25

Almost all of the Home Depots that I do business with have short term rental trucks available right in their parking lots for very reasonable rates. Call in and reserve one for a particular time. Drive to the Home Depot in your car and park it in the lot. Go inside and checkout the truck. Then drive it up and load all of your materials and head home with it ...


21

You didn't mention how you're using the ratchet straps, but from your concern about slipping, I think it's possible that you could be using them to better advantage. So I apologize if this is what you're already planning to do, but just on the off chance it isn't... For the MDF, you want the straps going over the edge of the MDF and running straight down to ...


16

It's called a spanner slotted (or slotted spanner) head. Useful site here. Hard to find in the UK, why the owner used one I cannot imagine. Screwfix doesn't have them. This site may do, although it is international. You'll need to figure out the correct size before you order. Alternatively get a real cheap flat-head screwdriver the right width and file ...


15

I think that's a Spanner bit:


13

You could just chill out. Putting up bars or plastic on that door is truly ghetto. Doors like this are not inherently unsafe at all. Your door is appropriate for your neighborhood. Your door would be unsafe or inappropriate for a bad neighborhood or an apartment building. Having this glass probably does not effect your chances of burglary by ....


13

Yes, a switch that shuts off power to the garage door opener would make it unresponsive to commands from a remote (or anything else, such as a hardwired button). In some models, it may be possible to wire a separate switch to disable only the remote receiver while maintaining the functionality of wired buttons. You may also look into setting a new code for ...


12

What I have yet to find a solid answer on is what is typically run to the keypads. Do I run cat5/6, or use the same security wire (or both)? I recommend running 22/4 and cat5e from the security panel to the keypads. That provides lots of options. Once I run the wires to each window, where do I leave the wire? I recommend leaving a coil of wire in the ...


11

You could consider attaching a thick acrylic or other plastic panel that covers the interior of the glass and is firmly screwed to the door. The edges can then be covered with molding. Such plastics are shatter resistant. While they can be broken, they will not yield to the tools of most casual home intruders (unless they carry sledge hammers or blow ...


10

The common practice for future expansion is to install the box and put a blank cover on it. That eliminates the requirement of chopping into the drywall to find the wire. It also eliminates the need to create as-built documents and store them for future reference so you can find the wires later. My recommendation is to install device boxes with ENT (...


9

Note, I'm not anywhere near an alarm professional, however I have installed a couple systems before and have just recently been researching again as I prepare to move into a new house where I'd like to install an alarm. Keypads You'll want a keypad anywhere you normally enter/exit the house, such as by the garage door or back door. As @bib points out, you ...


9

If you don't use conduit outside, make sure you leave drip loops - where the wire runs down lower than the hole and is screwed in there, then back up to the hole. You should see this on cable tv and telephone cables as well. It prevents water from running along the surface of the cables right into the hole. Make sure you use outdoor rated cables. Make ...


8

IR motion sensors can be thought of as a low quality camera with only one color, IR. They are constantly comparing the IR levels across a grid to see when there is a quick change in IR levels. When you look at the housing of a sensor, you can see this grid, and unlike that of a digital camera with mega-pixels, these sensors only have a dozen or so ...


8

You may want to consider keyless entry systems. The cards can be programed to allow or deny access. Once a conventional key is issued it will work until the lock is changed. A keyless system can disable individual cards in the event of loss or theft. The initial cost may seem high but if you are rekeying locks and making 48 copies a couple times a year it ...


7

I like the buried chain idea. In fact, you don't even need to use cinder blocks. They make 'earth screws' which are large auger-looking thing that you literally screw into the earth. Typically used as playset tie-downs or party-tent tie downs. Alternatively, maybe attach a bar to one of the fence posts. I'm thinking one of the stainless hand-bars you'd ...


7

Presuming you're talking about passive infrared or PIR detectors, you do not want them pointing at your windows. They detect changes in the ambient temperature in the field of view, and pointing at windows causes them several problems: heating registers are often located under windows, so when your heating system turns on and off, the temperature will ...


