Hot answers tagged

17

As suggested by @Ecnerwal, I wrote to Custom Building Products' customer support. Got a reply within 15 minutes: The isolated areas look to be a bit of sealer residue that might not have been wiped or rubbed dry with dry paper towels after each application within 3 minutes of each application? If so, this can be safely scrubbed off at any time, using a ...


16

Wait until it dries and use a razor blade to scrape it off.


8

Rub a little Tabasco™ sauce or other hot sauce of your choosing on the caulked joint. That will cure most critters of chewing on things they shouldn't. Granted, it's a bit odd that the cat chooses to gnaw on silicone caulk, but usually a good hot sauce will kill the desire to eat the object.


7

It is a very bad idea to caulk around the base of a toilet. It is an even worse idea to caulk around the base of a toilet with a known seal leak. Do not wait, pull the toilet up and replace the seal and make whatever necessary repairs as soon as possible. You don't know where that nasty waste water will end up if you seal it in.


7

Did you use all the grout at once? Some grouts aren't dry mixed well at at the factory. If you read the fine print it will say to mix the dry grout BEFORE adding water to. So if you do it in batches and didn't mix it, you'll get uneven results. When you wash it, it's just getting wet and hiding the problem.


6

In the bath tub the only joint needing caulk (commonly) is the wall/tub intersection. If your pet only is interested in pulling out caulking you might try repairing the joint with silicone, but than covering it with a plastic wall molding This is installed with an adhesive. While I wouldn't recommend using this exclusively to repel water it would protect ...


4

Wire mesh is a good idea in that it maintains the same level of ventilation offered by the current openings. Only you can decide of the ventilation is necessary or desired. I could see problems of blowing and drifting snow getting inside the shed in the winter time and if that is a problem then you may be up to eliminating the openings. If you do decide to ...


4

On the mirror specifically, you may be able to use acetone solvent, however this may harm the splashback. If you have extra you can test, but it will not harm glass My go-to solvent for cleaning ANYTHING off of glass is non-chlorinated automotive brake cleaner, which is usually a mix of acetone, methanol, toluene, heptane, and hexane. HOWEVER, this is quite ...


4

First off, and most important, get rid of all the sealant. You can carefully scrape it off with a razor blade or sand it off with some sand paper/emery paper. Make sure you have assembled the sealing washer correctly, with the small lip going into the hole of the cistern. I have always had to tighten the fill valves with a pair of Channellocs, same with PVC ...


3

Beading isn't a problem. If it was, a persistent rain would also be a problem. Chances are the oils on the surface will eventually be removed by weather and the beading will subside anyway.


3

It appears to me that since it is on the roof, subject to extremes, that the joint needs to withstand the expansion and contraction of the PVC pipe. That joint you are referring to is just that, it is a slip joint that allows the pipe to grow and shrink in length and presumably still not leak, since is a closed system, or supposed to be. There should be a ...


3

Isherwood's right & make sure you're actually getting the blowing air from the bath fan on the outside of the house. Also, after showers or baths get into the practice of letting the fan run for another 15 or 30-minutes. You just want to fill, actually fill, that crack below the tile is all. Squirt caulk INTO the gap & then force more caulk into the ...


3

I have used zinc make sure the strip extends beyond the shingles , we started using wide zinc strips at 2 levels after moving to Oregon and noticing no moss or fungus below the metal roof vents. I like black jack it is a good sealant and if putting a roof I accidentally have a shiner a dab of blackjack on top will seal that exposed nail head. Make sure to ...


3

If I understand correctly, you've sprayed expanding foam into the head of your blinds. It has now fully encased all the working mechanism of the blinds - the rods, gears, strings, etc. You could take the blinds down, remove as many external parts as you can, then with a series of small picks, knives, scoops, etc. dig at the foam for several hours, ...


3

Loctite's Power Grab is a very good alternative. It dries hard and has very good adhesion while also being available in white or clear. You may have to get their Ultimate version to be fully waterproof.


