24

Unfortunately, since you do not own the space and cannot make deep changes to it, your options are limited. The general idea is to "decouple" the sound generation equipment from any rigid structural members, and to then isolate the air space that you are vibrating from any neighboring air spaces, so that the vibrations induced by the moving air into rigid ...


16

I wouldn't tear the bathroom wall apart... I'd tear the bedroom wall apart. What you are experiencing is the noise traveling through mechanical connections to the wall (screwed to studs) and the noise from the water passing through thin copper pipe (probably the Type M pipe rather than the thicker Type L). The only effective way I know of is to insulate ...


13

There's two principles to soundproofing that actually work: Isolation and Absorption. The trick is figuring out the right way to implement them. Be careful of anything that doesn't follow these two principles. The Absorption principle is how acoustic ceiling tiles and carpets work: They absorb the sounds as they pass through the material, or they keep the ...


10

Easier than sound-proofing a room would be to build a sound-proof box for the server using the triangular foam. Since it's a rack-mount server, just building some ducts for the front and the back and lining the ducts with the triangular foam you linked to above may be enough. An even better alternative might be to replace the system fans with low noise ...


9

You might look into ceiling fans with DC motors. While I have not seen a manufacturer talk about quietness, some reviews I've read talk about quietness. The biggest attraction to DC motors is the efficiency of the motors, getting more air movement with less power. My suggestion would be find a local fan / light showroom that has some of these on display ...


9

Reducing sound output from a typical bedroom can be extraordinarily difficult. The core problem is that sound travels through the point of least resistance -- you can get a good sound block in one area, but find it makes no difference since the sound just escapes from somewhere else. If you have a hollow core door, then that is one of your biggest sound ...


8

Hollow core doors are actually not totally hollow, they typically have cardboard glued inside which just serves to stop the panels from warping. Sound moves through both air and structure. Your main concern should be air - are the doors totally sealed, especially the gap at the bottom? The door should shut tight, and ideally be air-tight. You should ...


8

3/4” OSB board is better than 5/8” gypsum board. Sound control is measured in STC ratings (sound transmission coefficient). Here’s a website that tests various materials: https://www.ecopacificinsulators.com/uploads/4/7/1/6/4716609/sound_transmission_stc_rating.pdf Gypsum board is not as good as OSB board. 1/2” OSB board equals 5/8” gypsum board. As ...


6

That's your wet wall...all the plumbing is in there connected to the wall and floor (at least in the case of the tub). Ideally, you'd take down the sheetrock in the bedroom, then install a new row of studs that are not connected to the existing wall. While you are in there, see if you can better isolate the plumbing from the studs using rubber washers and ...


6

The answer suggesting using a spray foam to fill the cavities in a hollow core door is totally wrong. Hollow core doors have a "honeycomb" card board baffle inside designed to keep the door faces from warping. The spaces created inside are probably 15 square inches or so. Once the foam filled the baffled off space, you wouldn't be able to put in any more. ...


6

If most of the noise is coming from the hard drives, rather than the fans, then you need to dampen the vibrations from transferring from the hard drive enclosure to the furniture. The vibrations could be made even louder by the fact that it's on a shelf supported on its ends only - this could cause the sound to be even louder if the hard drives vibrate at ...


5

If sound proofing is your primary concern then you should build the walls all the way up to the roof, past the suspended ceiling. You should insulate the walls with sound-dampening insulation. If you are willing to spend more money and time, you should look into isolating channels that the drywall attaches to. This prevents sound from being carried through ...


5

Most electronic noise is made by the AC cyclic voltage, which is audible whenever that wave is transferred into something that can vibrate. That noise generally becomes more prominent (changing from a hum to a buzz) when there is something that changes the waveform to produce sharp "corners" (a "square wave"). A particularly noisy combination is a TRIAC wall ...


5

First off, a reality check; not trying to discourage you, just trying to set some expectations here: First off, the actual pressures you're dealing with are very small. Absolute pressure is measured in Pascals; 1Pa = .0001psi. Your 80dB sound is inducing pressure changes of approximately .2Pa = .00002psi (that's two hundred-thousandths of a psi). Second, ...


5

As per the comments, no, it's not a good idea. The box / soundproofing should have been installed before drywalling. If you want to do it right, cut a piece of the drywall out to give you room to work and install it properly, then close up the wall again.


