dampen all noise and create some insulation, thunder & fireworks contain broad band noise everything from low frequencies to high frequencies, 60hz is the noise you hear around transformers. If you insulate and have a dead airspace that will also provide some shelter from the noise. I have trained hunting dogs and use a ...


1

You need to know how fresh the paint on that wall is and what the sheen of the paint is (matte, satin, semigloss, etc). Paint that is glossy and less that.. 6 months old will tend to still stick to things that are hung on the wall (I made up that time frame, but feels right to me). Even matte paint can have this issue, but it's far less likely. A good ...


1

Such is the down side of hard floors; they aid in sound transmission. Carpets used to absorb this, but nobody likes carpet any more. There is no building code requirement for sound proofing between floors. It is often done as a "feature", but not having it is not indicative of something being "wrong" with the construction.


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Obviously, the wall can’t be made to be floppy; but the soundproofing inside the wall can be floppy. In the Science of Acoustics, we call it a “Limp Mass Barrier.” This is typically why the Mass Loaded Vinyl is instructed to be installed against the studs and then drywall over it. This allows the barrier to move in 3-Dimensional space and bleed off the ...


1

The less dense material would be better for soundproofing, the 5/8" drywall. There's a lot that goes into soundproofing and there's even professions within the construction industry that specialize in it, acousticians. That being said I did a bit of research with this in college and it turns out that less dense materials provide better soundproofing. The ...


1

I'd remove the putty holding the glass in place. Check for looseness in the glass - it should be held in place with thin nails running parallel with the glass and into the frame. If it's loose, carefully tap in a few extra nails before reapplying the putty around the edges of the glass. Another option would be to throw a large brick at the window. It's ...


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