Hot answers tagged

28

I applaud your effort at frugality and environmentalism. The "throwaway" mindset peeves me to no end. Many folks change out fixtures just to change the look or size, and there are plenty of good units to be had. In fact, I'll soon be swapping out a perfectly serviceable round-bowl toilet for an elongated one just to better accommodate an add-on bidet. Some ...


13

Bring your Ptrap up or your Sanitary Tee down. AS noted by others you can cut the tail of the piece where it goes into the top of the Ptrap shorter ( thereby bringing the Ptrap up ), This will allow you to have the down hill slope you need for the disposal. You may need a longer tail piece from the bell on the basin into the tee from the disposal. OR ...


12

In the OP's installation the last horizontal run going into the vertical drain appears to be slightly higher than the horizontal run coming from the disposer. I think this will cause the horizontal disposer run to retain liquid. It appears that some of any liquid waste going into the left sink drain would flow back into the disposer. It seems to me that the ...


11

The valve needs to be downstream of the trap, basically in the position an actual vent would be. source Also, be sure they're legal where you are. My local inspector forced me to run a new vent line and tie into the existing stack above the upstairs sink drain when I wanted to add a laundry drain.


9

Start by making a template. Using a dry-erase marker, draw a line on the sink where it will meet the new cabinet cutout. You can hold a ruler flat against the rectangular piece shown in the photo to guide the marker. Temporarily remove the currently installed rectangle and replace it with a rectangle of material from which the template will be cut. Cut ...


7

If you are going to spend good money to build an addition on your home why would you even consider someone else's thrown away junk. Spend money on "up to date" new and modern water saving toilets, sinks and faucets. If you supply them with old junk the plumbers will curse you for making them use this old stuff. If the plumbers have to clean the old stuff ...


7

You DO realize you can (perhaps even "are supposed to") cut excess length from the slip-fit trap parts? They are supplied long, but don't need to STAY that way. You can cut most of the tube leading to the trap off, thus raising the trap. Opioninated commentary: I'd also lose the "flex section" on the other side of the trap - it is the part of this setup ...


5

I think for a temporary fix you could use a good two-part epoxy. I don't consider it a DIY thing to completely restore a sink like that, but there are companies that refresh bathtubs. I'm not sure what they apply would be robust enough for a sink, though. From the look of the nearby chips and the crack extending from the new damage, that sink has served ...


5

I'll be honest here: old toilets are terrible. I bought a house with original toilets from the mid 70s. These things were beasts that took a whopping 2 gallons per flush, and relied solely on gravity to do the work, which meant that it sometimes failed to get all the stuff down the drain (which meant another 2 gallon flush). That's pretty crappy (literally)....


4

Speaking from experience of doing just what you suggest... When doing up a house (UK) for my daughter we got a complete bathroom suite from Freecycle. All the porcelain and the enamelled bath were in good condition. The sink and bath waste fitting points took standard new wastes and traps, the sink just needed a suitable tap (single hole fitting). The ...


4

Looking at the top back of the sink, there are two screw holes provided, but these are for location not full weight bearing. Having removed a similar sink in the past, there should be two (ornate) cast iron arms which may also double as towel rails which are secured to the wall and support the weight of the sink. Another version would have two posts that ...


4

The flange piece connected to the sink looks like it isn't mounted flush and could cause leaks. Readjusting the garbage disposal might fix that. It also looks like you have enough room to get rid of that adjustable trap and install a regular one. The "jog" in that trap and the excessive length will probably cause water to rise into that sink when you run the ...


3

The threaded connection of the basket to the tail piece should have some Teflon tape wrapped around the threads before it is threaded together. It needs to be taken apart and the tape installed correctly. It should be the responsibility of the person who did the work incorrectly.


3

The drain pipe on your sink goes straight down, but then it should go through a U-shape and go back up again for a few inches, and then go on its merry way. This U-shaped bit of pipe has a name, and Admiral Ackbar really wants to say it... Anyway, the idea of this "trap" is that the U is supposed to stay full of water all the time, all the way up to the ...