3

A leaky union is probably caused by one of the following: misalignment of the two parts -- not sufficiently close to a straight line debris between the mating surfaces (maybe there's solder here too..?) not enough compression squeezing the surfaces together damage to the mating surfaces of the two parts Examine the work carefully and figure out which of ...


2

You can set the toilet right on the subfloor with the wax ring if the flange is not so high it hits the bottom of the toilet when it is set in place. Set it just like it is on a finished floor. When I renovated my bath the last time, I set mine on the bare subfloor for the short time before the tile went down. In regards to the shower and mentioned in ...


2

Duct tape (very sticky, possible removal of more than just the tape) or Electrical tape (just sticky enough, easy removal) over open seams. Otherwise, just tape cheap plastic painting tarps from above the shower right down into the tub's walls, tight will keep blowing movement to a minimum. If it's a shower & not a tub you'll need tarps down to the drain ...


2

They're are insecticides that will keep these flying drill bits from nesting in your eaves. The ones I know of need to be applied by a pro but seem to be good for multiple years.


2

That looks like a good solution. There's no fire hazard there (if there were, you'd also be worried about the wood). You may have to switch to something thinner at the bottom there, and use additional pieces to fill in the joints between the blocks. Something I've used with good success are lengths of foam pipe insulation; it's cheap, and you can easily cut ...


2

Silicone will give you the squish and sealing you’re looking for, will hold up well with temperature changes, and can be cut and scraped away later if necessary. There are silicone sealants made for automotive applications that would probably be best here considering the wide temperature swing. Like this one, used between metal parts that are bolted ...


2

From your description, I'm visualizing that you want to attach a cover (metal to metal). If the parts mate well, superglue (cyanoacrylate) may do what you want. The original thin liquid type works best when the surfaces make good contact so that there is a very thin layer of adhesive between them. Such a joint will be close to airtight. It doesn't work ...


2

From the potability standpoint I think you will want to definitely plan to have high performance hand operated water filter unit available to filter any water you would try to drink from this tank. Check at a place like REI to find a filter like the type used by canoeists when they make trips on rivers and lakes and filter lake water for drinking. It seems ...


2

Yes it can be sprayed, and says so on the bucket. The spray tip orifice needs to be large though, because drylock is more like pudding. At least .025" which is bigger than the usual size used for latex paint.


2

Once concrete is fully cured, you're not going to damage it with paint or other sealer. On the first floor of a building chances are good that it is a solid concrete floor rather than a thin coat of something. As far as the "type of concrete", that shouldn't matter much when you choose a coating. What does matter is the prep work that you do. When you ...


2

Actually 100% silicone isn't a great caulk in my book. It's hard to get off later and typically isn't UV resistant. What you want is a solid outdoor oil-based (mineral spirit cleanup) caulk (sometimes called Window/Siding). I really like Quad, but anything made for outdoors will do (even some latex products). If I were you, I'd also replace the cover. It's ...


2

Outdoor receptacle boxes aren't intended to be sealed Yes, that's right: the standard outdoor/weatherproof electrical enclosures in use in the US are not intended to be sealed against water ingress. In fact, the NEC contains an explicit allowance (in 314.15) for drain holes in the bottom of boxes. Why is this? The goal of a a weatherproof (NEMA 3R or ...


2

Attempting to seal this from the inside probably won't work. If insects are getting through, there must be a gap in the exterior sheathing or framing. Closing off that one gap under the trim won't solve the problem as the insects will find another route, such as through the carpet. Find the opening on the outside and either repair the problem in the ...


2

Look into getting window well covers. They are purpose built for this type of situation.


2

I would shy away from caulk just because you might have to remove the ring/trim in the future and caulk would make that difficult. Have you thought about using some weather stripping? It comes in various thicknesses and colors and is self adhesiving. It's easy to use and less messy than caulk.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible