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55

It was installed incorrectly. It appears what you have in the picture is a knotting anchor. Near the tip of the plastic sleeve is a threaded section. Properly installed, tightening the screw should pull the far end of the sleeve up against the wall, making a thick "knot" that prevents the anchor from pulling through the wall. Since your failed anchor looks ...


22

TL;DR If you mount the shelf supports directly to studs, do that. Just make sure to use long screws - at least 1" into the studs. There are two typical ways to attach a shelf (or heavy mirror or whatever) to a wall with screws: Anchors Anchors are the "plastic things". They come in various sizes/strengths - 30 lb. rating is typical. The way you normally ...


10

The general term for a hinge that allows something to move but keep the same orientation is a "pantograph hinge". The general term for that type of bed would be a "Murphy bed". The pantograph mechanism takes many forms, but the trick it uses is to have parallel connecting rods that pivot together so that the door or shelf that it is connected to can swing ...


6

Manassehkatz's answer provides good information. However looking at your photo, it appears you have some type of plastic expansion anchor of some sort. Because it's now out of the wall, I expect that you did not screw it down hard enough. That type of anchor should be tightened down so the anchor components are compressed outwards behind the wallboard ...


5

The mechanism - GRAVITY What keeps it stable - High quality materials and balanced weighting in the design. What is it? It is a high quality metal shelf with an extended arm on each side of the back. Why does it look cool? Because the arm rotation is solid yet flowing and they hid the joint inside of the side of the bed. If it stuck out it would ...


5

They're called "custom-made brackets, specifically for this product". Otherwise known as "bespoke". You should be able to buy one of these from the company, dismantle it, and send a specimen to a metal fabrication shop, who will make as many as you please for you. Of course, by doing so you'd be violating their patents or design rights. If you can find a ...


4

I don't think I saw this point mentioned above - but if you did in fact drill a large, anchor sized hole into the stud, then there is one more way you could recover the hole and use it with wood screws - back fill it. Purchase a small wooden dowel of approximately the same size as the hole, use wood glue to securely attach it, and when the glue dries, ...


4

Decide which wall studs (the vertical 2x4s) will support the shelf Remove the brackets from the shelf Attach the brackets to the selected studs Place the shelf on top of the brackets Fasten the shelf to the brackets


4

I paid someone else to build this basic shelf for me because i'm no carpenter, Unfortunately, I am afraid the person that built this isn't either. There is a major weak point - the screws into the end grain of the cross pieces could just tear out of the wood. The gaps are not really the problem. There are a lot of stronger options for the joint but ...


3

I would use 3/16 Tapcon screws. (Use 5/32 masonry bit.) The Tapcon screws are thread hardened specifically for use in masonry materials. The hardened thread will hold up better than a wood or machine screw. A lighter (smaller diameter) screw will likely suffice, but in my experience sometimes heavier weights get placed on shelves. To level the shelves, I ...


2

The most important factor is the unsupported length of your shelf. This represents a beam of length L supported at both ends (A,B) with a force applied in the middle (F): The lowercase "f" represents how much your shelf will bend, ie, how ugly it'll look once books are placed on it. With uniform load (fixed amount of weight per unit of shelf length), f ...


2

Almost any good quality 5mm (#12) screw in a set of four will carry 10kg (~22 lbs.) without issue, assuming that you're in solid anchoring. Plastic plugs of the correct size should do well, or wood if you're precise. I would actually consider using stainless steel machine-thread screws with hex heads. They'll look nicer and allow you to rotate the head to ...


1

You can not remove this shelf without damage In fact, the shelf itself would need to be destroyed to not damaged the supporting edge pieces. Even then, there will be a 'scar' where the shelf was attached. To remove it, I suggest cutting a section out of the middle of the shelf about 1 to 2 inches wide to split the shelf into two pieces to create room to ...


1

Hard to tell how it's attached without taking it apart. It can't be just glue, so there must be something else. Could be dowels. Could be screws (in which case, the heads might be visible on the other side of the upright, where the piano book is sitting) That shelf is a permanent part of the house, it wasn't built to be removable. It's going to be really ...