4

Have a look at my answer on this question regarding acoustic foam. You will be able to cut down sound propagation significantly using it, by coating the walls and ceilings of your rooms with the foam. If you have the capability, you could make a significant difference by mounting the rooms on rubber bushings. This may be overkill for your purposes, but it ...


4

If you're not renting (ie, you own your room or whoever you're living with doesn't mind if you make modifications to the structure), consider the following: Type X drywall: While mainly designed for fire rating, it's very heavy, very dense, and helps in blocking sound. QuietRock: Designed for soundproofing, but very expensive. Consists of a viscoelastic ...


4

The fan will never be completely silent. As Tester101 said in the comments, the even if the motor is silent, the blades moving in the air will still make noise (sometimes a lot!). There are two sources of noise you need to minimize - the motor and the blades. Fans are loudest when at full power and tend to get quieter when the power is reduced. What I've ...


4

The reason the floor materials aren't as effective is because this problem is best solved with an air-gap and a flexible connection spanning that air-gap. But you have a hard time supporting a floor with that air-gap. Therefore, solving this problem via the ceiling below this floor is better, using resilient or sound attenuation channel there. That said, on ...


4

I'd go with either a layer of cork or polyiso rigid foam. Then a floating floor on top. A nearby residential tower actually requires the cork underlay. The rigid foam will work just as well at lower cost. The float floor can be two layers of ply staggered and screwed to each other, or a engineered hardwood product. See also the "Sound Isolation Store" ...


4

Best solution is to replace the doors. Don't know where you are from, but in UK normal 35mm plain doors cost about £20 each, when fire proof 30 min doors cost around £30-£40. And these fireproof doors are not only fire resistant, they are also much better in sound insulation - they are thicker and solid. Make sure you get them same size as the existing doors ...


4

Identification in order, P, Half-Round and Quarter-Round Referred to as door seal or weatherstrip. Commonly available for aircraft door seal and older automotive trunk and door weatherstrip. You can get EPDM variants for home door seal use from WeatherKing or MD. The larger stuff used in automotive can be obtained by the roll from industrial supplies ...


4

I am a master electrician and I have been on numerous projects with server rooms. Most of the time a good wall insulation works well to sound proof, if you can access the inner walls. There is another option that is a little pricey it's called sound soak. It is a fiberous panelboard that someone can order from a building supply house. You anchor metal ...


4

Short of replacing it with a sealed, sound-proof door, I suppose you could throw some foam on it e.g. http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0002F78UI/ref=cm_cd_asin_ and make sure gaps around the door are sealed; there are kits e.g. http://www.acousticalsolutions.com/door-seal-kits or something simpler to install like http://www.audimutesoundproofing.com/door-...


4

I've attempted to build a reasonably soundproof music room in my basement and can tell you it is a tall order. I built a room when finishing my basement using double drywall with Green Glue, a floating double drywall ceiling with hat channel and isolation clips, sealed outlets, and re-routed HVAC and it I can still only play at a moderate volume without ...


4

"Insulation" (in the ordinary construction sense) is essentially worthless for blocking sound. But if you need it for the conventional thermal reasons, then certainly go for it. When it comes down to the bottom line, nothing BLOCKS sound except MASS. That means either the mass of objects (like walls and doors) or the mass of air (i.e. DISTANCE). And any ...


4

I've used Lock Ease for this exact issue. Lock Ease is an amazing product. It's dry graphite, with an alcohol (I think) based carrier fluid packaged in an aerosol can. The carrier fluid help gets the dry graphite to penetrate then evaporates leaving no oily residue behind. It's made for lock cylinders, but I use it wherever dry lubricant (such as graphite) ...


4

Laminate flooring should typically not be pinned by cabinetry, walls, etc. It needs to be able to move slightly. I would cut a channel for the new wall plate. Be aware that many such floors have very hard wear layers. It can be hard on saw blades. Update: I now understand that you're talking about a suspended wall, or perhaps just furring strips on the ...


4

As an engineer having dealt with window and wall mount A/C noise problems for over a half century, I can offer you the most likely cause of the noise transmission and the solution to solve the noise problem. But first, we must understand that most, if not all, resonate noise vibrations in such units are being emitted by the compressor. Yes, the electric ...


4

For the best noise insulation, try layering materials with different acoustical properties. For example, you could sandwich some foam board between two layers of OSB. As the sound reaches each of the material transitions (air to OSB, OSB to foam, foam to OSB, and OSB to air), a great deal of it will be reflected back. Additionally, the foam will absorb ...


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