7

I think you're overthinking this. I carry all kinds of lumber on my roof rack all the time. The 2x4s are no problem at all. Just strap them down tight, one at the front bar and one at the back bar. Sheets goods are harder. Your drawing is completely not to scale and I think you will be surprised how big 4x8 is when you get it up there. However as long as ...


7

Many camera's like this popular Lorex model: come with a small 2" surface mounting "Plate" that you can use if you don't have electrical box mounting. They also screw into a 1/2" weatherproof threaded knockout, so that they can be used with 4" weatherproof flood light accessory plates:


6

Most code states that all railing balusters must be spaced no more than 4" apart to prevent a child from inserting their head. So, that is one measurement you could use...if you don't want anyone's head to get through: 4". Of course, also make sure you can't get an arm through that could reach the window lock. Edit by OP: According to http://upload....


6

Trenches are hard/expensive. Conduit is inexpensive. Having dug the hard and/or expensive trench, investing a tiny bit into having conduit in the trench so you never have to dig that trench again is just sense. Direct burial is silly. It's especially silly the second time, when conduit the first time would mean no need to dig again. It's a short-term ...


6

The MDF might be a problem. When driving at any appreciable speed the sheet will catch air and try to sail up and away. This is compounded by the air that is pushed up and over your hood and windshield, right up into the MDF. I had two sheets of particle board that broke off where the straps were holding them down. It wasn't a clean break :) I would ...


6

It's called a "Thumb Turn Cover", "Door Latch Guard", or "Cylinder Guard" and installs under your thumb turn mount plate, so it should be a DIY job. It took me a very long time to pick out my security door for this reason, it's very hard to find one that blocks potential reach-around disarms for less than $600. The most secure ones I saw all ensured that ...


6

Power cord method Have an electrician install a power receptacle within cord's reach of the camera Route cord from camera to receptacke Plug cord into camera Plug power block into receptacle Extension power cord method Get a 12VDC extension cable with the right ends on it. Run the extension cable with the ethernet cable, follow rules for Class II low ...


6

It sounds like you are near salt water, probably get a lot of sun. This is a bad place to cut corners on outdoor rated, corrosion resistant materials. I doubt that those white wires are rated for outdoors / UV resistant. I am sure that those natural colored (not black) cable ties are not UV resistant. I couldn't rule out they just forgot or just didn't ...


5

Ok, too many questions, but i will hack at a couple points. On new construction, I would go with the recessed round contacts on the lower sash. completely hidden The thief that comes in a gutter repair truck probably has ladders. My general rule is all windows get sensors unless they are visible from road and require more that a 15' ladder, or hidden and ...


5

Is your switch lighted/illuminated (something like the picture)? When I put in CFL bulbs in sockets with lighted switches we got the same situation that you described. I believe the cause is the same as what @Steven already described. As for a solution, that might be a good topic for a new question. :)


5

Honestly, there is no right or wrong here. The preferred location is either the top of the door or on the side (either hinges-side or the opposite of). You will want to place the sensor so it is easier for you to wire it to the control panel. For example, if this is the basement door and the control panel is on the top floor; you may want to install the ...


5

Yes, locks can be picked, or bump keys can be used. There's no difference in using these tools to unlock vs re-lock a lock.


5

Passive infrared sensors (PIR), use Infrared (IR) light to detect motion. Unfortunately for you, infrared light does not travel through glass so well.


5

A locksmith can order (if necessary) and set up padlocks or locking hasps that respond to your house key, unless the house lock is using a particularly uncommon key blank. They may be a bit larger than the ones designed to be sold in bulk, and they will probably be a bit more expensive, but the price shouldn't be unreasonable.


5

As I understand there is an USB option on the camera. The easiest solution I can think of is connecting it on a raspberry pi which you can connect to you wireless network and retrieve the data daily. You can check out this totorial https://pimylifeup.com/raspberry-pi-webcam-server/ where they are doing the stuff you want to achieve.


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