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Wikipedia In architecture, a baseboard (also called skirting board, skirting, mopboard, floor molding, as well as base molding) is a (generally wooden) board covering the lowest part of an interior wall. Its purpose is to cover the joint between the wall surface and the floor. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baseboard The purpose of a baseboard is ...


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Trim in most all forms (window casings, baseboards, even crown moulding at times) is primarily there to make the finishing between two different surfaces easier. Done well, they also add detail, of course, but for the most part, it's a practical solution first and foremost. You could certainly do what you propose, but some of the challenges you will run ...


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As for the gaps between the bottom of the base board (skirting) and the floor ... that is normally covered over with a base shoe molding. Base shoe is a small dimension molding that can be pressed down to fit the variations in the floor surface. Base shoe molding is normally only skipped when carpeting is going to be installed on the floor. A nice trick ...


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Your inclination is correct. A straight pull outward could chip the new paint. Your second inclination is also correct. You should carefully cut through the paint at the paper with a sharp utility knife (sometimes called a razor knife). Hold it horizontally, with a very slight downward angle at the join of the molding and paper. If you have difficulty ...


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I would use something like one of these utility knives to slit the edge of the paint to allow the paper to pull out. Using a scalpel would not be recommended because there is much less control of the cutting device.


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There are a few different options that I'd consider: Ordering made-to-measure skirting for the dining room that's taller than the skirting you have the kitchen, but with the same top profile. This allows the tops of all skirting (and hence the grooves) to line up. Stepping it down with a transition piece. You can either cut at 45 degrees and have the ...


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UPDATED: I misread about the masonry walls. I've actually installed base trim using trim screws and plastic plug anchors. It works fine, but the holes in the trim are larger. ORIGINAL: Glue is only used for joints, and nails pull out of the wall fairly easily when the boards are removed. They can then be pulled through the boards from the back side so ...


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As others have pointed out, the two main reasons are practicality and aesthetics. It is much easier to build with a baseboard. But also, you are fixing cosmetic imperfections that will look incredibly jarring to the eye if they were left exposed. Notice, for example, that baseboards often times also have a "quarter round" attached to them (example). The ...


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As for the best way to solve this properly, I'd say "put the house on a foundation" but that's clearly not what you are looking for. Digging the trench to the point(s) where the water and sewer connect and then building an insulated box with a hard skin to keep animals out of it (cementboard or metal) to contain the pipes running vertically. Otherwise you'...


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You would drill from below with a long bit. I assume you wall is typical studs with drywall or plaster. You should be able to get enough angle for the hole to come out in the wall. Do this before you insert the box. Then you can run your wire into the box before mounting it.


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I would use the type of knife specified in the other answer(s) but I'd advise doing a "test cut" in a less conspicuous area first. My inclination is to hold the knife as vertical as possible and cut the paint and paper at the same time and thus cutting off the exposed paper while leaving the paper that is hidden underneath in place. There's much less ...


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