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I used these extensively in my kitchen remodel. Wood shims always seem to split on me. And, since I live in a humid area, wood shims disintegrate over time. Many of my original base cabinets have settled leaving a gap between the counter and the backsplash. This is how I assumed that they should be used. When hanging wall cabinets, you loosely tape them to ...


3

Assuming you're installing cabinetry along the entire wall, I'd do this: Find the point on the back wall that sticks out the most. Measure out one cabinet depth and mark a line over the entire length of the floor. (Use a grout line as a reference-- even if your tiles are off-square, these are the lines your eyes will pick up as square.) Install cabinets to ...


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I'd push the cab against the back wall and scribe a filler strip (somewhere between 1/2" and 1-1/2") on the right side. But realistically, if the counter edge on the left (beside the fridge) is perpendicular to the wall, nobody but you would ever notice.


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Your idea to use shims on the ends will work fine. No need to get too critical on how they are made. They can be 1/4" all the way through or they could be tapered. If I may make a suggestion, if you left the end that will be shimmed lay on the beam to be shimmed and set the other end with the joist hanger, and nail the center of the new joist, once it ...


2

I ran into this video: https://youtu.be/uGjY26i6xvU which shows a builder dropping a shim on a screw used to attach something to a wall. Alternatives here would be a solid shim (has to be placed on one side of the screw, making things uneven, or requires 2 shims) or a circle (harder to place correctly, doesn't give additional benefit). The horseshoe shape ...


2

Does the sheathing connect to the top plate securely? If not, because of the shims, you will need to run screws from below through the lower top plate. You could use long hurricane clips instead. Photo courtesy HD Supply I have seen long screws run through both plates from below, just like you have from the top, just run them in.


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It's now fixed! We ended up doing it mostly the same way as suggested in @isherwood's answer, but with some differences. The sistered joists were connected using staggered 12M coach bolts, toothed timber connectors, and strong wood glue. We used screws to temporarily hold the sisters in place to drill holes for the bolts, then unscrewed them to put in the ...


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I'll make some assumptions in an initial answer and revise if needed. Your joists are sagging due to the weight of the brick wall. Your flooring (subfloor and possible finish floor) are warped into a channel as well. You are not trying to save hardwood or other finished flooring. Here's what I'd do, in general terms: First, decide what material you'll use ...


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Given that a "standard wood shim" is a wood shingle that's too narrow to be a shingle - buy a pack of wooden shingles. If you want more (with the grain the other way) buy a clapboard or two. Or simply use a bunch of normal shims next to each other.


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This strikes me as an XY question. Why not just slap a 6-foot scrap of lumber on the side of the joist, tight against the floor? No whittling necessary.


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Larger shims I usually just cut to fit from plywood. The layers in the plywood allow you to change the depth pretty easy by chiseling and just lifting the layer up until you want it to end.


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I like to have 1/8" to 1/2" gap all round. if you run out of gap you do not need to pack it, you can even plane the back of the jamb to make it fit.


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Bypass nails/obstacles Material wise they will be more efficient with more support area per unit of material. It is easier to hit and direct a horseshoe with a hammer than a circle - more directional control when placing into tight opening. Under a window where the window may allow water to leak on the rough opening sill if you install the open end on the ...


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This is the solution I went with, one of two suggest by the inspector: The double top plate acts as a diaphragm to distribute load, so it needs to be solid. I used strips of plywood of increasing thickness to shim up and fill the gap. As Jack suggested, I also screwed up into the trusses from the bottom, and used hurricane ties on the truss I couldn't get ...


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If you put the cabinet tight to the right wall and then install the fridge next to it the cabinet will look out of square as it will be 90 degrees from the right wall. A gap will form between the right cabinet and the fridge or the fridge will be skewed. So as the cabinets run looking at your picture from right wall to left the gap in the back would have ...


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I ended up stacking two shims and inserting them from the accessible side. the secret is to guess the right thickness that the side that is not accessible to you can take. After that you remove the two shims, you trim them and you put them back


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