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7

This is a tough one. There is no easy way to remedy your problem. The best way would be to remove and replace the tiles properly. If in fact the tiles are real marble, you can grind them to create the proper angle and slowly refinish the surface by stepping down grits and finally getting to a wet polish grit of 2400. That is actually impracticable for a DIY ...


3

There's no way we can say. The doubled joists may be sufficiently stout to carry the cross-beam. Or they may not. It's a question for an on-site engineer. Strategically there are no concerns, and there's nothing "hack" about it. It's no different than a break in the joists at any other beam. Almost every home in the U.S. has such a scenario. By the way, ...


3

If the cracked bricks are loose (as in when you wiggle them they move) they should be removed and new brick installed (or clean the old ones of mortar). If the cracked bricks are sound and secure the gaps should be filled ,as you noted, to keep water from further damaging the sill. There are many colors of concrete-type caulking, so if desired the gaps ...


3

Since you have isolated it to one particular sill maybe you should simply replace it again. In five months that sill may have gotten wet and activated some fungus that has been latent in the wood. I think replacement is the best piece of mind as well because if you just try to cover up the smell you will always be wary of that fact and be stressed by it.


3

I'm assuming none of these are structural shear walls since shot pins are inappropriate for such use. There is some arbitrary lateral load that interior partitions are supposed to resist, it's only 5 or 10 psf from memory, I can't find the reference at the moment. I'm not sure what the shot pins are rated for either. So without any more specific data, I ...


3

google "trim interior window" = video: http://www.thisoldhouse.com/toh/video/0,,20046338,00.html steps: http://www.thisoldhouse.com/toh/how-to/intro/0,,218130,00.html Assuming you have already: 1) insulated in the rough opening with low-expansion spray foam 2) sheetrocked to the rough opening


3

I'd say shirlock's answer is really the proper way to handle it. If you're looking for a quick fix, perhaps a rubber threshhold seal could be applied with silicon caulk. The key would be to find one that looks not-ugly, which may be the bigger challenge.


2

The anchor bolts need to go well into the block, preferably at least 8" in. You should place the anchor bolts in the head joints of the 4" solid run. No need to drill holes in the solid block. Worst case cut the solid block where you need to and set the bolt in the joint created in cut block. They should coincide in a hollow place in the rows of block below ...


2

The short answer is maybe, it really depends on what it was affixed with and how thick the granite piece is. The key to removing it (or anything) without breaking it will be to have multiple pry points simultaneously, or use a piece of wood (2x4) so that you are prying against the wood which can then spread the strain you are putting on the granite piece. ...


2

To answer the way the issue should be fixed is to replace the window. That way the rotted framing can be repaired too without the window in the way or have any fear of having the window drop from trying to undermine the old framing or, if the framing is still intact, if offers access to inspect it properly. I can see though, it will be quite costly to do. ...


2

Drill a hole, or a recess, into the bottom plate of the prefab wall, so the bolts holding the sill plate to the concrete just slide right in/through. Or, drill a similar recess into the sill plate, recess the nut into the sill plate (probably with a washer to spread the load over the thinner wood), and grind/cut the bolt off level with the top of the plate....


2

If you caulked it and there's still a leak, you didn't caulk the whole gap. Air isn't going to come through silicone caulk. For such a small gap, expanding foam is overkill and may do more harm than good if it expands too much and widens the gap, which could cause the window to start sticking. Another possibility is that there are additional gaps and holes ...


2

If the product your talking about is GreatStuff (which it sounds like it is), you'll want to use the window and door variety instead. The gap and crack formula expands too much, whereas the window and door stuff doesn't expand as much.


2

Looks like the mason centered the bolts where they expected the framed wall to sit on the foundation wall. They don't often spend a lot of time pondering what the carpenters will do, so this is very common. Short of an F3 or better tornado, it's not likely to ever be an issue.


