11

Reducing sound output from a typical bedroom can be extraordinarily difficult. The core problem is that sound travels through the point of least resistance -- you can get a good sound block in one area, but find it makes no difference since the sound just escapes from somewhere else. If you have a hollow core door, then that is one of your biggest sound ...


11

"On-Center" is a term to indicate measuring from the center of one to the center of the next. This has the advantage of not getting into the detail of the actual width of the material being used. If you try to space a set of 2x4's by measuring between the side of one, to the side of the next, then you have to take into account the actual width of the stud. ...


9

The answer suggesting using a spray foam to fill the cavities in a hollow core door is totally wrong. Hollow core doors have a "honeycomb" card board baffle inside designed to keep the door faces from warping. The spaces created inside are probably 15 square inches or so. Once the foam filled the baffled off space, you wouldn't be able to put in any more. ...


9

Easier than sound-proofing a room would be to build a sound-proof box for the server using the triangular foam. Since it's a rack-mount server, just building some ducts for the front and the back and lining the ducts with the triangular foam you linked to above may be enough. An even better alternative might be to replace the system fans with low noise ...


8

3/4” OSB board is better than 5/8” gypsum board. Sound control is measured in STC ratings (sound transmission coefficient). Here’s a website that tests various materials: https://www.ecopacificinsulators.com/uploads/4/7/1/6/4716609/sound_transmission_stc_rating.pdf Gypsum board is not as good as OSB board. 1/2” OSB board equals 5/8” gypsum board. As ...


8

A common method for building walls is to use vertical studs (often the classic "2x4"s) to support the surfaces of the wall: (Source) The standard spacing for these studs is 16 inches "on center", which means that the stud centers are 16" apart. This provides a good balance between strength and expense. 16" is also a common spacing for other building ...


6

If most of the noise is coming from the hard drives, rather than the fans, then you need to dampen the vibrations from transferring from the hard drive enclosure to the furniture. The vibrations could be made even louder by the fact that it's on a shelf supported on its ends only - this could cause the sound to be even louder if the hard drives vibrate at ...


5

Short of replacing it with a sealed, sound-proof door, I suppose you could throw some foam on it e.g. http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0002F78UI/ref=cm_cd_asin_ and make sure gaps around the door are sealed; there are kits e.g. http://www.acousticalsolutions.com/door-seal-kits or something simpler to install like http://www.audimutesoundproofing.com/door-...


5

I've used Lock Ease for this exact issue. Lock Ease is an amazing product. It's dry graphite, with an alcohol (I think) based carrier fluid packaged in an aerosol can. The carrier fluid help gets the dry graphite to penetrate then evaporates leaving no oily residue behind. It's made for lock cylinders, but I use it wherever dry lubricant (such as graphite) ...


4

If you're not renting (ie, you own your room or whoever you're living with doesn't mind if you make modifications to the structure), consider the following: Type X drywall: While mainly designed for fire rating, it's very heavy, very dense, and helps in blocking sound. QuietRock: Designed for soundproofing, but very expensive. Consists of a viscoelastic ...


4

Identification in order, P, Half-Round and Quarter-Round Referred to as door seal or weatherstrip. Commonly available for aircraft door seal and older automotive trunk and door weatherstrip. You can get EPDM variants for home door seal use from WeatherKing or MD. The larger stuff used in automotive can be obtained by the roll from industrial supplies ...


4

Best solution is to replace the doors. Don't know where you are from, but in UK normal 35mm plain doors cost about £20 each, when fire proof 30 min doors cost around £30-£40. And these fireproof doors are not only fire resistant, they are also much better in sound insulation - they are thicker and solid. Make sure you get them same size as the existing doors ...


4

I am a master electrician and I have been on numerous projects with server rooms. Most of the time a good wall insulation works well to sound proof, if you can access the inner walls. There is another option that is a little pricey it's called sound soak. It is a fiberous panelboard that someone can order from a building supply house. You anchor metal ...


4

In almost all cases this is a no. There are waterproofing systems you can use but not flooring pad. When you lay your tile the pad will move a little and cause issues. In essence with a pad you are creating a giant floating tile floor. Note: To reduce sound from the floor you want to do two things. Build up the subfloor. Adding an inch of plywood ...


