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Are the posts on some sort of concrete foundation? If the posts are just sitting on dirt then they will eventually rot and I'd be worried about how much weight they can support. This is particularly an issue given the slope. Even if you don't want to go to the hassle of a foundation it might be worth sitting the posts on concrete pavers or blocks. The other ...


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Yes they should have been. You might be OK if you put a moisture barrier under them and give them a few coatings of a waterproofing sealer. Since they are not in contact with the ground, you should be OK for a while.


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As pointed out by the others, I think it is wise to provide vapor barrier and insulation for your region's concern. THe supplier shall have recommended the method of installation, concerning gap between boards, and naling vs screwing. The recommendation below is directly copied from the linked article FYI use, https://www.workshopcompanion.com/KnowHow/Design/...


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I would believe the builders over some guy any day. Will a taller block and gravel make a difference? Sure it will but if you have good drainage it really won’t matter. I have seen folks dig out earth and put rock down for the same reason “a guy said to” worst choice for them there soil was a high clay content so the rock pit filled and held water (yes it ...


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Regardless the wood rot question I would apply a layer of rocks with landscaping fabric underneath to make it unattractive for rodents and bugs. To keep the moles & rats out I use a bed of large-potato sized rocks. Keeping the weeds out with the fabric also helps with managing the moisture & bugs.


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Yes, you do need a disconnect at the building. It does not need to be outside. You can only have one electrical circuit to an outbuilding, so plan accordingly. I.E. you can't just trench a second cable if you need more power.


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To me that's a no-brainer, for several reasons. It's much better protected in the wall, and it's not in the way of shelving, cabinets, wall surfacing, etc. The NEC requires that all cabling be out of harm's way. Most interpretations prohibit surface-mounting of wiring for that reason. I prefer to run cables through the rafters (over the wall), and then ...


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Your roof edge may have different details, but the concept is the same - drip edge is required to prevent water damages. Drip edges are metal sheets, usually shaped like an “L,” installed at the edge of the roof. Also called drip edge flashing or D-metal, they serve a vital function by directing water away from the fascia and into the gutter. Without a drip ...


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You are correct that you are only allowed 1 circuit to an outbuilding. However, there are some exceptions. One of those exceptions is for different (e.g. specialty) uses. A perfect example here would be allowing you to switch the lights on/off from the house. As in "whoops, left the lights on in the shed, I don't feel like going to get my galoshes, ...


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Can you abandon the old wire in place? Sure. Well, technically I think I recall reading something in NEC about removing permanently-abandoned wiring where feasible -- let's just say it's infeasible to remove that direct-bury cable and move on. Yes, if you up-size to a 20 A breaker you'll have to replace the 14 gauge wiring in the shed with 12 gauge. So far ...


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I've built several sheds for myself without rafter or collar ties. They're both 10' wide and rock solid on the roof. I used 1/2" OSB gussets fastened with construction glue and 1½" screws: The fact that you have a steeply pitched roof isn't a concern. Actually, it reduces stress on the gussets. I would build your gussets about 12-16" high. ...


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First I have a barn that is very very similar - basically exactly the same, but I just enclosed the overhang section. So I would suggest something similar to the picture below - you can google "roof truss plate". (obviously not a perfect example as that top center hole is not needed... this is not a great example, just the shape of the plates I ...


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