16

One way to raise the floor, and possibly the most reasonable cost wise, is to install what I would call sleeper joists sitting the top of the existing subfloor and than add new subfloor covering over those. These "sleeper joists" would be installed as 2xX material on edge. This could be 2x6 planks spaced 16" apart. It may be necessary to rip the 2x6 planks ...


7

A good ol' scrap block of two-by does nicely. Just set your laser 1-1/2" above your slab height and kick the block around as you work. This doesn't work for ceilings, of course, but hopefully you have fewer points to measure in that case. You'd have to use something with a suction cup or magnet otherwise.


7

That's actually the way one normally does such things, and has been since before there were lasers, other than one normally uses a rod rather than a tape for more consistent results. You establish a reference plane (Generally not going to any great lengths to try and get it super-close to the surface you are working), measure in a grid, and mark high spots ...


4

Faced with the same dilemma I went with French/trench drain in front of the garage. It fixed the water issue and really wasn’t hard to do with a diamond blade, skillsaw and pick. The sections of drain were $40 each and the blade was $15. It would have taken several bags of leveling/topping cement at $15 each plus renting a float and I don’t have the same ...


3

Spend $50 on a non contact moisture meter rated for concrete. Make sure your system is ok with whatever level you have spring/fall.. Floor grinding with a diamond cup grinder, followed by SLC (self leveling compound) for the low spots would minimize the SLC needed. Follow your vinyl flooring manufacturer for sealing/curing/dryness.


3

Acquire a rotatory impact hammer drill so that you can pocket rebar into the existing concrete. Buy 'high-strength' expensive concrete. If you called a truck for onsite mixing (an unnecessary expense), tell the driver, 7 bag mix. An alternative to rebar, for such a small patch, is to use long masonry screws, left standing proud to provide an anchor. E.g., ...


3

If I understand your question you are creating a raised floor section, 2 1/4 inches higher than the floor below it and you want to place you tub at this height. I think that you have some sort of frame in place into which you want to pour the LevelQuik, filling it up, so that it will cure into a level surface. I suggest against that. The maximum thickness ...


3

You can easily knock down any irregularity with an angle grinder and a masonry blade. It will generate a lot of dust, so you'll need some good eye protection and good mask. The answer to your question depends on how planar the surface is and what size of tile you are planning on using. Bigger tile requires a surface that is more planar, while smaller tile ...


3

The only drawback I can think of is that self-leveling products don't tend to feather themselves to a knife edge. They tend to leave an edge similar to what you'd see with a puddle of water on a glass table, with a bead of approximately 1/8 inch thick. So if your layer doesn't cover the entire floor you'll need to deal with that by tooling at partial cure, ...


3

I like it and it should get rid of that trip hazard door threshold. I'd stay away from the self-leveling anything and you don't want nor should now have level anyway. As you said, you just want to bring the dips up. Self-leveling concrete/cement would destroy the porch's pitch for water to run away from the house. You just want Flat, which is not the same ...


2

One solution is to cut subfloor on either side of the offending joist, plane the joist down, sister 2x6 nailers alongside the perimeter of the exposed opening. Then replace the subfloor with new 3/4 ply.


2

You could do either: level the floor or level the individual parts (shower enclosure, vanity, toilet) Which you choose will depend on the degree of out-of-level Self Leveler: self leveler does not need to stay intact after the backer board install. It can fracture and still completely support the backer board.. its got nowhere to go and it doesn't ...


2

The latex paint should not be more than 20%. So mix the latex and water at 2 to 10 and use it to mix 2 parts white cement and 5 parts fine sand. Adding ajax dish liquid (do not use dawn or ivory) to the mix alows and easier spread and a creamier texture like peanut butter.


2

Roughen all areas to be resurfaced, remove any loose or unstable material. Dry mix 5 parts fine sand to 1 part portland cement. Moisten entire area to be resurfaced. Add small amounts of water, a little bit at a time, and thoroughly mix until entire batch is damp. For initial dry-pack, proper mix should hold as a clump if you squeeze together in your hand, ...


