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Instead of just using a plank, have you thought of making the shelf more like a floating shelf instead? If you do that, you could mount the shelf directly to your studs and provide significant support in a hidden manner. 


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Use Unistrut, such as A1001A or P6001A. Flat surface up. Several rows of it. Tie them together somehow - either tackweld them or tie them with rigid steel straps on the bottom which bolt into the Unistrut to hold it parallel and surfaced. Have 3 of these at the 1/4, middle and 3/4 of the span. They could be pretty conformal, say 3/16" thick if you use ...


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If there's no support in the wall (seems dubious that 2 meters of wall would have no studs...?), the best option by far is to just put uprights on the ends (and for that long, probably also the middle) of the shelves and make a self-supporting "bookcase" or freestanding shelf that can be stood against the wall, holding itself up from the floor, rather than ...


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I love those ez anchors they can support a fair load. At 77” long and only 7” deep I would consider L brackets that require 2 screws each this would provide ~100 lbs of support at each bracket l bracket is similar to your angle but one side is 3” the other is 1” or 1/2 my local big box store has this type of angle or bracket. The issue here is the front ...


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I wouldn't rely on those anchors for a shelf. They just don't spread the load over enough of the plasterboard. Expanding anchors spread the load more, but a shelf could end up full of books or a child could try to climb it. Personally, if I can't find a stud, I'd create something to transmit the load to the floor. Either a plank on each side, or individual ...


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If a steel flat is secured to the back edge rather than the front it'll hide better. If the flat bar must be taller than the thickness of the shelf it could be concealed by installing a thin false back sized to fit neatly between adjacent shelves. There's probably little benefit in choosing an angle rather than a flat bar. The vertical section is what gives ...


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I recommend trying out the Sagulator. It suggests that a 66" run in 1" Beech should have an acceptable sag. If you try to reduce the thickness to ½", it will be very saggy. An edging strip will have to be quite deep to strengthen the shelf. Those calculations assume the back edge is unsupported. If you support the back edge, and add brackets, things ...


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A good way to add stiffness to a book shelf is to add an edge wise board along the underside edge of the shelf. If you are able to support the long shelf in one or two places along its length at the rear of the shelf then you can get by just adding the stiffener along under the front edge of the shelf. Appearance can be improved by setting the stiffener back ...


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You can put a 1/2"-thick wooden board over the metal piece to camouflage it. And if the shelf is really that long, you'll need something strong for the metal piece. A structural engineer could probably tell you the minimum dimensions, but I would guess a 1.5" angle, or square tube, would do it. And that means you're limiting access to the shelf below that. ...


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Assuming your shelf won't come apart under the weight of itself and books, you have several options. 1) Your shelf looks wider than standard 24" distance between studs, so you can mark location of the studs behind your shelf at the height where an UPPER horizontal shelf part crosses the stud. Do this near to the left end of the leftmost horizontal & the ...


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If the shelves truly are unfinished, it will be fine to prime and then paint them. However, it is not common to have shelving with no surface protection at all (like varnish or veneer). Put a few small drops of water on a back corner in an inconspicuous spot. If the water soaks right in, you are good to prime and paint. If the water beads up and sits there ...


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