4

I've attempted to build a reasonably soundproof music room in my basement and can tell you it is a tall order. I built a room when finishing my basement using double drywall with Green Glue, a floating double drywall ceiling with hat channel and isolation clips, sealed outlets, and re-routed HVAC and it I can still only play at a moderate volume without ...


4

"Insulation" (in the ordinary construction sense) is essentially worthless for blocking sound. But if you need it for the conventional thermal reasons, then certainly go for it. When it comes down to the bottom line, nothing BLOCKS sound except MASS. That means either the mass of objects (like walls and doors) or the mass of air (i.e. DISTANCE). And any ...


4

Laminate flooring should typically not be pinned by cabinetry, walls, etc. It needs to be able to move slightly. I would cut a channel for the new wall plate. Be aware that many such floors have very hard wear layers. It can be hard on saw blades. Update: I now understand that you're talking about a suspended wall, or perhaps just furring strips on the ...


4

As an engineer having dealt with window and wall mount A/C noise problems for over a half century, I can offer you the most likely cause of the noise transmission and the solution to solve the noise problem. But first, we must understand that most, if not all, resonate noise vibrations in such units are being emitted by the compressor. Yes, the electric ...


4

For the best noise insulation, try layering materials with different acoustical properties. For example, you could sandwich some foam board between two layers of OSB. As the sound reaches each of the material transitions (air to OSB, OSB to foam, foam to OSB, and OSB to air), a great deal of it will be reflected back. Additionally, the foam will absorb ...


4

The gap at the door allows the heated air in because if the gap is sealed once the room Is pressurized No more air can get in so the room will not heat or cool if the airspace is blocked off.


4

A "globe valve" would be more suitable for the task. Both ball valves and gate valves are intended primarily for shutoff - either fully open, or fully closed. A likely noise source is cavitation (bubbles forming and then collapsing) at the sharp edges in the flow when partially open. A gate valve has a plate with a (relatively) sharp edge that will ...


3

There are soundproofing curtains and soundproofing panels that can be found through an internet search for soundproofing curtains. They are not cheap, window curtains starting in the $300 range for an average size window (and yours are much larger). Panels start at about $200 for a 4x8 foot unit and they still need to be hung on some sort of frame. ...


3

There are a number of companies that provide windows with high STC ratings. The series 7000 windows from http://www.silent-guard.com appear to have STC of 40 and above. There are many other manufacturers that sell sound attenuating windows. I believe you are correct that to get what you want you'll have to specify specific windows. The way you describe ...


3

I think you will regret leaving old carpet on the floor and covering it up. If you are willing to spend $$$ on plywood, why not spend those same $$$ on some foam underlayment for a solid vinyl locking plank floor? The foam is a decent sound deadener, water-proof and resists mold and mildew. Old carpeting, even a low nap commercial type will hold moisture, ...


3

Fan motor noise is greatly amplified if the fan motor housing is fastened directly to the ceiling. Instead, using even a short 4" down pole will dramatically reduce motor noise. Without the down pole, motor noise is hard coupled to the ceiling, which then acts like a giant speaker cone. The size and composition of the connector wires has no effect on motor ...


3

To provide even a little noise reduction, you need to eliminate air gaps in the fence. If wind can blow through, sound can come through too. There is little you can do to improve the fence without first sealing the gaps. Adding foliage (i.e. shrubs or vines) will do nothing. To seal the gaps you need to After sealing the gaps, the next steps would be ...


3

Soundproofing as it relates to windows is all about mass -- the denser the materials, the more sound reduction you'll get. PVC is, indeed, typically more dense than the far more lightweight aluminium and so will will resist noise transfer more. However, the amount of surface area made up by the frame is absolutely dwarfed by the glass itself. Any ...


3

You could cut some holes in the drywall and use some blow in insulation. Something like dense-pack cellulose. What helps even more is to then glue another layer of drywall with something like green glue.


3

A material like this is designed to absorb and scatter sound. With medium frequency fan noise, it usually goes a long way to nearly eliminating the sound. If it were lining a box—even a partial one like a partition—and also covering all walls and other surfaces, it should be satisfactory. Also, you might inspect the gap under the door. If it ...


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