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2

In general upgrading the wire is an acceptable solution, but you will probably also need to have new breakers at the laundry end of the wire. You will need to put a new breaker box in the laundry at the end of the wire and have breakers for your three appliances there. there are probably rules about which parts of the room are allowed to have the breaker box....


0

I want to start by saying that I'm not an electrician. There is a lot of training and certification/insurance that goes into that. I just want to share my experience with my first house I purchased almost a year ago and what I learned along the way. There isn't a yes or no answer to your question. You have to figure out what is going on and determine what ...


27

Grounding is no longer red-alert essential Since there are other ways now to provide better protection. Particularly, GFCI protection is so good that you're allowed to fit 3-prong outlets as long as they are protected by a GFCI device (somewhere in the circuit). So all these are acceptable: A socket that's obviously a GFCI, with "Test" and "...


9

TL;DR Unless there is a major panel replacement needed, you're looking at hundreds to replace every receptacle and/or add GFCI protection, not thousands. The electrical code (NEC) and actual practice have evolved over many years. Ungrounded receptacles are not ideal, but are not inherently unsafe. If they were, then there would be no such thing as devices ...


15

There are a few possibilities: The bathroom outlets were changed to three-prong and the ground screws are unattached. This means they're not grounded and are potentially unsafe. New wiring (or retrofit grounds) were run to the bathroom. This means they're grounded and relatively safe (they should still be GFCI protected). The outlets in the bathroom have &...


1

They are an invention from a time when there was a lot less electrical products and before the time of electric toothbrushes. They were designed for powering electric shavers only, as the name states. Their use has morphed over time to now charge devices. However, you are not supposed to use two at the same time. They are designed to power a single use item ...


4

Those shaver sockets are actually a small transformer with 1:1 windings. That provides mains voltage in, and the same voltage out. The only difference is the output voltage is "fully floating" with absolutely no ground return or reference. You could accidentally touch the voltage and the faucet with no current flow. The only way to get a shock ...


0

Instead of the tape (or on top of the tape) add a couple of nylon cable ties. Speaking of microwave bulbs, years ago my Kenmore microwave had a burned-out small halogen bulb that was integral to a similar base as yours - no threads, just glued in. No replacement was avaiIable. I broke away the bad bulb and soldered in a standard small halogen. Has worked ...


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