Hot answers tagged

32

This is a result of building as efficiently (cheaply) as possible, and there is almost no need for room valves. First, efficiency: Valves are more expensive than pipe. Extra valves means more labor cost. If the valves are to be centrally located, then more pipe is required because each "zone" will have to be home-run instead of branching off a shared pipe. ...


23

The Viega Manabloc is an example of a system in which a central valve manifold uses a dedicated tube for every fixture in the house, as alluded in the comment from BillDOe. In some US homes it's not a difficult retrofit to split the house into at least two zones. Typically the water service enters an unfinished "utility closet" space where the water heater ...


18

Yes, that looks like your main shutoff valve. It's normally the first valve on your water supply from where it enters your house, and typically before the water meter. In my house there is another valve on the other side of the meter that makes it possible to swap out the meter without draining the house. The copper wire is part of our house's grounding....


14

It would be difficult to install area shutoffs in most residences, since they need to be accessible to be useful. The best case scenario is an access panel in the floor or wall, the worst case is outside the room in an adjoining room or closet. Even more damning is the fact that they would, by definition, be in non-standard locations. I pity the poor ...


11

Everybody wants to save money Builders and utility companies are not in the business of wasting money, which means the main line will be as straight and as short as possible. This is a big help to you, since it will narrow your search. Walk out to the curb shut off, and look back at your house. Try to determine the straightest, shortest path between the ...


7

Have you tried gently tightening the gland nut? It's the hex cap under the handle and squeezes some sort of packing against the valve stem. Tighten only in 1/16 turn increments and only if it moves with minimal force. If it acts in any way like it's tight, somebody else may have already compressed the packing to its maximum and no further seal is possible. ...


7

No, that's not a valve. It looks like a drain, as might be useful if the fitting had been installed in a fire sprinkler or steam line, or functionally just an odd-ball tee fitting.


5

This is almost certainly from using a "modified square wave" - MSW - inverter rather than a "true sine wave inverter" - the power conversion circuits in AC LED fixtures expect a sine wave input, and the way they behave when fed MSW input is upsetting your inverter. One possible solution, short of "buy a new inverter" (a rather expensive proposition, ...


4

I have found on old valves the valve stem separates from the gate. they close fine but then it feels like it is opening but is broke. You will probably need to turn the water to the house off , bleed the pressure off and remove the valve and install a new one.


4

Turning the water off and on and getting the air bubbles back out of the pipes often loosens up "crud" in the pipes. Some of that crud may be stuck in the sealing part of the valve. Try opening it all the way and running for a while, perhaps removing the aerator first. You might get lucky and have it work free of the valve mechanism. In many cases the "...


4

There are - just not usually in houses Commercial, industrial and multi-residential buildings almost always have isolation valves for floor or unit take-offs and for each "group" of fixtures. What constitutes a "group" depends on the layout of the building. Basically its a design balancing act between the how large an area has to be shut down for repairs or ...


4

In France it's commonplace. Not only having small shut-off valves for hot and cold, but also to toilet, washer, dishwasher shower and water heater feeds. There's also manifolds near the rising main and off electric boilers, which isolate each separate feed. Possibly over the top, and meaning more potential leaks, but nevertheless useful on occasions. It'...


4

Yes. Shut off the water off at the street before you try to fix it. Elsewise you will get a big flood. Then put in a ball valve. Ball valves work faster than gate valves, which can come in handy in an emergency. Ball valves last a long time and work even if they are unused for long periods of time.


4

Yes, all the water will drain from the second floor. It will take awhile because the faucet you're opening probably has an aerator on it which restrict flow and you only have gravity as a flow force. When working on a one story house the pipes, for the most part, are all horizontal so gravity isn't a factor. You can speed up the draining on two story ...


4

Here is the correct answer to the question as it is written. The copper ring is a ferrule, which is part of a compression fitting. You absolutely need the copper Ferrule for a watertight connection, and plumbers tape is not necessary when this type of connection is installed properly. If you do not know what a copper Farrule is and what a compression ...


