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5

There are several possibilities to consider. If you had really cleaned the joint beforehand with emery cloth or steel wool (both parts of the mated joint) there there is a good chance of a decent joint. The cleaning action helps clear out any oxidation on the parts that prevents the solder from adhering to the copper. (Keep in mind though that the simple ...


4

YES You can weld or braze galvanized but first the zinc needs to be removed or it won't stick well with either method and welding on galvanized metals releases nasty vapors that if breathed affect the liver. I usually grind the zinc back about an inch weld and then use a cold process galvanizing spray to re coat, it works fine, I am in the process of ...


3

Yes @rbhat, you absolutely can. I worked as a welder for years and worked maintenance at power plants and worked plant outages all over Texas and even at a refinery in Beaumont Texas and it is possible, but like Ed Beal said, you need to grind the galvanize off first. I've welded with it on, and with it ground off. Believe me, ground off is better, WAY ...


3

The pipes were sealed with lead. Prior to pouring the lead a packing material ("oakum" not sure on spelling) was packed into the joint. This material can be cut out with a screwdriver, trying to heat it would make a big mess. In most cases when I need to open a cast drain I will cut a small section out at least the diameter of the pipe but usually slightly ...


2

CPU heat pipes are filled with low-boiling chemicals, such as water or alcohol. At 180°, likely above the critical temperature of the coolant, there would only be supercritical fluid in the tubes, and the heat pipes would no longer function. Further, they might burst, whether soldered or brazed. Why not just add an auxiliary fan -- perhaps a squirrel-cage (...


2

The ball valve can, I assume, shut off the flow where you need to attach the adapter. In that case just close the valve, attach your adapter, and proceed.


1

For strength and durability Brazing ,hands down, is the better choice. Copper brazing rods have a hire melting point than the tin solder used for plumbing. I believe the copper rods need something like 1850 F melting point. Your problem may be that even though the CPU heat pipes are copper they are most likely very thin so if you apply 1800+ degrees of heat ...


1

There is some serious fake information on the "Net" regarding "silver solder". ; starting with Oatey ( Home Depot) who flat out lies about what they call "silver solder". The Halstead net site is good. AWS ( American Welding Society) identifies silver solders as having 45 % to about 60 % silver with copper, zinc, cadmium in various amounts. Melting ranges ...


1

What she probably meant was that, over time, a small leak might seal itself due to build-up of "salts" at the leak site. Minerals will precipitate out of the water as it evaporates and build up, salt might be a term used casually to describe the various minerals. I would not rely on this idea, the pipe needs proper repair.


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