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17

Replace it now. Like TODAY. That's BAD. With that kind of bad shingle wear, your shingles are likely to create ice dams which will cause water to back up and leak through the roof, causing interior damage, compounding the cost. In the summer, the roof won't hold the water because it can't freeze, so the curls will only grab a very little water before it ...


11

I wouldn't worry too much about it. The plywood is not typically supporting a load of more than the paper and asphalt shingles that were placed, even more so if you have a considerable pitch on your roof to where it would be difficult or impossible for a person to walk on. It basically serves so that you have something to nail the shingles down securely. ...


10

"Shingles torn" "Nails showing" You very probably have leaks you have not yet noticed. If you re-roof now, you might not rot out the roof deck and need to replace it as well. If you wait until you have leaks you notice, you may find that you're rotted out the roof deck and be looking at a far larger bill. However - don't hire ANY contractor that drives by, ...


10

As much as you probably don't want to hear this, I am quite sure you are stuck with the job as it is. The time to decide if the sheathing needed to be replaced or over sheathed was when the roof was stripped clean. My first observation is that you said you had 3/8" plywood. 3/8" would be the absolute minimum size, 1/2" or 5/8" T&G would have been ...


10

The ceramic granules are the protective layer of the shingle. They're not merely aesthetic. They offer UV, impact, and corrosion protection, and the shingle is vulnerable when they're removed. The roof probably will not leak now, or in a few weeks, or a few months, but eventually the shingles will deteriorate badly enough that water gets through above the ...


8

It's good that the roof is not leaking (you didn't mention that) but improper installation will create leaks in the future. So, verifying a few key items and then officially notifying your builder (by certified, return receipt mail) of incorrect installation will protect your rights. I'd check the following: Number of nails in each shingle: Each roofing ...


7

That's not too sloppy. Under that shingle should be the vent, tar paper, and perhaps the top of the next layer of shingles. Since this is right next to your ridge, there won't be much water coming down the roof to this joint, so the risk of any leak around the vent is very small.


7

During the high season (when you'll need it urgently) it's harder to find and schedule a roofer to come out. Insurance won't cover all your losses : if it covers any losses. Much damage can be hidden from view. When it's not an emergency you can get competitive bids and get a good price for a roof that will last until you die and then some. You don't ...


6

Yes, it works - although most recommendations I've seen prefer zinc to copper (both more effective and cheaper). In fact, you see it all the time on older roofs underneath galvanized roof fixtures. For example, my neighbor's house: Basically, each rain washes metalic zinc down the roof and basically prevents any growth and lasts for decades. Copper does ...


5

Either shingling a wall or a roof, there is no magic formula, just practice and experience. I will give you a couple of hints. (trade secrets so don't say I told you!) Since you are working on a roof, this can be a little tricky but doable. First, separate your shingles into piles by size. You can usually make 4 or 5 different piles. Open 3 or more bundles ...


5

What BMitch said, but I would like to see them trimmed back from the vent some. They should not be flush, let alone so tight that they can be propped up like the one in your last pic. Making physical contact w/ the holes in the vent allows an opportunity for water to divert from the shingle into the vent. Cut that back a quarter inch or so, to prevent ...


4

That's what I've done in similar situations. Cut off the top half of the shingle (using the piece without the glue line) and 2-4 nails right through your last shingle. Cover the nails with a drop of roof cement.


4

Less chance of cracking Standard shingles are a bit thinner than ridge cap shingles, and can crack or tear when folded over the ridge. Ridge cap shingles are thicker and come pre-bent, so there is less chance of cracking. Better adhesion Most ridge cap shingles have an extra dollop of adhesive near the end of the shingle, to help hold it to the shingle ...


4

It is possible that your ice & water shield will peel up cleanly depending on age, climate, current temperature, sun exposure, etc. Try that first, otherwise... Installing drip edge under the two layers of shingle that should be present will take care of 99% of the water flow. The small amount that may come down during ice dam conditions may run under ...


3

Because the rot from leakage will damage the sheeting and anything else it gets to. When the roof comes off, the foolishness is exposed. Insurance does not cover neglect. Our neighbors tried this little ploy and nearly had the house condemned. One wall rotted out, cripple wall nearly ready to collapse. Maintenance is cheap, repair is expensive, crippling ...


