5

Jack's answer is completely correct. I will simplify the answer with some easy advice. Use some acrylic painter's caulk in a caulking gun, never use a silicon based product in this situation. When you cut the tip, only cut off enough to leave about an 1/8 inch opening at the tip. You want to push out a very thin bead of caulk that can be "pushed" into the ...


4

The condition you outline is not uncommon. It usually results from humidity changes. Typically, the tolerances were a bit too tight when the house was built, not exactly squared or the door framing was not secured as tightly as it should have been. Here are a couple of things you can do now to mitigate the problems. Replace the center screw of each hinge ...


3

I am surprised this even happened at all. That is given 2 things have been met. The moisture content of the trim that you were using was low enough, 6-10%, and the wood used was a decent grade that did not contain "grain runoff". The way to minimize the gaps that occur is to use biscuits in the joints. The style of trim you chose, the traditional style ...


3

The general principle to use is that actual air leaks are a lot worse than just having poor insulation. Look around your doors, windows, plumbing, attic/basement/crawlspace access hatches, fireplace, and anywhere else where there's a hole in the wall. Anywhere you feel air movement is an issue. Anywhere you can see daylight (that's not glass) is an issue.


2

The boards shouldn't be attached to anything but themselves (glued & jointed together) & must literally float between the battens & rails. The battens, bottom & top rail should all be rabbeted to allow for full invisible movement of the boards, behind the battens & rails rabbets.


2

My answer is old school but it has worked for me many times. Get a roll of that semi clear plastic and tape a piece to the entire inside window frame, basically sealing it. Any air leaking will either bow or suck in the plastic. you can then work on fixing any leaks and will know when you've succeeded because the plastic will quit moving. here is a link to ...


1

One way is to heat the whole house so it is above the outside ambient temperature, say 24 degrees C, then use a thermal camera to take pictures of the outside walls and roof surfaces of the house. Those walls, windows etc that are loosing heat faster than other surfaces or parts of surfaces show up. If the camera is calibrated then it will provide a scale ...


1

Short answer: Put some splines in those corners! Based on the details of your situation, that is probably enough. Long answer: Wood movement can be a problem for frame miters because the boards will get wider and narrower with humidity changes. This means the 45 degree miters will try to stretch themselves to be slightly different angles. Here's what I would ...


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