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Gravel doesn't hold water so if the old asphalt drained okay I wouldn't anticipate any problem. Bit puzzled why the shed can't sit on the old asphalt and the gravel run around it to hide any asphalt still seen?


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To add to crip659's answer, three braces are enough. The red lines show where you should place 1x4 braces on the side walls, and the green line shows one on the back wall. The braces should preferrably be nailed to the inside of the framing rather than to the sheathing. Your roof is practically incompressible; if you keep its back two corners stiff you will ...


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I suspect the back is more secure-feeling than the front. You might try adding some small support braces in the corners to limit racking. They should be as large as convenient while not getting in your way and being at risk of a head strike. Look in the upper right corner at "knee brace". Basically push on it to see what's moving, and then break ...


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The sheathing that this wood shed has should be more than enough to act as cross bracing in order to prevent racking if the sheathing is installed properly. If the sheathing is installed with a single screw or nail, that attachment point simply becomes a point around which everything pivots as lateral forces are applied to the walls. Proper installation ...


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Cross braces at a 45 degree angle will strengthen the building. Two on the back and one at each side. Can use 1x4s or whatever. A couple of braces in the front from roof to front of the sides will also help. Can also use the centre post to add a couple more. About three feet down and three feet from side or centre post. As building is now, there is not ...


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I'm using an excerpt of the picture to answer the question. I was able to see it despite others saying it was members only. For a shed resting on deck blocks like this, the joists will rest on the shoulders of the blocks. Both B and both E boards will be supported on their ends by the deck blocks. The designers appear to have used bolts on the front to ...


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Assuming your Plywood is Grade 1 (Birch/Pine), at 19/32 you can run the joists at 20in perpendicular (floor) or 24in parallel (roof) for 50psf, so at 16 o.c. you're well within both limits. I am mixing roof and floor rating, but comparing at 50psf total, since there is no floor rating for parallel installations. This matters for how the load is distributed ...


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