3

Nail down, through the tar strip the dark grey shingle in your image. Cut a new piece in half, throwing out the half with the tar strip. Glue down the cut shingle with roofing cement. Remember to cover the nail heads from the last step. I believe you can buy roofing cement in a caulking tube if you don't happen to have any left over.


3

Yes it will leak. There's tar paper or tyvek or something under the shingles that will help provide a temporary defence against leaks, but you need to repair or replace those shingles. This is more of an opinion, but that's a lot of little dings to repair... and if you don't get them all, it could be for nothing (leaks can cause a lot more damage). So, ...


3

Yes this looks correct. You're right about cutting away too much shingle, but it looks like you fixed it with sealant.


3

Yes. You would want to protect the shingles if there is to be a lot of foot traffic on the roof. A good way to provide that protection is to get a couple sheets of 1/2" plywood which you lay over the shingles. You can also cut the plywood to size in the case that whole sheets do not cover the work area. The plywood does need to be secured in place so that it ...


3

Not from what I've seen. From the dozen of so slate roofs I've seen and had, they were all applied directly to flat tight seamed planking. Typically, only wood or other types of roofing that aren't waterproof and need to dry-out have a furring-strip or stepped off underlayment. You'll just want to replace any rotted areas with new planking (best) or ...


2

I own a roofing company and have used both products. Our go to shingle is the GAF timberline, but from time to time we will upgrade someone to the OC duration. One of the benefits we found with the OC is the nylon nailing strip. We don't have any nails blowing through and if we need to rip on up, most times the nails come with it. So as far as what the ...


2

If the two halves of the shed are built to be structurally sound while separate, then there is no reason that each roof can't be built slightly asymmetrically so that one overlaps a portion of the other to provide weatherproof protection, like this: Some tweaking of the interface would be needed to make it practical and convenient, but the basic idea would ...


2

I call them manufacture burn holes, I see them in most roofs even roofs only 1 year old, it is normally where there are either loose stone or poor seal of the stones on the shingle and with out the stones there is no protection and the sun will burn right thru the asphalt, it looks like your in this picture had some help with insects or yellow jackets, ...


2

Almost all sky lights on a roof are mounted a 2x3 or 2x4 curbing that is nailed down to the roof sheathing. Flashing metal pieces are the bent up and nailed to the outside of the curbing and put down under each succeeding tier of shingles. The skylight generally us sized to fit on the top of the curbing and has a flange that comes down along the side of the ...


2

Get the curling ones fixed. As you're getting quotes for that, ask for a quote for an entire re-roof and decide for yourself. (If it was me and I had the money, I'd re-roof entirely to save the bother of having segments out-of-sync, but I understand the way new home ownership goes.)


2

It depends on the quality of installation, but on average exposed fastener metal roofs (which do, indeed, use EDPM washers if not of very low quality and life-expectancy) are a 15-25 year roof, while a quality standing seam job is a 50 year roof. The EDPM washer is not a band-aid - it's a part of this roofing system design (and most of the fasteners are ...


2

You should claim it and have it fixed professionally. This type of damage could result in leaks, you should have them replaced, and don't try to jerry-rig a fix yourself. Depending on your insurance company your rates should NOT go up for making a claim for this type of damage. Well, not your rates specifically as a result of your claim; everyone's rates ...


2

If there's a solar equipment distributor near you, check with them. Products like this exist for this very purpose. Ironically, because you're just grounding the equipment, the conduit itself, if it's metal, can serve as the grounding conductor (so it'd be empty conduit). Look for "conduit roof flashing."


2

Exposed nails not only look bad but the heads will deteriorate faster being exposed. On the occasion I have a shiner I will cover it with a small amount of roof patch. I use an asphalt based patch and collect some of the sand from a bundle then it is hard to see even if you know it's there.


2

I believe with a properly adjusted gun better results or at least more consistent results are possible. I always carry a hammer to set nails that hit a knot but I don't think it is cheaping out. In 20 years watch him starting to have have to wear a band on his elbow and possibly surgery from swinging a hammer. Full head nails available today are the same ...


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