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6

They have always been known as escutcheons. That's as far as I know. If it was for a door knob it could also be called a rose or rosette


3

I'm coming in a little late to help the OP, but wanted to add some clarification in case anyone else runs into this situation. I used the procedure outlined below dozens of times when I was a repair plumber in the 80's. The trap arm going to the wall is 1 1/2" OD tubular drawn brass (usually chrome plated). It's going into a cast iron "sanitary tee&...


1

Epilogue: I ended up replacing a one foot section of the drain pipe below the T with a clear piece of PVC pipe. I drilled a hole in the PVC pipe and covered it with a sliding rubber coupling. I can now run a snake up the drain pipe to the T area without removing the drain pipe. I also tried a water jet, but it was difficult to maneuver. I also periodically ...


1

As I recall, it's called a tub shoe or drain assembly. I also believe plumber's putty is no longer recommended for this type of application. A new drain assembly kit should come with everything you need. Just read the box's instructions before leaving the hardware store, or the sales associate should be able to tell you everything you need.


1

As mentioned in the comments you first need to make sure that you have the proper washers assembled correctly on the tailpiece coming out of the disposal. Then, remove the P trap and attach the white drain pipe in the picture to the tailpiece first before attaching the P trap. This will take any potential lateral pressure off the joint that's leaking giving ...


1

Put a notch in the back of your drawer. If you do it carefully with a hole saw or jigsaw it'll just clear the pipe and not look terrible. I like to make the notch and then run a router with a roundover bit around it. The only other option is to raise the drain inlet in the wall.


1

Flexible drain lines are VERY prone to "double-trapping" themselves and failing to work. I don't know from a code POV but I'd guess not, and I know from experience that "draining things with hoses" can be fraught with peril - yes, I note that you said carefully supported. In most cases by using slightly oversized holes and exploiting the ...


1

If the union on the trap can be loosened so the sink end of the trap can be swung on an arc, then you could cut out a piece in the horizontal section and reconnect with a rubber connector which would allow axial rotation and would allow some in and out repositioning to properly line up all the parts for a leak free drain. If the union on the trap is cemented ...


1

Why do you need a coupler? I would undo the u bend outlet, shorten and re tighten.


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