4

Yes, unless the saddle valve is corroded. Then it won't turn off completely and afterwards possibly won't open back up. If it's really corroded you might not even be able to turn it at all.


4

Probably a broken wire or bad connection in the box behind the outlet where you plugged in. I recommend getting an electrician to look at it RIGHT NOW. You could cause a fire in the wall and burn your house down.


3

Yes, we typically are recommending 1/4 turn ball valves for valves that are not used very often. This would include sink stops, laundry stop, and main shut off. However each of those requires a unique solution to replace them per circumstance. The hose bibs we would not recommend a 1/4 turn ball valve as ball valves are not designed to be used often and ...


3

Your problem is very common with old multi=turn valves. The packings in the valve have probably dried out and split or shrunk a bit. Have you tried turning the valve open and closed a few times? If the packings are shot, you will see the leak change a bit in both open and closed positions. You can try tightening the nut around the on/off shaft just a bit. ...


3

It is most likely related to the inverter that you are using. Some inverters are sensitive to the kind of load that you put on them, and LED bulbs could easily present that kind of load. The inverter might be better behaved if you give it a better load - like a nice 50 watt incandescent light - along with the LEDs, though that obviously runs your batteries ...


3

The item on the left is the steam trap and can not be regulated or shut off. stay away from this item. The shut-off valve is the item with the screw on the top. Turn the nut ccw (counter clockwise), just slightly about a 1/4 turn, then put a wrench on the stem above the nut, I would use a 6" or 8" pipe wrench or vise grips, and try to turn cw (clockwise) ...


3

Yes it is your main shut off valve. I'm assuming this is in a basement, from the looks. You're good on that. The best experiment to prove this out is to turn the handle clockwise until it stops. This usually takes about 10 turns. The wire attached is a grounding conductor which more than likely goes inside your breaker box .


3

You can replace the handle but you've probably have to take it off a new valve that you'd buy. No reason to do that though, just wire brush the valve and throw a little rust remover on it. That's the main shutoff and there could have been a leak above it ,maybe on another faucet, that just ran down the pipe before or after the insulation was added. So clean ...


3

It is not uncommon for the stop-valves at the wall to fail (in various ways). The 1/4 turn valves generally seem to last longer than the traditional style valves, but they fail too. Your only option now is to turn off the water at an upstream valve and replace the stop valve. Your home should have a main shut-off, or you may have to go out to where the water ...


3

If you do not have a shutoff below the dirt level or at the house you can pack dry ice around a short section of pipe and that will freeze the water and make a plug . I have done this with galvanized and copper never tried plastic . Only an inch or 2 being frozen will plug the pipe and not break it. I have had to do this when I had to replace the main ...


3

Using the graphite rope isn't as easy as you would think. First off, you need the right size rope that fits in tight with one wrap. You don't use a continuous piece. You cut a piece equal to the circumference and push the rope in and butt joint the ends. Then do it again with another piece of rope and rotate it so the ends don't even up with the previous ...


2

That looks like a 1/2" copper pipe with the valve soldered on. Definitely check it with a magnet before trying to wrench it off. If it is copper and you are not handy with soldering, you could replace it fairly easily using a valve with a compression fitting inlet: You will have to carefully cut the pipe behind the existing valve, and use steel wool and/...


2

In general, there's no problem using the main valve. However, if the sink valves are stuck, you might find that the main is also in poor repair. If the main is old and rarely used, you might find that's it's stuck or will become stuck once closed. If the main valve is a gate/globe valve, and it looks old and cruddy. You might want to consider replacing ...


2

That's most likely a copper pipe covered in solder. You can try scraping the solder off to see if you get down to some copper to verify. A copper pipe cutter is cheap and easy to use: Get this onto the pipe a close to the valve as you can, tighten the screw until it's snug, and spin it around the pipe making sure to keep spinning on the same location (you'...


2

Yes, putting the gas service shut-off in the laundry room would be fine (though they are typically found behind the appliance). Remember, this is a service disconnect valve (for maintenance or replacement of the appliance) not an emergency disconnect valve (in the event of a gas leak). The "emergency disconnect valve" is at the meter since the first rule ...


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