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7

Michael Karas is correct in that a half-height block foundation wall is common, but that doesn't really address your concern about water intrusion. His suggestion to seal the block does, and that wouldn't require the blocks in the first place. I would build your walls with bottom plates of treated lumber one nominal size wider than the walls themselves, ...


5

+1 option #4, plastic standoffs. "Any thoughts on the most robust way to anchor the posts?" You said you are renting and can not anchor. Take some five gallon buckets and mix up some cement, fill the buckets with the cement and put an eye bolt in so it stick out of the top. Put a nut and washer on the threaded part of the eye bolt that will be in the ...


4

It is fairly common on a flat slab to create a curbing using stubby height concrete blocks. These blocks are typically about 4 to 5 inches in height. When used on a garage (for example) it is typical to place the curbing adjacent to the edge of the slab/foundation. In your case you where you want to inset from the edge of the slab you could choose to apply ...


4

As with any structure you need to define the loads on it (wind, snow, furniture, people etc) and from there define the structure or framing capable of supporting those loads. There may well be local codes or regulations that need to be respected as well. Since this does look like a neat design, why not check out a local structural engineer or architect to ...


4

Virtually none. It isn't just about the strength, but the stiffness. It'll flop around like a fresh fish. Take it from someone who has done something similar with 3/4" PVC conduit and found even that lacking when a foot of snow landed on it.


4

Absolutely doable, though it may take a while. If your goal is to end up with wood that is usable for another project, then hammer and crowbar are the right tools. If your goal is simply to remove the shed and toss everything in a Dumpster, then a cutting tool such as a Sawzall: will make the project much easier. If you plan to reuse the wood, then ...


3

After further contemplation I suspect that we're discussing siding, not sheathing. The latter is installed over framing and under siding. Siding is probably plywood or pressed fiber hardboard. Most sheds (and indeed most homes) in my region are built using 7/16" (about 11mm) oriented strand board (OSB) wall sheathing underneath some sort of siding. This is ...


2

There is no problem with running the feeder from the garage's subpanel to the shed. The only thing you have to watch out for is the remaining capacity of the garage's panel. The heaviest load in the shed is going to be climate control if you choose to install one. All the rest you'd need for remote work can be powered of a single 15A circuit.


2

So, from the comments, I assume you mean "slot shelving" to be shelf standards like this: If this is what you mean, then you should be able to use them, and are quite handy for adjusting the spacing. Biggest issue here is getting the proper ones for the weight of the shelves. More standards (the upright slotted bar) you have will allow for better weight ...


2

How deep do you want to trench? You'll need 24" of cover for buried cable, or 18" for common/cheap conduit. You can use exotic conduit called Rigid or IMC, which only requires 6" of cover but is more expensive. Use 1-1/4" or larger conduit. That will future-proof you to 100A+. In the meantime, the large size will make pulling much more DIYable. ...


2

For your new shed I would have built 2x6 stud walls @ 16''oc and the same for the roof joists. In Ontario, you will need 6'' walls to get a minimum of insulation. You can always fur out to get more depth for insulation if you have already built the walls but that won't change the strength of your walls. I'm not sure what the snow and wind loads are in your ...


2

Probably not. My flat has a balcony with a couple of wooden cupboards built in to one side. Wasps have built a nest in one of those (despite there not being much of a gap). Obviously, if you can make the shed air-tight, that will stop them, but otherwise - not so much. To deal with wasps: Firstly: can you live with them? They are an important predator ...


2

Agree that you don't need an engineer. From a code perspective, this is just a tiny house. An archi/draftsman would be totally capable. Only caveat I'd point to is that something that looks suspiciously like a tiny house on the back of your property might be considered to be an "accessory dwelling unit" (ADU) by your AHJ, and so might be driven by zoning ...


2

I recently build a 8x14 shed using 2x8 pressure treated joists and there was no bounce. It felt solid with a 3/4" PT plywood floor. Your design is larger, so I agree with the 2x10 that you spec'ed. I don't think you'll have an issue it all. I was originally going to try and save some money so I mocked up a few combinations of 16" oc and 24" oc with 3/4" ...