1

The flathead of the screw needs to fit into the keyhole bracket on the shelf and we can't tell whether it would fit or not without the measurements of the bracket. Even if you could drill the holes in the grout lines, you would probably nick or crack a tile. I would mount that shelf in the kitchen and get a bathroom shelf constructed of a PVC material and ...


1

Acrylic is not very resistant to bending. It is about 20 times weaker than tempered glass. 0.75 acrylic would be marginal. It would have enough bow to be visible to a sharp eye. And it scratches easily, as Ecnerwal mentioned. I would recommend 3/8" tempered glass. Definitely tempered, much stronger and safer than plain glass. And be aware that you cannot ...


1

It should also be noted that for the unit to support any significant weight the 2x4 should be not be flat, they should be turned 90 degrees so they are vertical like floor joists. I would also ad plywood decking to ad strength and make a solid shelf surface. I found a web site that has a plan for some shelves. https://dadand.com/diy-2x4-shelving/ Since ...


1

For how the shelf attaches to the uprights there should be a backup to the screws such that the self will rest on something even if the screws were to break. The simplest solution is to glue and screw a board just under where the shelf attaches. That will give greater surface area to the fastening than a few screws into endgrain. I can barely see some that ...


1

You can use 1/2" sanded plywood for the shelves, then trim the edges with a suitable looking 1x2 to look nice and add strength. This should work up to about 3ft wide. If you want to be even more sure it holds, shorten your distance between supports to 18-24". As an example, here's a pic of a 36"x12" kitchen cabinet with a 1/4" thick shelf filled with 50+ ...


1

it is somewhat difficult to answer because I cannot tell what is easy for you. It depends a lot of what kind of tools you have. One way I can think of requiring basic tools would be to cut 3 pieces of 2x4 to fit between the legs and attach them to the leg with screws. They are horizontally placed about 12” below your table top. Then cut the shelf and ...


1

Any 3/4" solid board (or 3/4" plywood) will work, as long as it's supported properly. I can't tell you what the cheapest wood is, because that varies by location (where I live, that would be knotty pine). Plywood is usually cheaper than solid boards, but it's a little more work. It comes in large sheets, so the first thing you have to do is cut it into ...


1

Here is a tutorial using a router-cut "Side Cleat Groove" and matching wall bracket. https://www.canadianwoodworking.com/plans-projects/levitating-shelf Side Cleat Groove – After the shelf is dry, a few passes on the router table will leave you with a groove to accept the side bracket. Next, cut the stopped groove in the same divider using a 1" ...


1

Edit: I didn't read the requirement that it be supported on the ends. The easiest way to support it from the ends would be with z-clips But they are 2 1/8 wide which is likely too wide. Tiberhan clips appear to be smaller. You may be able to recess it into the end of the board to reduce the gap between it and the wall. https://www.amazon.com/Bracket-...


1

While I have not disassembled this particular unit, I have found that Ikea dowels will pull out of one board when you pull apart (by hand) the boards they are joining. I usually leave them in the board they decide to stay in. When you pull the shelves away from the vertical divider, just be sure not to tilt them up or down as you pull away. If you want to ...


1

Disassembly should be done in reverse order. Do note though that IKEA furniture doesn't usually like being disassembled and reassembled. (I've had mixed success in the past.) I'd advise the following steps: Using permanent marker in the back to mark out where every part was, different colours vertically and numbered horizontally. Remove the thicker top and ...


1

Bookshelves are not designed to be trolleys! They will tear themselves apart if casters are put on the corners. I would have a 1" plywood deck to be a "chassis" that carries the dynamic forces between the casters. Fasten the casters to the plywood deck, then fasten the deck to the bookshelf. Normal wood bookshelves are not meant to roll around, and do ...


1

Jade Steffen offered one solution (back-filling the stud) to rehanging, but I don't see much here to answer that part of your question. If there are indeed wooden studs behind the holes, those holes are now far too big for any screw you can use with that shelf hanger. Luckily, E-Z Ancor makes a stud-compatible anchor called the "Stud Solver" that should be ...


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