11

"On-Center" is a term to indicate measuring from the center of one to the center of the next. This has the advantage of not getting into the detail of the actual width of the material being used. If you try to space a set of 2x4's by measuring between the side of one, to the side of the next, then you have to take into account the actual width of the stud. ...


8

A common method for building walls is to use vertical studs (often the classic "2x4"s) to support the surfaces of the wall: (Source) The standard spacing for these studs is 16 inches "on center", which means that the stud centers are 16" apart. This provides a good balance between strength and expense. 16" is also a common spacing for other building ...


3

Your previous question on stud/channel spacing answers this question already. The channels can be seen lining up with the studs in the above photo (to the left), and walls are normally framed with 16" on center studs. The channels are 16" on center. The distance you have marked in blue is not relevant. The worker started installing the channels on the ...


3

He's talking about "sound transmission class", often described as "STC". This is apparent from context, if you're familiar with sound reduction materials, but it's even made explicit earlier in the video. The host describes a variety of materials which are used to improve the sound blocking characteristics, and he uses the full name in those other sections. ...


3

The part pointed at by the blue arrow is a "doubled top plate". In this case, the wall it's on top of is a load-bearing wall. You can tell because the inner ends of the ceiling joists rest on it. If you pulled that center wall out, there would be nothing to support the top plate and therefore nothing to support the overlapped, inner ends of the joists. ...


2

Yep...................that’s a stud.


2

Yes that is a ceiling joist if that is in a room over your head. If there is another space above that as another floor then that it probably also serves as a floor joist as well. It is somewhat conventional to refer to the joists seen overhead in a basement as just the floor joists for the first floor that caps the basement.


2

You could add operable shutters outside, and heavy sound deadening blackout shades inside. Even hanging heavy curtains would help.


1

The obvious issue here is poor insulation between floors in your building. You've apparently researched prior questions and answers on StackExchange. If those simple options (eggcrate foam, acoustic sound barriers, etc.) aren't suitable your only option may be a more permanent and expensive solution. You don't indicate if your building (local council) ...


1

Unfortunately, the best solution to this would be a proper underlayment between the flooring and sub-floor in the above apartment. If the apartment is old, it may not have any substrate to speak of. If it was flipped specifically to be used as a rental, the contractor probably went with the cheapest material available. If you were redoing your apartment ...


1

There are two kinds of “sound control” problems: 1) airborne sounds, and 2) impact sounds. 1) Airborne sounds (talking, tv, etc.) is the easiest to control. 2) Impact sound (closing doors, heels clicking on floor from walking, etc.) is much harder to control, but sounds like this isn’t your problem. In order to control airborne sound various types of ...


1

To begin - the obvious - if the disturbances are coming from above you need to soundproof the ceiling if it's also through the walls then you need to soundproof both ceiling and walls. Walls can be problematic because of window casings and outlets all of which will have to be modified or worked around. You don't want to directly attach the resilient channel ...


1

Yes it is resilient channel, called RC1. The website you linked to has all that information.


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