Hot answers tagged

11

The first thing that comes to mind is to: Pick up all of the tiles Excavate a few inches under where they were Put some small gravel down and compact Put some paver sand down and compact Reinstall the tiles Another way to go would be to lay a bed of mortar down over some gravel. That would lock them in really nicely as well.


9

Are the walls insulated? If not, do that first. Most of the heat escapes there...especially the part nearest and above the ground level. With a fully insulated wall, you might not even need to insulate the slab. in MN we insulated our walls and then left the concrete floor as-is (stained it). Only on the coldest winter days did we need to turn on the ...


8

This is done all the time in slab-on-grade houses. The slab is there to give you a nice surface to park on, but is not required for the structural integrity of the garage. So, sure, go right ahead.


8

I would say 10 or 11 bags (depending on how sloppy you are). 0.2 * .05 = .01 .0929 / .01 = 9.29 bags Since you never get perfect yield from a bag, I would personally go with 11 bags.


8

That is not normal or acceptable workmanship. The correct response to a foundation that far out of specification is to require the foundation contractors to rip it out and try again, or not get paid. Clearly that point was missed. The larger problem for you is that you are already entered into a contract with an incompetent, lying builder. I'd have your ...


7

If it was poured onto an already existing slab, I would try separating it from the slab first to see if it can be broken away and leave the floor intact. Note: The pad should weigh about 815 pounds (370 kg) so light duty efforts are inappropriate. Obtain two heavy steel digging bars like this along with some scrap 2x4s or similar. With heavy gloves on, ...


6

You should get a batch mix for this so that you can continuous pour it from end to end in a short period of time. This is the best way to assure a uniformity and even drying time for the whole slab. Mixing in small batches often ends up with one end ready for finishing when you are still messing around with mixing at the other end. When you get it all ...


5

You can install an interior weeping system similar to what you would normally do on the outside, but without the waterproofing. Start by jackhammering out about two feet of floor around the edges of your garage, as close to the walls as you can get. Dig down until you reach dirt, and if that's not at least two feet down, keep going. Now, put down a couple ...


5

If you want to do radiant infloor heating you will need to insulate under the slab. If you don't you will constantly be rejecting heat to the ground underneath the slab, and it will suck excess heat out of the system. If your not going to insulate beneath the slab, abandon the idea of radiant infloor. Your also going to have to use HE Pex for radiant ...


5

Expanding drain plug, fits into inside diameter of pipe than expands to seal when the nut is tightened.


5

Sigh. Cheap builders are forever spending thousands on concrete, but unwilling to spend a few hundred on steel to make the concrete properly reenforced. Nobody sees the steel, but the lack of it does show up eventually. Unlikely to be a major issue, might be a path for water or bugs, so probably sealing it would be best. But consulting an engineer is good ...


4

Concrete will crack naturally on its own unless it is given a place to crack such as control joint or expansion joint. As the concrete is curing it is heating up and expanding. In the summer time, I have seen the slab crack before being able to walk on it. Regarding footprints, it is tacky. However, the roughness can actually help the concrete and ...


4

thank you so much for the advice and comments. The inspectpr came by yesterday and confirmed our concerns! He is going to fail the framing inspection and has provided a write up for all the items we were questioning. Keeping our eyes peeled for any issues moving forward.


4

10 stout men to tip the slabs on edge, then log rollers, Egyptian style. Maybe a bit of ramp to get them up to their final resting place.


4

155 pounds per cubic foot seems a typical number for concrete. A cubic foot is 12x12x12 inches, or 1,728 cubic inches. Your larger slab comes to 7,625.75 ci and should be right about 684 lbs. Your smaller slabs should be about 464 lbs each. If they have not cured for a month or so, they will be weak/fragile as well as heavy. So you might want to think about ...


4

It has always been "tie wire". Just do a search, that is all you will come up with.


4

If you don't care about leaks (or want drainage, so the dog is drier) forming the rim, pouring the rim, and then pouring the central slab is similar to whats typically done in a house basement. The joint between the rim and the slab will generally leak. If you pour a slab and then pour the raised edges on top, expect failure - if to scale, those are very ...


4

Insulated slabs usually have vapor barrier underneath. Since you did a test and found no moisture, there should be no problem installing vinyl flooring on it.


4

Lots of slabs are covered in carpet without any problem. It depends on your specific slab. To know you need to test the slab. Take a trash bag tape it down to the floor. In 24 hours pull it up. If the floor looks damp or there is moisture on the bag a barrier will be needed if it is dry no barrier is needed. I have epoxy painted to seal damp floors made a ...


3

If you don't have gutters and the grading around your house isn't sloped away, I'd start there. It's relatively cheap to do and will eliminate most problems. It's also nice, if you have a door at the bottom of a roof edge, to not enter under a waterfall. Once you've done that (or if it's not possible to fix the grading) and the foundation is still wicking ...


3

Yes, it's a vent for a toilet. If it were an in-floor shower, you might see a P-trap and vent, but the toilet has the trap included in the fixture. The reason you see the vent here and not other locations is that a sink will be vented starting in the wall rather than inside the floor, and the toilet is often after the sink, making the line from the sink to ...


3

If I were a buyer I would beware. Why is the house frame not firmly on the foundation? 2" off the slab is more than half the width of the 2x4 base of a wall.


3

The best bet may be to build a frame around the area you want your pool. This can be made from either 4x4 pressure treated timbers or pressure treated landscape ties. These can be attached by drilling and screwing through them into the cedar that is already there or by drilling into the concrete to hold stakes (you can use large galvanized nails) that go ...


3

Putting tile over a painted surface can be risky. Sure looks like removing all that paint would be a chore and maybe hazardous (lead based paint if pre 1978). We have put tile over such surfaces by roughing it a bit and putting a scratch coat of "floor patch and leveler" over the entire surface. This is a good bonding agent on stable subfloors. Another ...


3

If your shower isn't sealed behind the tiles the water can leak past the tile and grout down into the space. Very common as most builders only use green board and put tile up over the top. This is asking for troubles down the road. The drain could also be leaking as you believe. In that case plug the drain at the surface and take a shower. If you see water ...


3

Back in the day, at least my day, the building code allowed for a maximum of a 1" corbel (extention). I do not see any cracks in the photo that suggests shifting has occurred. If there is a basement or maybe not, while the foundation is laid, or in the case of concrete, while it is poured, the top of the wall can rack out of square. The break between the ...


3

Use a biscuit joiner. Then glue and clamp to dry. But depends what you using them for. There not going to be heaps strong if the timber spands over a distance.


3

Plumbing in concrete slabs pretty much requires ripping the floor open to make any changes to it. I suppose if you chose a new toilet with a LARGE base and were very careful you MIGHT be able to keep all the floor damage under it, but that's making assumptions that you'll be able to rework cast iron pipes (not the most cooperative things) through a fairly ...


3

After a lot of time wandering the faster aisle at my local Ace, I ended up finding a rubber grommet that fit snugly around the 6d nails I am using. I then took the grommet and found a fender washer that fit the grommet inside it (ended up being a 1/2" washer). Then I drilled a hole in the floating bottom plate large enough for the grommet to drop into (...


3

Normally your drain pipes are ABS plastic having them bedded in the rock is fine. If your supply is copper (I do not recommend copper under a slab) it should be coated so the corrosive effects will not cause pin holes. I have had to replace several sets of copper pipe under a slab it is very expensive the houses were not very old maybe 20 years. I would use ...


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