3

You are correct that there is trim made for this, but if you've never seen one the term for it is hard to figure out... It's called a pipe escutcheon and they come in two flavors. If you can disconnect the pipe and slip the pipe escutcheon over the end, the single piece models look better and will seal better. If you don't want to mess with the pipe, they ...


3

This is the waste drain vent penetration through the cabinet which would lead into the wall where it would join up with both the vent going to the roof and the drain that likely goes down and hooks into other bathrooms that are stacked below yours. For air sealing, I'd use air sealing tape. tescon-vana blue air sealing tape or if you want to go cheap you ...


2

I agree you have more piping than you need, but as long as the pipe W shown in the figure is lower than the garbage disposal outlet you are OK, otherwise water will sit in the garbage disposal. Ideally, you want the highest part of the drain to be a few inches below the garbage disposal drain.


2

You should be able to unscrew the upper part of the drain, the part that's in the basin where your stopper is located, from the tailpiece.


2

That style of sink drain that you show has a trap at the bottom. A trap on a sink, regardless of the style you show or the traditional U style, serves two purposes: Catch things that people drop down the drain Prevent sewer gasses from coming up This means that any water device that has a drain in a house must have some trap. IF your sink did not have the ...


2

Your sink probably isn't painted. Copper goes through several stages of oxidation (roughly the equivalent of iron rust). The final patina is the dark, durable finish you see there. Painting it would've completely defeated the point of building it with copper in the first place. Over time copper will naturally change colors – transforming from a shiny ...


2

It all depends on the use of the sink. Typical counter height ranges from ~ 30 inches to 36 inches. In bathrooms it is typically lower - 30 - 32 inches, but 36 inches is standard for kitchens in the US (dishwashers and slide-in ranges are sized based on a 36 inch high counter). A sink can even be a little higher, though above 36 inches a sink can be harder ...


2

A separate trap won't solve this problem when the water backs up through the trap it will do the same thing. The trap is there to stop sewer gas from entering the home.


2

Thanks to all of your comments I completed this task. Here is what I did: Bought a $5 compass from Ocean State job lots tacked a small 1/4" lauan to the side, butting against the sink Transferred the curve to the lauan. Did this about 6 times until happy Cut the curve with skill saw about 80 degrees, gently sanded the curve to the line with a pwr sander, ...


2

It's a problem, with drains you can never reduce down you must always increase. The the 4"pipe going into the 1 1/2" is a problem.


2

It definitely needs to slope away down to the drain. Specifically a quarter inch per foot. No more, no less. The reason for this is that at a quarter inch per foot waste water tends to sort of oscillate up one side and then the other of the pipe. This effectively washes the pipe as it goes. If you have a negative slope any debris will have plenty of time to ...


2

Many faucets have an aerator device and a wire mesh screen at the point where the water comes out. The piece is screwed on. If your faucet has something like this, remove it and check for debris. (Pay attention while disassembling: the order and direction of the parts matters with some designs.) The assembly uses a "normal" (right hand) thread, but often ...


2

You could try to split the difference slightly "bathroom weighted" and branch off to the kitchen down the line so that the cold water column is reduced to either fixture once one has operated it's a little difficult to calculate gpm based on pressure and pipe diameter. Also static pressure will drop with a draw. You can't calculate that without a field test. ...


2

The entire lower plastic portion is the locknut. Have a helper hold the strainer in place from above using a strainer wrench (it's a thing, sometimes called a spud wrench), or by jamming the handles of channellock pliers into it, while you get under there and unscrew the whole plastic body from the strainer (turn CCW if looking up at it from below).


2

It looks like you have 1.5" pipe there, and, for some odd reason, someone decided to convert it to 1.25" right off the sink drainpipe (and with glued PVC to boot). This makes for some frustrating work, especially, if that drain ever gets clogged (good luck getting into that P-trap). I would make the same cut Michael Karas made on the pipe coming out of the ...


2

The usual fix for this would be to extend the part of the pipe from the wall at the back of the cabinet out the amount needed to match up for the new sink drain location. In some instances there is a larger diameter pipe in the wall that the rear piece slides into and is secured with a compression washer and a clamp nut. The horizontal slide joint makes it ...


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