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6

For solid 2D performance I've always been a fan of Microsoft Visio. I use it for everything from electrical layouts to micro electronics signal flow to civil engineering sketches. The learning curve is minimal if you've ever used any other Microsoft productivity suite. You can also download oodles of templates and design objects, as well as import images, ...


5

Sweet Home 3D runs in Java on Linux, and Windows. It is very easy to use and a good tool for a quick, "90% perfect" sketch. Very good for indoor sketches. For outdoor sketches I suggest Inkscape. Sometimes I use Inkscape, because I can draw things there much faster then in any CAD program. Of course I do not have the CAD features like "calculate area" and ...


4

This isn't exactly what you're looking for, but I would suggest that you try Autodesk Homestyler. An example in design mode And a feature that renders your design into almost life like pictures!


4

Graph paper. Seriously. Here is what I did to layout my kitchen (after trying sketch up): Measure the space. Outline your walls on graph paper 1 square = 1 foot. Make a few copies of this, and save the original. Make your appliances as little cutouts, or, just draw out on your draft-copies of graph paper until you like what you have. Unless you do this ...


3

-FreeCAD (Hard 3D, most precise) -SketchUpBIM (Moderate 3D, less precise) -Floorplanner (Easiest 3D, least precise) (allows one project for free) I've used all three of the above and settled on SketchUpBIM; fully measuring and designing my 100 year old house in 3D. It took a while to do, most of the time spent learning the software, but I've found it ...


3

Collecting the previous suggestions, I believe this is a good place to start a wiki discussion, since it's not a direct Q/A: http://www.domogik.org/ http://www.openami.de/ http://misterhouse.sourceforge.net/ http://lifedomus.blogspot.com/ http://www.opensourceautomation.com/ http://www.linuxha.com/linuxha/ http://www.catrpillr.com/ http://freedomotic.com/ ...


3

So far all the arduino/home automations I have seen are custom built. We are planning on using Domotic Home in our hacker group.


2

Take a look at Trello. I use it set up as a Kan-Ban board (think of loads of post-it notes in columns for "to do", "doing" and "done"). You can also add your own columns (so you could have a "suppliers" column for example). You can add images and ideas, as with Pinterest, and assign dates to cards to in order to track them. There are various plugins ...


2

All that Google has, from what I know (and googled to double check), is that they own Nest. They apparently had an "Android @ Home" project a few years ago, but I couldn't find any recent news on it. Personally I'd bank on Apple moving in on your home before Google-- simply because they already have their framework public, so developers can already start ...


1

I havent installed but have seen them they have a special remote that has a reciever in the lighting device (switch) you can program the remote for different settings like when you stop a movie lights on full, pause at 50% play at 25% will look arround and see if i can find some brands for you to check out


1

If you're looking for a 2D/3D software, I've found one called HomeByMe. I think it's pretty new and in a beta version but it helped me with my apartment remodeling


1

Take a look at a program called Moi3d I find that it is really easy to work with (more than SketchUP) You can see in 3D from all perspectives and if you have the skill you can also render the created designs. It cant do 2d Design, but you can export the perspectives into quite a few formats which you can later use as your technical drawing.


1

Also, if you're feeling brave: http://frame3dd.sourceforge.net/ Frame3DD is free open-source software for static and dynamic structural analysis of 2D and 3D frames and trusses.


1

Other than knowing they are out there, the money no object end of the spectrum is not a place I play much, and you can easily exceed $250,000 for software AFAIK. For practical applications where the right answer is not "hire a structural engineer and let him/her worry about the software" (or become one, if it interests you enough) you need to understand ...


1

Another open source solution for you might be www.jubito.org.


1

Did you have a look at FreeDomotic? You may be impressed by the flexibility and the polyvalence of the protocol and the core engine.


1

Look up a video demo for the LinuxMCE project. (Be sure to watch the video, it's hard to really "get it" until you've seen it in action.) Pretty impressive IMHO.


1

Another open-source project: http://majordomohome.com/


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