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Yes , pier blocks are great for sheds make sure you have enough for your project. I usually dig down 1/2-2/3 the height of the pier block to get below the topsoil this reduces the amount of settling and any issues with frost heave in the winter, luckily our winters are not as cold as the Midwest and back east. So frost heave is not much of a problem with the ...


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See pages 24 and 33 of the instruction manual. The ridge was installed first, and the roof panels slid in place. You'd need to do the opposite to take them out.


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A follow-up, in case anyone visits this later and is curious about the answer. Since posting, I have gone ahead and build the floor. The span was a little under 12' (about 11' 6.5"), and I used 2x10 joists with joist hangers. I used 23/32 plywood for the subfloor, and used liquid nails plus 2" deck screws to attach the plywood to the joists. It is solid ...


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Yeah, it sounds like you're going to want to basically remove and re-install. The good news is that gutter is actually somewhat flexible, so you'll probably be able to make the adjustments without fully removing all the pieces. Cleaning the debris from the gutters is definitely a good idea, but it'll accumulate again. If you can get enough slope in the ...


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What's the purpose of the two blocks in the center? Unless they're support a beam, they only effectively support the individual joists they're under. I would't use them. Worst case scenario they cause bulges in your floor. The metal angles are also unnecessary. The fasteners you use to connect the joists (galvanized 20d nails or 3" coated screws), along ...


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An alternative to the answer given by jack is to cut away and replace the wood that is rotten and apply a weatherproof paint. This is only suitable though, if the shed has a slightly raised concrete base. The soil to the left will definitely need to be dug away and removed so the soil level is below the bottom of the shed.if the neighbouring ground is ...


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You want to fix this, it will only get worse. You only have to replace the wood that's rotten but make sure you get it all. Cut out the rotten wood and square off the remaining strips. Frame some concrete backer board, wonder board, where the rotten wood was. Finish off the job with some stucco over the backer board and texture it similar to the wood grain. ...


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If the objective is to remove the skylight for disposal and not re-use, consider to use a reciprocating saw or similar keyhole saw to cut away around the tabs. Heating not the tabs but the skylight under the tabs may permit you to distort them sufficiently, but it's also destructive.


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