2

Yes , pier blocks are great for sheds make sure you have enough for your project. I usually dig down 1/2-2/3 the height of the pier block to get below the topsoil this reduces the amount of settling and any issues with frost heave in the winter, luckily our winters are not as cold as the Midwest and back east. So frost heave is not much of a problem with the ...


2

See pages 24 and 33 of the instruction manual. The ridge was installed first, and the roof panels slid in place. You'd need to do the opposite to take them out.


2

You are correct to worry that the sistered joists connection to the post is weak. What's supporting that corner is the shear strength of the 4 framing nails above the post, the friction of the 2x4s being compressed by the bolts, and the levered shear strength of the bolts. You could improve it by: put a bolt through the 2x4s above the beam. add 2x4 blocking ...


2

It rather depends on your shed construction, but can't you just have the wall overhang the beam by 2" (or even 3")? That way the overhang will cover the error up completely.


1

Strong winds or heavy snow will destroy that structure as you currently have it planned (if it would even be able to support it's own roof). Imagine that this structure is not a structure, but a stool - if you sit on a stool where the legs are not tied together somewhere other than the top, the legs of the stool will want to push outward at the bottom, and ...


1

A follow-up, in case anyone visits this later and is curious about the answer. Since posting, I have gone ahead and build the floor. The span was a little under 12' (about 11' 6.5"), and I used 2x10 joists with joist hangers. I used 23/32 plywood for the subfloor, and used liquid nails plus 2" deck screws to attach the plywood to the joists. It is solid ...


1

Yeah, it sounds like you're going to want to basically remove and re-install. The good news is that gutter is actually somewhat flexible, so you'll probably be able to make the adjustments without fully removing all the pieces. Cleaning the debris from the gutters is definitely a good idea, but it'll accumulate again. If you can get enough slope in the ...


1

What's the purpose of the two blocks in the center? Unless they're support a beam, they only effectively support the individual joists they're under. I would't use them. Worst case scenario they cause bulges in your floor. The metal angles are also unnecessary. The fasteners you use to connect the joists (galvanized 20d nails or 3" coated screws), along ...


1

An alternative to the answer given by jack is to cut away and replace the wood that is rotten and apply a weatherproof paint. This is only suitable though, if the shed has a slightly raised concrete base. The soil to the left will definitely need to be dug away and removed so the soil level is below the bottom of the shed.if the neighbouring ground is ...


1

You want to fix this, it will only get worse. You only have to replace the wood that's rotten but make sure you get it all. Cut out the rotten wood and square off the remaining strips. Frame some concrete backer board, wonder board, where the rotten wood was. Finish off the job with some stucco over the backer board and texture it similar to the wood grain. ...


1

If the objective is to remove the skylight for disposal and not re-use, consider to use a reciprocating saw or similar keyhole saw to cut away around the tabs. Heating not the tabs but the skylight under the tabs may permit you to distort them sufficiently, but it's also destructive.


1

I have seen houses constructed next to a building by the erection of fully constructed and painted walls from the inside of the house slab inches away from another wall. I did wonder how repainting would be done. You could have the slab trimmed with a concrete saw before framing. This would not be advisable if the edges of the slab are thickened.


1

Very easily. You need to run a three wire cable from the light fixture to the location of the switch/outlet. Disconnect the hot lead to the fixture and connect it to the black wire in the new cable. Connect the red wire in the new cable to the hot terminal or wire on the fixture. Connect the neutral (white) wires in the fixture box. Connect the ground wires. ...


1

I would consider beefing up the beams a little and going to just four posts. Using table 14-40 in this document: http://www.southernpine.com/app/uploads/SS_13-14L.pdf you can use doubled No. 1 2x10's for a 10' beam supporting 10' long floor joists. Depending what's available where you shop, if it's easier to get No. 2 grade, you might want to bump ...


1

You can set up the shed as a subpanel of the garage subpanel, supplying it from a 2-pole breaker in the garage. Alternately, if the sizes make sense, you can avoid using 2 breaker spaces and simply continue the garage feeder onto the shed with the same size wire. You would either double-lug the garage main breaker, or use a wire nut or 3-lug terminal ...


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