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4

The NEC only allows a single feeder to a building (NEC 225.30). If you want seven 20A circuits you would need to run a single set of 4 larger wires to an electrical panel, drive a ground rod (or rods depending on local interpretation) and break out your circuits from there. A good plan would be 3/#6 + 1/#8 ground being fed by a 60A breaker in 3/4" PVC. If ...


3

Your "3 hots + 3 neutrals terminating in 1 subpanel" is paralleling. You can't do that, NEC 366.20, unless a bunch of things are true, starting with The wires must be 1/0 or greater (so 125A per parallel) The supply end of the cable must be special equipment rated by the manufacturer specifically for paralleling. Typically this special equipment will ...


1

You can't parallel wires, or run a bunch of circuits between two buildings It's illegal to parallel wires skinnier than 1/0 (NEC 310.10(H)), and also illegal to run more than one of the same kind of circuit (same voltage, similar/same usage) to an outbuilding as that violates NEC 225.30. So, both your original plans are of no use; practically speaking, ...


1

I would definitely recommend gravel for the primary reason that it will drain moisture away from the shed more quickly than concrete. As far as the plastic grid+gravel method, I don't really have firsthand experience with that style of foundation; I'm more familiar with installing a treated wood perimeter filled with compacted gravel to place the shed on. ...


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