2

Use a hammer drill with a 5/32" masonry drill bit to install 3/16" Tapcon phillips concrete anchors that are 1-3/4" long. The phillips head should countersink itself flush as you drive it into the furring strip. You may need to use a countersink drill bit before driving the Tapcon to help it sit flush depending on the hardness of the furring strip.


2

I guess the Water was previously redirected by the AC which was your sill. Therefore I would install a sill to redirect the water away from the house.


2

Yes. Your plans meet code for fire protection. The low voltage wires you mention do not require placement within conduit (but I think it's a very good idea for future use/change). Both the IRC and UBC requires one to "seal gaps around ducts, wires, and pipes at floor and ceiling level penetrations [between floors]." 602.8 "06 IRC"; 708.2.1 "97 UBC". The ...


1

It's called a threshold and 36" is a standard size but many places might carry a larger size that has to be cut to fit due to door framing. Your best bet would be to remove it and take it with you to a home store and get a close match, they can vary a small bit in style but the height needs to be the same as it will fit up against your door. I have always ...


1

It's recommended (and possibly required by building code) to add a sill seal below your sill plate. These are usually inexpensive rolls of foam, and serve to protect the sill plate from rot. The sill plate also needs to be properly anchored to the foundation, generally every 4ft is required. As far as a second sill plate, this isn't required.


1

That's probably just several layers of paint or paint plus a specialty undercoating for trim. Chip it off, ensure there's no mold, remove any rot using a wood chisel, patch with a good quality wood filler, sand to 100grit or better, seal with a good primer/sealer, and repaint. If you find mold it's probably easier to just replace the sill, bleach and most ...


1

Not sure if this is "correct", but one solution would be to lay one course of block underneath the sill plate. This would keep the plate plenty high above the concrete. You would probably still want to slightly taper the outer edge of the slab away from the building, to avoid water sitting there and seeping in through the block.


1

Air sealing involves sealing around conduit, not the conduit itself. No, there's no apparent fire barrier concern here.


1

There are many PVC trim and moulding options out there that would be perfect for this. PVC is now engineered to look like wood or stone, but it is non-porous so it will never warp due to moisture. Google "PVC trim" or "PVC moulding" to shop for some near you.


1

if this is an anodized aluminum sill (thats what it looks like), try using brake fluid. it will destroy just about any paint bond out there. just wipe up afterwards and degrease with a good quality degreaser. be wary though, if its anything else other that anodized aluminum (or an other uncoated metal), the brake fluid will destroy the coating (even ...


1

If your window still works in the wintertime, it will tell me that the window has not settled to hard on the brick sill at least not like the trim has. All you would need then is to caulk the cracks so water does not get in there. If the window does not act properly, I would suggest having the brick sill removed and lowered 1/4" so there is room for ...


1

You need to set up a temporary wall under the ends of the ceiling joists of the garage, bearing onto the floor of the garage. Since the section needed is so short, you will only need 5 or 6 2X4s or 2X6s to hold the ceiling and lift the wall for the short time while you replace the bottom plate. If you need 10 ft studs to hold everything up, cut 2 of them in ...


1

you more than likely have mold or some sort of fungus growing in the sill wood. outside of the risks from some species of mold (some can be quite deadly), and the potential for structural issues from rotten wood (walls falling down, etc), the first step is to kill the mold. just spray straight bleach over the whole area. wear a respirator rated for VOC's. ...


1

better than metal flashing and its excellent ability to repel water/moisture is self-sticking rubberized flashing. Although 15 pound roof felt also is acceptable. Either product should be lapped over by the (if any) house wrap and fastened with minimal nails ,etc. I'm not sure about the problem you have in regards to re-installing the clapboards? Won't they ...


1

There should be no gap. Looks like shoddy construction. See figure 16 from this page for proper alignment: Also I have never seen a "band" or "rim" joist that are configured in the fashion described by your image. It can't be good that half of the wall is resting out in space. You could rip a board to fit the gap so that the weight of the wall is ...


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