New answers tagged

0

I would fasten sheet metal angle (or Z-mold) flashing to the bottom of the furring strips before the siding goes on. The horizontal flange depth would be the 1-3/4" or 2-1/4" So that it's tight to the wooden sill or concrete foundation at the back, depending on height. Like so (elevation view): | | | | | | | <|------|-- furring ...


0

An L or Z-shaped metal flashing is often used to bring water from behind a cladding out to the front of the wall (for example, when the upper part of a wall is clad with stucco/siding/etc and the lower part is clad with brick/stone/other masonry). Metal also makes a nice barrier against things that chew, burrow, and otherwise damage structures. You could ...


1

If the height of the door to the bottom of the siding is any clue as to how high the floor slab is above the outside concrete, The siding could have been kept above the concrete perhaps 1" and still would cover the floor slab for weathering. This will be an over-simplification, but to fix it, I would carefully cut the siding 4 1/2" above the ...


1

Your problem: lack of wiggle room With around the corner off-limits due to the garage door, the space to the right of the existing panel being problematic due to what appears to be a telecom service drop that's sort of in the way in addition to having little to no room for any flashing or such that's called for by the new installation, and the 3'-from the ...


1

I agree with other answers regarding using tin-snips to cut the metal. You will, of course, end up with a sharp metal edge all the way round which should be buried under trim at the opening (as shown in your picture of a properly finished door). You will need to get creative with door casing molding of some sort if you intend to use the existing door jambs ...


1

I'd go with offset aviation snips to cut the sheet metal either start where sheets overlap or drill a half-inch pilot hole 4" from the edge and spiral out from that. Sheet metal has sharp edges wear work gloves. A sabre saw would also work but may scratch the surface finish. sawing sheet metal is VERY NOISY. An angle grinder will make an even worse ...


0

Both the answers from @DaveM and @FreeMan were helpful for pointing in the direction of doing something to cut the nails that went through the cant strip and shingle. That was the overall approach that I settled on. I ended up using a small keyhole saw that was on hand, but I think any of the tools mentioned might have been able to do the trick. One other ...


1

I suggest cutting the mount profile through the siding. this is how I start out and seal around the bracket. In some cases I use a square Hardwood piece to mount to that is thicker than the vinyl / aluminum siding. Squares are easier to cut and seal. Using hardwood creates a better base than soft wood and as it is usually larger than the holder process ...


1

I would recommend what you suggest about puling the siding piece, I have done that with great success, filling behind vinyl siding for deck ledger install. In your case, I would use plywood that is the right thickness, that fill the backside of the siding. Since the dutch lap will require the strips to be narrow, using plywood will keep the backing intact, ...


2

Marking the edges of the siding and use a circular saw with a high tooth count carbide blade. I have cut hundreds of feet of metal both ferrous and aluminum with a circular saw. The hard part here will be extending your openings and making wider looking walls but it can be done. Best to pull all the trim so you have the max opening and make 1 cut, put new ...


0

The reason you don’t see T1-11 scabbed in is because you have to use Z flange to keep moisture out. Z flange is a metal flange that mounts behind comes out and goes over the lower sheet in a z shape. This prevents water from getting in it will seal but is obvious.


Top 50 recent answers are included