5

It’s called “self sealing” shingles (or lack thereof). Shingles are made to self seal to each other by having the sun heat them up (including the asphalt strip on the underside) and the weight of the shingle will cause the asphalt to press into the lower shingle. When the shingle is hung at more than about 6:12 or in a cool environment, then the weight ...


4

Staples are far more prone to cause leaks than roofing nails. For a pro roofer with a coil nail gun, they save no time at all .vs. using nails. For a non-pro who can actually use a hammer, they save very little time .vs. nails. Likewise, in the normal process of construction, it's quite common to have some period of time where the underlayment is the only ...


4

I work for a metal roofing company, and this is a big area of concern for a lot of homeowners. Here's what I can say: based on experience and facts. 8-10 years ago, the fasteners on exposed metal roofing were terrible. They failed CONSISTENTLY. There were very few competing fastener companies and rubber washers cracked and leaked like crazy. And when your ...


4

It doesn't come fully attached. The black line at the bottom is an asphalt strip that is sticky when hot, the sun heats it and it sticks the pieces together. This is a bit of a special case because of where the shingle is located and thus the smaller size and odd shape and that is why the problem happened here. And at the bottom so water flow down the ...


2

Yes, there are several things required to make a “valley” installation waterproof. There are two ways to install valley shingles: 1) “open cut”, and 2) “closed cut”. Here’s an illustration of each: http://esgreenville.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/timberlineinstallation.pdf You have the “closed cut” system.


2

That is not unusual if you live in an area where the wind /rain are blowing at an angle to the home. Even with no real wind it can happen and a photo would be helpful. It may be a slight difference in the stagger of the shingles or possibly the overhang has a slight sway or droop there we usually leave a bit of an overhang on the sides and I probably would ...


2

Yes. Short of actual leaks (which are better avoided by replacing before you notice them) aging in asphalt shingles (if you don't know when they were installed) is assessed by observing loss of the mineral covering and any signs of cracks developing, or loss of bond allowing the tabs to "flap" in the wind. If you do know when it was installed, and it was ...


1

My answer would be no you cannot. It may depend on your location, maybe not, but a metal roof will allow condensation to form on the underside and that will allow other things to grow like mildew, from the existing growth you have, or keep the other alive too. You will need to clear the old roofing material and lay a condensation barrier down to keep the ...


1

Yes, to a degree. Older shingles have lost much of their resilience and coating and what's left can often break easier or get knocked off easier. New shingles can be damaged by hail but older ones are much more vulnerable. You also don't know exactly what type of hail fell on your roof vs. one just down the street. Hail can vary a lot in a very short ...


1

You should be able to make a claim if its several pieces sounds like the lamination never did its job to stick to the other part of the shingle. Could be due to the way it was made from the company its worth the shot to make the claim.


1

Its delaminating like you said! The shingle is made of two mats that are adhered together giving the shingle its dimension! This is a manufacturer defect and more commonly happens on steep or mansord roofs! You can try and make a claim with the manufacturer if you know what kind of shingles you have! Best thing is get a couple tubes of roof cement and put a ...


1

It appears the layer of shingle material adhered at the factory is coming apart. Use roofing tar or even roof caulking which is also an adhesive. Watch out for this continuing to happen as it may require replacement under the manufacturers warranty.


1

It was probably installed in cold weather. Being in a valley it most likely sperated when the installer pushed it in to valley. When was roof installed


1

Probably. I wouldn't do that. Modern fiberglass shingles are fairly thin compared to the organic (paper) mat ones of the old days, and you will likely see the bulges after a few hot days. The manufacturer probably only recommends using cap staples under the assumption that it will sit exposed for some period of time and needs to hold up to the wind. It's ...


1

Wind / slight pitch variation at that portion of the roof maybe... You can add a "rain diverter:. Basically, something to redirect the water towards the gutter at the edge of the roof. You can lift the shingles a bit and slide a L shaped piece there for example, say 2" x 2". You may not even have to attach it. I've even seen home owners use a piece of ...


1

Is anything special needed to prevent water from getting underneath the overlap? Gravity... water doesn't flow up hill...


1

I think it depends on where you live. I live where we get a ton of rain and it blows sideways. When the metal roofing expands and contracts, it causes the head of the screw to move, thus the neoprene washer moves. It often gets “tweaked” from the movement causing one side of the washer to curl up. This allows wind blown rain to penetrate the roofing system....


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