2

Instead of temporary forms, make permanent ones. Cut a 2x4 in to a wedge shape, apply a thick bead of silicone down the middle of the underside, and screw them down with masonry screws. Once the silicone sets, fill your forms with cement. Now you have a nice level permanent pad for your machines.


2

One way to address this problem is to acquire a lower door threshold seal unit that slides onto the bottom of the door and is adjustable by sliding up and down to the threshold. They are then fixed into place using screws through the side flanges into the lower rail of the door. Here is a picture of what the product looks like. They are sized to the ...


2

You really should remove the stuff that was mixed overly wet - that tends to make cement products very weak. As a result, it should be easy to remove - might even come out with a stiff broom, if not, stiff wire brush might well do it. Check the labelling on your paint - in most cases you should wait at least 30 days before painting (or attempting to paint) ...


2

The problem that sometimes occur with basement concrete floors is if no vapor barrier is underneath than any ground moisture can permeate through the slab and into your living space. So if you happen to install a floor covering any moisture is going to get trapped underneath. This will cause any number of problems usually it will weaken the glue's bond ...


2

My family remodeled and has dealt with old and new layers of cement. I suggest the following plan based on our educated, though non-professional experience. Leveling Old Cement Floor Preperation If it is safe to rinse the floor, you should wash the floor with cement cleaner (an acid requiring a special brush). This is will remove the less sticky and more ...


2

ok guys, here's what I did. Of the highs and low spots, I found that there were a couple dips that were significant, by the door and by the stairs/bedroom. I filled both of these in with SLC (self level concrete) and the results were pretty good. Suggestions: follow the directions exactly, do not over water, it will be too runny.. I used 5.5L/bag and it ...


2

I am hearing that you have checked the regulations and want to push the boundaries and if you get caught be able to easily remove all your work. First and foremost you NEVER want a level ground in the out of doors. You have to know where every drop of water that lands on your property will travel to. I AM an expert with grading and drainage. I taught ...


2

If you are getting a 1/8" edge, you are mixing it too thick. It needs to look like it's mixed too thin, and spread it out. It will dry and you'll get the feather edge you want.


2

I just did my concrete floor for vinyl plank, and I would be concerned more for the flatness the the floor that it is within the tolerances needed. The bumps can be scraped off, at worst ground off. When I poured mine, I had high spots that needed ground down, quite the dusty job. The holes in the mix from the air bubbles will be of no concern, the flooring ...


2

How long do you plan to keep the house? I'd just get the tiles tested and remediated. How many square feet are you thinking about? Self level isn't cheap and if you want to make your basement usable at some time in the future you probably want to do something more through. I've fixed up a number of 1920 basements that had sump pits for ground water ...


2

Use a 2x2 of any suitable height. Pre-drill a hole in it (so it doesn't split), then screw in a lag screw about half its thread length. The lag screw goes down, to touch the surface being measured. Then mark a line on the 2x2 at the appropriate height so the laser hits it right on the mark. If you find your mark is not quite in the right place, turn the ...


2

Are there any devices or techniques to make this less painful? Yes. I have built myself one (it took me several attempts), but it depends on how your laser works. Mine is basically a cylinder (blue) with a rotating head on top (it can also be rotated 90° but I rarely need that), with three bubble levels on the sides and screws (green) to adjust it. I place ...


2

There is probably not a clear answer. If you want to be on the safe side cut off an inch or two (maybe more) of the drywall with the saw and use concrete expansion foam (comes in rolls) where the drywall was (glue it on). The kicker board will cover later everything.


2

I would be looking at getting some self leveling mortar/ concrete mix and at the very least, filling in those voids. Your sub floor needs to be securely fastened to the concrete floor which means it will "sink" in where the voids are and that will show when the new wood floor is installed. If you avoid fastening the sub floor into the voids hoping to just go ...


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