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10

How about Magnetic Christmas Lights? I've never tried them, but if they use a descent magnet it would be a winner. I've seen these before a Walmart or places like that. It looks like it would clip onto your shingles. They might be good for the short term of Christmas but I don't know how sun, wind and weather will affect their life.


9

In general, there is no problem in screwing drywall (or most other materials or light weight fixtures) into any framing members. This includes 2X studs, beams, steel studs or other variants on these. There are restrictions on notching and drilling large holes. Dimensional lumber is most forgiving of these modifications, but manufactured beams have ...


8

As far as I know, it doesn't really matter as long as it's vented outside. Venting into the attic is Very Bad -- in the winter, the humid air will condense and (if cold enough) freeze, and you'll effectively have water in the attic. For any vents, the straighter the run is, the more efficient and quieter it is. Avoid corrugated pipes, and avoid bends and ...


7

Oh, wow. I'm sorry, but your roof is probably bad. If you can get the money you paid four years ago back (doubtful), I would, but you probably need to get that entire mess torn off all the way down to the decking, and probably quite a bit of the decking near the edges of the roof too. You can tell because the shingles look "lumpy" and have a rolling look to ...


7

You'll be working in a "damp" location, so you'll want to prevent moisture from entering or accumulating within the box. Since there's not likely to be moisture above the box, you probably won't have to worry about protecting the back side of the box. Because of this, you can probably get away with any type of box. When I did this, I used a weatherproof ...


7

I use small vinyl-coated cup hooks. I screwed them my first xmas in this house 10 years ago and have never had a problem with them. Just hook the lights on every year. Easy up-easy down.


5

Mold will not be a problem unless the area gets and stays wet. Of more concern would be birds, bugs and squirrels. Landscape fabric could be stapled quickly and cheaply, if it will be several days.


5

Would Velcro Christmas light hooks work? I used them one year (not this exact brand though) to good effect.


5

I use the all-in-one clips from here - http://goo.gl/ldASe After the first season of use they can become brittle and break, I usually have to replace a few of them every year but they are the best I've used. This is my house.


4

If you're trying to cut in place, I'd personally go with drilling an initial hole, and then cutting the shape of the vent with a "sheet metal nibbler". The nibbler will let you cut from one side, as there's a small bit that you insert into the hole, and sheers off a small roll of material (somewhere near 1/8", depending on the exact pair). You can also get ...


4

Its just trim molding, to hide the cut edge of the soffit where it abuts the wall. It should be re-attached for both appearance and critter protection. You can add some foam insulation, which will help seal the edge. A bead of exterior caulk, then the molding, then another bead if there are any gaps in the molding-to-wall or molding-to-soffit, Use 1" to ...


4

I can tell you from experience in my house a slate roofed colonial, it will make a difference. Even with the fan mounted in an attic window that is that is 3 inches off the floor of my walk-up attic the temperature drop in the attic was 30 degrees.Most fans will have a spec sheet telling how many square inches of ventilation opening they require. It is ...


4

As mentioned by other comments and posts, the soffit needs to remain vented. For what it is worth, that one piece won't matter if it is perforated or not, (the whole soffit is open on the inside, that is a good thing) but use perforated soffit anyway so it matches. This material is available at any big box store. The picture have captions in them that ...


4

I think you would want the shower ceiling to be the same height as the rest of the bathroom especially with 8 ft ceilings. An average height man with raised arms would touch a 7 ft ceiling. Who wants that? Everybody wants higher ceilings rather than lower. The only possible benefits of a 7 ft ceiling might be to better confine water vapor and mist to the ...


4

No. In fact I removed the one in my previous home after years of dealing with peeling paint. I'm honestly not sure whether it was a fashion trend or whether folks felt like it kept the shower bay warmer in a chilly house.


4

It was popular in the 1980s and 90s to have soffits above the kitchen cabinets. So to directly answer your question Yes there is some justifiable reason to have remodeled to then-current trends, such as if one was trying to maximize resale value at the time, or were just beginning to modernize the entire house. Of course that is based on personal preferences,...


4

You need a box in that location , an "old work" box can be placed into the hole and it will provide the mounts for the fixture. Old work boxes have tabs or wings that anchor to the back side of the wall.


4

This old house has an excellent video on why the soffit location is bad, and how to vent through a common shingle roof. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PqrZWd_CQIE How to Vent a Bath Fan Through the Roof, August 2014. The homeowner installed the same way your contractor did, and in just one season there was mold under the roof. Your contractor should pay ...


3

In terms of most efficient usage of money, I suspect weather stripping will have a bigger impact on an older home. Sealing all the gaps around doors and windows will cut down on drafts. If fixing a window involves replacing it with a new energy efficient model, all the better. Once the drafts are solved, insulation is usually next. But that can be expensive,...


3

1It is very wrong. You CANNOT have a cord passing through siding, walls, or any other finished structure/surface. For both code and safety reasons. The receptacle MUST be outside. If it is close to the heat tape you'll just need to coil the cord up. National Electrical Code 2011 Chapter 4 Equipment for General Use Article 400 Flexible Cords and ...


3

This area was just very poorly designed. Air is supposed to come in so that isn't a big deal but you do need to close it up for animals and bad weather. On the far side (inside) you need to extend the wall up to give some backing to your channel. Can be some plywood or a couple 2x4s. I know it is a PITA to get to but if you don't get something up there ...


3

Soffit vents ensure a continuous flow of outside air on the underside of your roof. In cold climates, this prevents two critical issues. First, from condensation on the underside of the roof from moist air in your home or from earlier in the day that has made its way into the attic. And second, from snow that falls on the roof from melting at the top, and ...


3

I can only advise you on what I think you will find. You already mentioned the best possible way to start correcting the situation, remove the gutter and finished fascia, but you cannot stop there, you will need to remove the top piece of siding that meets the soffit as well. My thought is, the metal soffit is very thin, and the soffit that you neighbor has,...


3

The slightly scruffy plumage and a flash of red on the tail but not on the head makes me think it is a juvenile red-shafted flicker - do you happen to be in the west of North America? - so it may not have quite figured out what a tree is yet. First, you'll want to repair the damage and re-paint. Take the opportunity to check for insect boreholes as that ...


3

Chances are good that there was still enough airflow happening with the vented soffit panel in place. I'd try it out with the new fan and see how well it works before cutting the soffit up. Since the vinyl soffit was applied directly over the plywood soffit, you could install J-channel around the vent and cut the soffit to fit. You could also replace the ...


3

I would add soffit vents. If it's wood soffit it's fairly easy to cut the holes with a small rotary saw or an oscillating multi tool. Then screw on prefab vents from any outlet supply. If it's aluminum soffit I've replaced solid panels with vented also and you could space them out and put in as only as many as desired. If it's aluminum fascia on front then ...


3

You would want to use a bi metal hole saw. You are right to not want to use a wood only hole saw, the teeth tend to grab, not cut. Try something like this: Good luck.


2

Given the options (and I still agree with my earlier post and Greebo's answer of "none of the above, replace your soffit with a vented version"), I'll go with option B. Some other thoughts: Get a good seal between the vent and your existing soffit, which would won't be able to do with your first or last option. Make sure there's a screen of some kind in ...


2

Were I you, I"d go for the big full size soffit panels ALL the way around. You pretty much can't have too much attic ventilation - you can have too little.


2

Rather than trying to cut holes and add vents, you could also replace these with vented soffit skirting. E.g. This one can be picked up from your local HI store:


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